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Full text of "Antioch News 07/02/1993"

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VOL. 107-NO: 27 



ANTI0GH.JULY2, 1993 




Adopted 

Wadsworth Lions Club members clean up the stretch of belaney Rd. they 
adopted. Front, from left, IVIlke Mueller, Karl Heuer, and Frank Kaiser. The Lions 
were the first organization in Illinois to participate [n the Adopt A Highway 
program. Bob Neal, county board member, was Instrumental in pushing for the 
program.— Photo by Gene Gabry 

Parade kicks off Fourth 



by CLAUDU M. LENART 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Residents should plan to arrrivC early 
for the parade to hear voices of the Fourth 
of July Community Choir herald in 
weekend festivities at 9:45 a.m., 
Saturday. 

At 10 a:m., the parade steps off on 
Main StrceL The parade includes a pet 
parade, a bike decorating contest and a 
costume contest. 

"The parade is really shaping up nicely. 
We're expecting about 120 units," said 



Tom Kessel, publicity chairman for the 
Fourth of July Committee. 

Leading off the parade will be fire 
trucks from area fire departments and 
rescue squads. Also marching in the 
parade this year arc volunteers who helped 
Antioch win the Governor's Home Town 
Award for Centennial Park. 

At 11 a.m;, Saturday. Sl Ignasias 
Church will sponsor a food hoo\h. 

Also at 11 a.m., opening ceremonies 
feature flag raising and singing by the 
(Continued on page 10) 



Battle for senior complex 
continued until July 19 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Ldkeland Newspapers 

The first Ixittle for the zoning variance 
changes for tlie Antioch Country Inn 
property in Antioch Township has been 
continued until July 19 as only a few of 
the 12 experts for the petitioners were 
able to testify. 

Experts for Virginia Ross, the owner 
and designer of the proposed senior 
housing development on a 16.3 acre piece 
of land along Grass Lake Road, were 
expected to finish their testimony at the 



June 28 meeting' iii the Antioch 
Township Office. Since the petitioners ~ 
didn't get to finish their testimony and the 
opposition has yet to express their case to 
the Lake County Zoning Board .of 
Appeals, the decision to continue the 
meeting was passed by the board after a 
three-hour first session. 

Antioch Township Supervisor and 
Lake County Board member Jim Fields 
said he will await the decision of the 
zoning board before commenting publicly 
(Continued on page 9) 



ONE SECTION-64 PAGES 



500 PER COPY 



Teenage ^gangsters 

Area teenagers 
claim gang 
membership 

by MARY FOLEY 



f 



Lakeland Newspapers 

The signs are here. While there are no 
graffiti decorated walls, there have been 
several well-inked desks in Antioch 
Community High School depicting the 
"fork" of the Gangster Disciples. The 
question is iJien how well entrenched are 
youngsters in' the Antioch, Lake Villa, 
and Lindenhurst areas in gang 
membership. 
According to some local teenagers, who 



wish to remain anonymous, there are the 
beginnings of gang membership in the 
area; However, to dale it does not appear 
to be a pervasive problem. According to 
the youths', local membership, in the 
Gangster Disciples (CD's) seems to be 
very small. 

Antioch police seem to concur. "There 
are really no .organized gangs here," 
Sergeant Ron Roth explains. "V/e don't 
have a gang problem, just a few isolated 
incidents." Instead, Roth believes most 
of the problems stem from gangs very 
infrequently drifting into the area from 
Round Lake and Waukegan, 

"The incidents arc very isolated," said 
Rolh. "It has been documented that these 
(Continued on page 10) 



Kelly, Kaja 




The pageants are over and the queens 
have been crowned. Kaja Milovanovic, 
age 7 is the winner of the Littfe Miss 
Antioch contest Kelly Sullivan, age 17, 
is the winner of the Miss Antioch 
contest. 

Kelly Sullivan, an Antioch 
Community High School senior said, "I 
was so surprised to win, I am still 
shocked." Sullivan is a swim team 
member and loves sailing and skiing. 
She plans to attend college majoring in 
zoology. 



For the immediate future, Sullivan 
plans to try for the Lake County crown. 
"It was a lot of fun," Sullivan explained. 

First runner up is 16-year-old Jenny 
Kpcal. Erin McCallum was selected as 
second runner up and Miss Congeniality 
is Gina Hoerle. 

Little Miss Antioch, Milovanovic 
attends Grass Lake School and will be 
going into the second grade in the fall. 
She loves school, dancing, tumbling, 
bike riding, and swimming. But right 
(Continued on page 9) 




Miss 
Miss 



Antioch 1993 Kelly Sullivan is congratulated after winning the title. Little 
Antioch 1993 Kaja Milvanovlc takes her walk, —Photos by Mary Phillips 




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Lakeland Newspapers' COUNTY NEWS 




^^(^Morid^, July 5: Hol^^ 
; lines! will be j^ejffectH 



Flood cancels 
council meeting 

PARK CITY— The Park City City 
Council will have to reschedule its regular 
Thursday meeting. The community room 
was unavailable due to flooding. A deci- 
sion on when to have the meeting was 
expected Friday. 

Dissolution suit 
goes to state court 

NORTH CHICAGO- North 
Chicago's bid for dissolution will be heard 
at the Circuit Court level to determine 
whether or not the- move is 
unconstitutional. Charles Rose, an 
attorney for District 187, said, "The judge 
felt that the case should be in state court 
because he feels the case concerns issues 
that have more to do with the state 
constitution that with federal law." U.S. 
Judge George Marovic said in his ruling to 
"remand the case back to state court 
because issues of • a complex nature 
predominate over and federal claims." 
Marovic's ruling indicates that the 
constitutionality of a school's ability to 
dissolve has never been argued in an 
Illinois court. 

Developer donates fiinds 
for bullet resistant vests 

LAKE ZURICH— Lake Zurich 

trustees were pleasantly surprised when 
John A. Sfire, a local developer, offered to 
donate $2,160 to purchase six bullet 
resistant vests for the police department 
during a Monday committee meeting. 
Sfire made the offer from the Sfire 
Brothers Development Corporation for the 
"great job" the department has done. The 
trustees will vote on the committee 



recominendation to purchase 18 vests for 
$6,480 as part of the village's recent 
agreement with the department, and Sfure's 
donation, at their July 6 meeting. 

Insurance move 
saves Dist. 50 bucks 

GAGES LAKE— Woodland Dist. 50 
Board of Education members have 
approved entering the Niles West Co-op} 
saving $90,000. The current costs of 
health, dental and life insurance is 
$815,306.63 and the new plan will cost 
$721,474.93. 

Drama backers 
seek more funds 

GURNEE— All Dist. 56 salaries, for 
extra curriculum pay may be increasing, 
but the rate is not strong enough for 
backers of the Gumee district's drama 
program. Mark Jeep, president of the 
support group Studio 56, presented the 
board of education with a case for more 
funds for drama in the next district budget 
The^board will look into options. 

Explorer units get a 
taste of police work 

LINCOLNSHIRE — About 70 
young people competed in various events 
in the 2nd annual Northeastern Illinois 
Police Explorer competition June 24 and 
25 at Half pay School. Participants 
includes' Explorers and police officers 
from Antioch, Buffalo Grove, Fox Lake, 
Libcrtyville, Lincolnshire, Lindenhurst, 
North Chicago, and Vernon Hills. 

Beauty pageants held 
in Vernon Hills 

VERNON HILLS — Reigning 
monarchs have been selected to represent 
the Village of Vernon Hills for the 
coming year. Patty Gruber won the title 
of Miss Vernon Hills. Brianne Schenkcl 
was selected Junior Miss Vernon Hills. 
Stephanie Mustari was crowned by her 
sister Stacy, last year's Little Miss 
Vernon Hills. 

Woman in possession of 
700 grams of cocaine 

VERNON HILLS— Kathleen H. 
O'Callaghan, 35. of 1958 Camden, West 
Bend, Wis., was charged with two counts 
of unlawful possession of a controlled 
substance after police searched the vehicle 
which she was driving and discovered 
approximately 700 grams of apparently 
uncut cocaine was inside two gym bags. 
In addition, cutting materials, packing 
materials, and heat scalers were found. 
O'Callaghan had no idea of who owned 
the vehicle she was driving (she had met 
the owner at a party the night before and 
he had given it to her), and she wanted to 
return the car to him. Charges against 
O'Callaghan include unlawful possession 



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of a controlled substancerand unlawful 
possession of cannabis, which was 
discovered in her purse. She was 
remanded to the Lake County Jail and is 
being held on a $50,000 cash bond. 



Area youth to lend a 
hand at celebration 

MUPJDELEIN — Members of 
Police Explorer Unit 184 will be 
assisting the Mundelein Police 
Department at Mundelein Community 
Days. The post was brought back after 
several years' absence and currently has 
about 18 enthusiastic members who will 
be on hand at the Police Department 
booth and will be helping the officers 
during the parade. 

Lightning Strikes 
Woodland school 

GAGES LAKE— Violent storms 
which ripped through the area Saturday 
night claimed a school and a pole barn as 
its victims. Lighming struck at Woodland 
Elementary School multiple times. A 
bam on Hunt Club Road was also hit, ac- 
cording to Gurnee Fire Depl. Estimated 
repair costs are $15-520,000. 

Merchant offers sale 
due to the flooding 

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS— A 

Round Lake merchant is offering 
substantial reductions in her prices as a 
result. of the flooding in the Round Lake 
Area. Nancy Schtarbaumer of the Wonder 
Years used store on Rollins Rd. in Round 
Lake Heights, said residents can pick up 
items at a low price that might not be 
covered by their homeowners insurance. 
As an example someone can get a twin 
bed for under $20. 







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Chain to remain open 
for holiday weekend 

FOX LAKE— The Chain C Lakes . 
should be open to boaters this holiday 
weekend despite the heavy dose rain the 
area experienced this past week. Chain O' 
Lakes Waterway Agency Chairman Dr. 
William Dam said the waters on the 
Chain had dropped enough during the 
week, before the midweek storms, that the 
lakes could handle another inch or two 
rise before any closing would be 
announced. "We arc expecting a good 
weekend," said Dam. "There was been a 
good balance between rainfall and water 
levels dropping on the Chain. We don't 
anticipate any problems." 



I FREE "LIVING TRUST" SEMINAR 

Find Out How To 

Transfer Your Estate To Ypur Family 

Quiclcly Witliout Probate Fees 






ATTEND ONE OF THESE FREE SEMIMARS [■ 



GRAYSLAKE 

Thursday, July 15 

1 and 6 p.m. 

Free Lunch Or Dinner 

The Farm Bureau 



GURNEE 

Thursday, July 22 

1 and 6 p.m. 

Free Lunch Or Dinner 

■Hampton Inn 



GRAYSLAKE 

Thursday, July 29 

1 and 6 p.m. 

I'*ree Lunch Or Dinner 

Whitney Street 



Attend One Of These Free Lunch Or Dinner Seminars 
And You'll Receive a FREE. One Hour, Private 
Consultation To Discuss How A Living Trust Would 
Work In Your Personal Family Situation. 



You'll Find Out What Will Happen Wtth A Living Trust... 

^j\ .Your estate will transfer more quickly to your family upon your death. 

©There will be no probate court fees and no probate attorney fees for your 
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(5) You'll avoid guardianship if you become disabled. 

You'll Find Out What Will Happen Without A Living Trust 

(even If you have a wlll)... 

(^ Your estate may go through probate to prove ownership and transfer 
^^ title, delaying distribution to your heirs. 

rrv If your estate is worth more than $50,000, your family may have to pay 
'^^ probate fees. 

T7\ If you're married and your estate is worth more than $600,000 net» your 
O^ family may owe federal estate taxes at rates from 37% to 50%. 

/rr\ If you become incapacialed, or unable to sign documents, the court may 
>Cy assign a guardian to run your estate as it sees fit 

isponsored by: The Law Firm OjPotster And Associates 

A FRIM YOU fcAN TRUST. Polstcr and Associates has prepared hundreds 
of estate plans for families In Illinois like your own. Ilielr practice Is 
focused In the area of estate planning. 

As an educational service to the community, Polster and Associates 
presents a weekly radio show on WKRS 1220 at 1:00 p.m. every Tuesday 
called "Law Talk." 

Seating Is Limited, So Call (708) 223-9200 Now! 









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1993 



Friday,July2, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 3 



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Newspapers 



Victory for protection 
children in Illinois 



of 





The lUinois House of 
Representatives has de- 
feated H& 1081, This bill 
would have exempted 
from licensing all child 
day care programs oper- 
ated by churches and reli- 
gious institutions. 

The State Senate 
passed its version of this 
legislation, SBI49, on 
April 21. Howfever, this bill 
died in the House Execu- 
tive Committee on May 4. 
The defeat of ttiis legisla- 
tion is directly attributable 
to a strong grass roots ef- 
fort on behalf of children 
and families. 

The Child Care Coali- 
tion of Lake County rec- 
ognize that because of the 
issues raised, the defeat of 
these bills took coura- ' 
geous and well-informed 
action on the part of our 
state legislature. While all 
child care and parent ad- 



vocates acknowledge the 
need for more quality, af- 
fordable child care, we 
cannot condone accom- 
plishing this by ellminat- 
in i the protections of 
minimal licensing stan- 
dards. 

The Coalition has 
contacted all of our local 
legislators, thanking those 
who voted against these 
bills and expressing our 
deep disappointment 
with those who voted in 
favor of this ill-advised 
legislation. 

In order to establish a 
dialogue and develop a 
collaborative working re- 
lationship with policy 
makers in Springfield, the 
Child Care Coalition of 
Lake County has offered 
to, meet with legislators to 
discuss the many ciiild 
care issues which are so 
Important to the future of 
our communities. We will 



keep our readers in- 
formed of our progress in 
this regard. 

The following is a 
record of the votes cast by 
legislators in our area ( a 
"no" vote was instrumen- 
tal in the defeat of this 
legislation): 

SB 149 

Robert Churchiil Yes 
Vema Clayton present 
•^Virginia Frederick Yes 
Lauren Beth Gash No 
Andrea Moore Yes 

Margaret ParceUs No 
Al Salvi Yes 

Jeffrey Schoenberg No 
HE 1081 

David Barkhausen Yes 
Adeline Geo-Karis Yes 
Richard Klemm No 

William Peterson Yes 
Grace Mary Stern No 
— by Patricia Goodman, 
Chair, Public Policy 
Committee, Child Care 
Coalition of Lake'County. 



ifeSSSSt 



ooklet aids 





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may, 'he^n«?imilI?^OUt; ciiildl* ckl^^^ 
rpylderf^are available, who can 

'eds. 



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tjf'^ child care options and decide they 
^/Would pxefeklo care for tlielr chiLk«. 

,»e^^^es if they could :om^" 



_^.t. Becoming a family day 
care'provtder enables you to earn 
income.wtiUe caring for your own 
children. 

Family day care is a business. To 
do well in It, v ousim ust^ not^only.; esj-A 
r; joy working v^^^^eh-»d|fa^ 
^V wlUlng;to'speri^p^^^eal of*t^^ 

at horn e, yog^^t b enable. to treat 
4,,< your- work aF^feuslness. You will 
C need to keep proper records of in- 
come and expenses for tax pur- 
poses, establish -policies to' simplify 
your/^doaling,-vyith;parents, and/ln- 
. vcst/infaplp'ropnate toys and^eqMlp' 
*■''"' me'nt You will need insurance. You 



wiU need to make the most of your. ,: 
stret^gthsiand Diinim^^og^ 

support of yoijj^^yjv ti 

it is to your'advantdge to, be U 






censed by the Oep^i^^ 

dren and Famlly/Ser 

Without a license you 

•|-|ci9Jring- for only three 

"-^"^cfudling.t-your'^jowa 





if^Chil:;- 

mpor- 
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tantiy;^If<berising1^si ,, 
you have met standards for 

Scries of4raraiing , sessions to 
prepare you to operate a' family day' 
care home are available' from sev- 
eral sources 
tion, c 



For further informa-j 
_ftGhildt Care Resqllirce? 
and Rei^aR^ncjr^ln your area or 




you local DCFS office. 



Tips for traveling with cliildreh Intei'generational activities 



A long day in the con- 
fined space of a car can be 
fun for everyone. 

Story telling 

•Bring cassette tapes of 
stories from the library. 

•Make up a story with 
everyone in the car 
adding a sentence, one at 
a time, 

•Watch people in 
other cars and play "I 
wonder" telling a possible 
story about that family 
and get Input from odier 
passengers. 
Road games 

•Number search— see 
how far you can count by 
finding numbers In se- 
quence on road signs. 



•Alphabet search — 
same as number search. 

•Watch hcense plats 
and see how many states 
go by. 

•Play "My father owns 
a grocery store" and in it 
he sells.., (think of an item 
and give a clue to the first 
letter of the word). "0" for 
oranges, etc. 

Music 

•Sing-a-longs. 
•Music tapes. 

Snacks 

. 'Plan ahead for 
snacks. Bring cereal to be 
eaten out of the box, 
•Have a water cooler. 
•Bring Juice boxes. 



•Pack healthy foods 
not requiring reMgera- 
tion, fruit, etc, 

•Always have paper 
towels and hand wipes . 

Personal care 

•Carry a porta-potty for 
toilet training youngsters. 

•Pack needed diaper- 
ing supplies. 

•Stop and stretch at 
two-hour intervals. 

•Take turns sitting in 
different places in the car. 

•Have sun shields for 
side windows, 

•Try to maintain a 
schedule similar to home 
for eating and bedtime.— 

by PEGGY STONE 



Kid's I 
inunti 

! The Lake Goui 
League of Womei 
and the Lake Coii 
Health Dept, wh 
eludes the Lake ( 
Child Care Coalj 
co-sponsoring a' 
First Fair" on Au 
Waukegan High 
Brookslde and I 
Waukegan from 
p.m. to help get 
come children ; 
get ready for sc 
younger childr 
ixnmunizatloni 
will be able to 
school physicj 
nlzations, lead 
tal screening, 
hearing screei 
preschoolers, 
supplies, bad 
toys and bool 
preschoolers. 
beabletorej 
obtain Social 
cards, and si 
needed soclt 
from over.ac 
which will fc 
The income 
185 percent 



highlighted in Lake County I ^^ 

Tiie first Lake Cduntv American National Bank •DialoEue with iuniors I ' WV A J 




Stephen T. Reiily, D.D.S. 
John S. Cordell, D.D.S. 



Located In Condell Acute Care Center 

2 East Rollins Rd., Ste. 4 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

"We Cater To Cowards" 

Evening & Saturday Hours 
Insurance Accepted y|^ 



% 









li!)iiiBiHl 




The first Lake County 
Intergeneratlonal Confer- 
ence Is scheduled for Aug. 
10 at the College of Lake 
County, 

The theme, "Forming- 
Intergeneratlonal Partner- 
ships for a Better Amer- 
ica," portrays a basic con- 
cept and perhaps why a 
variety of different pro-, 
grams have developed In 
our coirmiunlty. 

The conference Is 
open to persons inter- 
ested In developing a 
program in their 
agency/business or be- . 
coming a volunteer in 
such a program. We look 
forward to sharing caring 
and learning about what 
is and what could be de- 
veloped. 

The Planning Com- 
mittee Includes: AARP, 
North Shore Chapter; 



American National Bank 
and trust Company of 
Waukegan; Catholic 
Charities of Lake County; 
College of Lake Cotmty; 
Lake County Council of 
Seniors; Lake County 
Healthy Department; 
Northeastern Illinois Area 
Agency on Aging; Project 
Success; Retired Senior 
Volunteer Program of 
Lake County; Senior Ser- 
vices Coalition of Lake . 
County; University of Illi- 
nois Cooperative Exten,- 
sion, Lake County Unit, 
Waukegan Township. 

Concurrent workshops 
will follow the key note 
speaker Maralee Undley, 
director, Illinois De- 
partement on Agbig. 
These Include: 

•Connecting genera- 
tions through math and 
reading. 



Dialogue with Juniors 
and seniors. 

•Charting a new 
course in Intergenera- 
tlonal Care. 

•A therapeutic ap- 
proach to Intergenera- 
tlonal Progranmiing In ; 
long-term care. 

•Hednes Museimi: A . 
shared history. 
. •Grandparent's rights. 

•Substance abuse: An' 
Intergeneratlonal Per- 
spective. 

•Moving forward by 
looking forward: Models 
in generativity. 

•Opportimlties for 
connectiveness. 

For information, or to 
register, call 249-4330 or 
360-6885.— by BARBAM 
HALEY, MA. BSN, RN. 
director, Health Facilities 
DlvlBlon, Lake County 
Eiealth Dept 



School's Out! Celebrate at 




INTRODUCIG SCULPTDRES OeyD MY 

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SNACKBAR 
BIRTHDAY PAPmES 



GOLF 



co-KAfrrs 



651 Lakehurst Dr. 
Waukegan, IL 

(Behind Lakehurst Cinema) 

708-578-5400 

OpenPaily until 1 1:00 p.m,, Weekends until Midnight 



KIDDIE' 
RIDES 





"Meany, SiMaky, 
Roos-A-Fee" 
2 3/5 inches 



For (lie Hrsl time, an exciting and important new 
colleclicn of fine sculptures hoi been created by Hie 
aitiiaas of The Walt Disney Studios. 



A GOOD IMPRESSION IS A GIFT FROM 






34014 Barron Blvd. (Rt, 83), Grayslake 223-0555 



4 Lakotand Newspapers 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



'■mi i£iJiii«'J*i*i;*ite»Amtei'^^as;! 



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Kiefs First I'air provides 
immunizations^ screenings 






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es 




h'junlors 



lew 
3nera- ; 

icap- 
jenera- 
ming Jn - 

seiim: A . 

at*s rights, 
abuse: An 
lal Per- 

ward by 
i: Models 

ties for 



)tion,orto 
9-4330 or 
BARBABA 
SN, RN. 
thFaclimes 
County 



ust learn to 
ie cats" 

3/4 Inches 



j The Lake Goimty 
, League of Women Voters 
\ and the Lake County 
Health DepL, which in- 
cludes the Lake County 
Child Care Coalition, are 
co-sponsoring a "Kid's 
FhstFah"onAug.ll, at 
Waukegan High School, 
Brookside and McAree. in 
Waukegan from 2 to 8 
p.m. to help get low in- 
come children ages 0-14 
get ready for school and 
younger children needed 
immunizations. Children 
will be able to get free 
school physicals, immu- 
nizations, lead tests, den- 
tal screening, speech and 
hearing screening for 
preschoolers, school 
supplies, backpacks and 
toys and books for 
preschoolers. Parents will 
be able to register to vote, 
obtain Social Security 
cards, and sign-up for 
needed social services 
from over 30 agencies 
which will be attending. 
The income guideline is 
185 percent of poverty. 



which means. a family of 
four could earn up to 
$26,547 gross income and 
qualify for these services. 
Transportation to the fair 
will be available from 
central locations around 
the county. Translators 
will also be available. 

Children must be ac- 
companied by a parent or 
guardian. They must bring 
their children's immu- 
nization record and proof 
of income and residency 
in Lake County. If they 
wish a voter'", registration 
card, they need two forms 
of ID, one with a current 
address. Social Security 
requires a variety of doc- 
uments; for adults a birth 
certificate plus a drivers 
license, or credit card or 
rent receipt; for children, 
a birth certificate plus a 
report card, Immuniza- 
tion record, or doctor's 
bill, or hospital record or 
blrdi announcement for 
babies. For non-citizens, 
Social Security requires . 
INS papers, green card 



and passport 

Volunteers for the 
Kid's First Fair are 
needed. These will in- 
clude lay people as well as 
nurse practitioners, 
nurses, physicians, den- 
tists, hygienists, and lab 
tech5. Translators \n^o 
speak Spanish and En - 
^ish Wll be needed. 

Students from seven 
schools in Lake County 
have donated school 
supplies and Abbott Labs, 
Coral Foundations, Hewitt 
Associates, Hollister, 
Kemper, Montgomery 
Ward, Premark, Walgreen, 
Baxter, American National 
Bank of Ubertyville and 
Waukegan School Dist 
No. 60 have generously 
donated funds, or in-kind 
goods or services. 

Volunteers may call 
Sharon Doney at the 
Health Department, 360- 
6716. People needing 
transportation must call 
the League at 433-8855 by 
July 31. For general infor- 
mation call 433-8655. 



What is parenting and 
why is it so important? 




When do our parent- 
ing skills develop? Are we 
beginning with the first 
babysitting job? Are we 
learning skills throughout 
childhood when we stand 
beside our parents in the 
kitchen learning to pre- 
pare a balanced meal? Are 
we developing skills as we 
care for and assume re- 
sponsibilities with feed- 
ing or walking a pet? In 
the classroom when we 
hear about treating others 
as you would like to be 
treated, are we teaching a 
basic concept in caring for 
others? Why is there no' 
degree or specific course - 
work that helps become 
good parents? 

In her book, "When 
the Bough Breaks," Sylvia 
Ann Hewlett issues a 
. solemn warning to all of 
us. "A nation that allows 
large numbers of its chil- 
dren to grow up in 



poverty, afOicted by poor 
healtii, handicap ped by 
inferior education, de- 
serted fathers, cut adrift by 
society— this nation asks 
for and gets chaos." Our 
task in the 1990's is to 
create conditions that al- 
low children to flourish. 

"T/Ve must support par- 
ents and reconstruct the 
, family as the cornerstone 
of society; then and only 
then can we heal the 
wounds of our young and 
knit together the fabric of 
this nation." 

Her action plan is built 
upon four key Ingredients; 
Give top billing to fami- 
lies with children, invest 
in the future and devote 
more resources to chil- 
dren, hold parents ac- 
countable, Jind no new 
taxes. 

^arly childhood edu- . 
cation has a 30 percent 



rate of return. Hewlett in- 
dicates that badly edu- 
cated people undermine 
the prosperity of the na- 
tioa A wasted life costs 
upward of $300,000 when 
you add in welfare 
charges and expenses of 
the penal system. 

"If we cherish our 
children, they will add to 
the wealth and strength of 
our country; if we neglect 
our children , they v^dll 
drag this nation down." 

We must strengthen 
our families and because 
one half of what a human 
beging leams*!rom birth 
to age 17 is learned before 
age four. Parents are their 
children's most important 
teachers. Parenting is the 
most important job in our 
lifetime and one for 
which we must work at 
learning how to do well.— 
by BARBAJRA HALEY 



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Friday, Ju!y 2, 1993 




Protectin: 

from heai^nd mm 



Heat exhaustion 

Heat exhaustion, or heat stroke 
occurs when too much body heat is 
built up from spending too much 
time in the heat Even if not directly 
in the sun, a person can build up 
excessive body heat by staying out- 
doors too long on a hot day or in- 
sidie a place that has become overly 
'hot When such exposure is com- 
bined with strenuous physical ac- 
tivity, the risk of exhaustion is even 
greater. 

Symptoms of heat exhaustion 
include: dizziness, nausea, light 
headedness, severe headache, pale 
face, cool clammy skin, heavy per- 
spiration, shallowed breathing, 
pulse weak, thready, rapid. 

Recommended treatment for 
heat exhaustion is: lay the person 
on his back in a cool place, loosen 
tight clothing, apply cool cloths, if 
symptoms do not abate within 
minutes, or become worse, get 
medical attention immediately. 

To prevent heat exhaustiofi: 
drink extra fluids to help replace 
body fluid lost through perspira- 
tion. Preferably, water, fruit juices or 
fruit based beverages, stay indoors, 
postpone strenuous activity, loose- 
fitting clothing. 

Sunstroke 

Sunstroke is caused by overex- 
posure to direct sunlight, with or 
without physical activity. Just sitting 
or lying in the sun too long can re- 




Mi 



'■I 



suit in sunstroke. 

Symptoms of sunstroke are: red, 
dry face; skin hot to touch; high 
body temperature; slow noisy 
breatfiing; loss of consciousness in 
extreme cases. 

Treatment for sunstroke Is: place 
the person on his back in the shade, 
loosen tight clotiiing, apply cool 
cloths, sponge skin, get medical at- 
tention. 

Prevention of sun stroke: protect 
from over-exposure to the ultravio- 
let rays of the sun. Limit time spent 
in the sun, use suntan lotion, wear 
dark glasses. 

For more information contact 
the Lake County Health Facilities 
Division, 360-6733. 



Letters to the Editor 



Special thanks 

Editor 

While Lwas very 
pleased at your mention 
of the success of the Week 
of the Young Child event 
at Gumee Mills, I need to 
add a sidebar and that is I 
did not work alone. Spe- 
cial thanks need to go to 
the committee Including 
Cherron Chambers of 
Deerhaven, Marge 
Cololough and Nadine 
Conti from St Therese, . 
and Sue Lo Savio from 
Busy Bee. These members 
not only oifered the assis- 
tance and support for or- 
ganizing the event, they 
participated in every re- 



quest I made of them and 
never said they were too 
busy. Providing the teach- 
ers to perform In skits, 
facepainting, songs and 
just having staff members 
and families from their 
centers attend made It a 
true effort of camaraderie! 



I look forward to a contin- 
ued collaboration with 
such a wonderful group of 
professional colleagues 
and hope for 1994's event 
to be an equal success! 

Charlene Ackerman 

Paul K. Kennedy 

Child Care Center 






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Lakeland Newspapers 5 



• 


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Upservice is a phone-in colwnn presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no 
claim to the authenticity cftlte statements. Lakeland 
' Newspapers does not claim the content or the subject matter 
as fact, but as the personal opinion of the caller. Lakeland 
Newspapers reserves the rigiU to edit copy or to refrain from 
printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 and leave your 
message 24-hours a day. Although the call is anonymous, 
please leave your village name.' 

Mad Mom 

I think that the "Once Upon A Time" person is rude 
and inconsiderate. By your conunents, you must be 
from Round Lake. You are also ignorant, I am a young 
mother of two and have always taught my children to 
respect others property and feelings. You make me sick. 
You are a typical Round Lake uncaring, irresponsible 
parent. 

Regular Reader 

It is 5:30 p.m. on a Friday evening and I am reading 
Lipservice. I do this at that time every Friday. I want 
to say Hi to Tammy who also is reading this right now. 
■ We both love your paper. I am Bonnie. 

Thanks For The Warning 

I called to thank you to tell us about the warning that a . 
child molester is being released in our area. I only wish 
you could have been more specific, even though I know 
you can't. I feel that parents have the right to know this 
information. I will now be more vigilant. And Mr. 
Molester, if ever you come near my kids, you are dead. 
No questions asked. 

What's In A Name 

It seems the businesses and residential interests in 
Mundelein cannot think of a better name than using the 
name Heritage Center conflicting with the Heritage 
Center of Fort Hill. The HCFH houses a museum made 
possible by the untiring efforts of the owner. Perhaps 
" the village of Mundelein should have a contest for a 
better name. 



Less Depressed 



I am calling from Round Lake Beach. In the past 5ve 
years I have gone from feeling depressed about living in 
this town to becoming very excited about its direction. 
I with all the exciting things going on, Mayor Davis 
can sling-shot this place into a hot commodity. Please 
don't screw that up. Take a good look at what's going 
on. 

No Teen Center 

Is Carol Deneke out of her mind? She is askfng 
Round Lake to give her $52,000 a year so she can have 
a teen center for 20 children. You can't create a new 
taxing body without voter approval. I am already 
paymg the park district $250 a year in taxeii. Can't the 
teens go there? 

Not For Kids 

I want parents to know that the new movie, "Jurassic 
Park" is not a movie you want to take young children to. 
The commercials are veiy misleading. It is great for 
teens and up. But, it terrifies young children. It has 
dinosaurs eating children and it is very violent Don't be 
fooled by the commercials. 

Need More Volunteers 

I agree that the Antioch Rescue Squad would be better 
if they could read the numbers along with street names 
in a lot of areas. But, lets be honest here, that person 
said God bless these men and women. There is only one 
woman on the Antioch Rescue Squad. And that is all 
they will ever have unless people get involved. * 

Back Off 

Maybe Round Lake Beach should back off of Kxistoffs! 
.Everyone complains when the kids have nothing to do. 
• Round Lake complains ofa gang problem. They are 
now arguing about a teen center. But, they want to stop 
the go-carts. Is someone picking on Kristofs? 

Been There 

I want to say to the "Flash Point" person that my son 
does have a disability. I chose hot to force him on the 

6 Lakoland NowtFfapor$ 



iceless hockey team. They cannot accommodate him or 
guarantee his safety. I place him in activities that he 
can succeed. 

Little League Blues 

I just watched my son's game at the Avon Youth 
Baseball Complex. The umpire made several bad calls 
and the game should have been contested. But, the 
coach can't do that because several parents have already 
made complaints and the coach might lose his job. The 
parents are wrong and we support this coach. 



Wants Limits Enforced 



I have called before, and want the Antioch police to 
pay more attention to the speeding that is gomg on in 
town. When parking on the street, the driver takes his 
life into his hands when exiting the car! Some speeding 
car or truck will surely come by almost killing a person 
and ripping off the door. The posted speed limits m 
town are under 30 mph! Worse yet, this is going on in 
front of the station. Why don't you guys hold a radar 
gun out your front window? 
(Continued on page 16) 



^s.'Cai; 



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(708)223^073 

I liko County* rnost poptior Town 
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ews 



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For more information, call (708) 223-8161 



Poppy I 

The AntiocH 
sell poppies in 
Friday, July 2, 
Poppies are mat 
and^ poppy sate 
and needy vctcr 

ehristig 

Antioch C 
wUl hold it's 
July 15, 12 
Hogan's Rest 
N.Rtc. 59, / 
post-prom 
* mother/daug 
prom-enade c 
'by high schc 
tertaimnentl 
daughter Ad 
will be Coll 
who shares 
otion." Fre( 
children 10 
vation, call 
at 223-608 
must be hoi 
a friend! 

Propc 

The Ant' 
an execui 
village J 
session, U 
village a* 
sales con 
undisclof 
property* 
safety. 

Mee 

The 
meeting 
because 
meetinj 
6 inst 
cveninj 
7:30 p. 



Pr 



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Friday, July 2. 1993 



To 




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ding 
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Poppy Day 



The Anaoch VFW Post 4551 will 
sell poppies in the Antioch area on 
Friday, July 2, and Saturday, July, 3. 
Poppies are made by disabled veterans 
and' poppy sales benefit hospitalized 
and ne«ly veterans. 

Christian women 

-Antioch Christian Women's Club 
will hold it's luncheon on Thursday, 
July 15, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at 
Hogan's Restaurant located at 40150 
N. Rte. 59, Antioch. There will be a 
post-prom fashion show and 
mother/daughter luncheon with a 
prom-enade of prom fashions modeled 
'by high school students. Musical en- 
tertainment by Susan Becker and, her 
daughter Adriane. The guest speaker 
will be Colleen O'Comior of Palatine, 
who shares her "PROM-ised PROM- 
otion." Free nursery is provided for 
children 10 and undfn'. to make a reser- 
vation, call Gloria at 548-2686 or Pam 
at 223-6085 by July 8. Reservations 
'must be honored, canceled, or used by 
afiriend! 

Property purchase 

The Antioch Village Board retired to 
an executivp; session during the last 
village board meeting. In that 
session, the board decided to have the 
village attorney, Ken Clark prepare 
sales contracts for the purchase of two 
undisclosed pieces of property. The 
property's proposed use is for public 
safety. 

Meeting changed 

The first Antioch Village Board 
meeting of July will be rescheduled 
because of the national holiday. The 
meeting will be held on Tuesday, July 
6 instead of the usual Monday 
evening. The meeting will begin at 
7:30 p.m. at the village hall. 

Appointments 

Mayor Shineflug has appointed a 
select committee of Trustees to work 
with the village administrator in 
formulating personnel procedures. 
Trustees Amundsen, Forcsta, and 
' Oldcnburger have been selected. 

Presentation 

The United States Environmental 
Protection Agency is planning an 
informational presentation about work 
occ.urring at the land fill site in 
Antioch. The presentation will be 
held on July 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. in 
the Antioch village hall. 

Historical officers 

The Lakes Region Historical 
Society announced officers for the 
1993-94 year. They arc: President 
Tom Pienika, Vice President Janet 
Brook, Recording Secretary Barbara 
Beesc, Corresponding Secretary Al 
Little, Treasurer Ted Sokulski, 
Trustees (two-year term) Nancy Binder 
and Wanda Hauber, (one-year term) 
Mary Beth Walsh and Robin Kessel. 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Rivals are ready for Fourth 

A practice session tor the Fourth of July lug-of-War between 
the Antioch Lions Club and the Antioch Rescue Squad gels 
ugly on the lawn of the Jensen House restaurant. Rivals 
threw eggs and shavirig cream at each other. Claude 
LeMere, Fourth of July chairperson, suffered a black eye. 
Ted Axton and LeMere, "representing the Lions Club say 
they're ready to face the Rescue Squad and get even at 4 
p.m. on the Fourth. The losing team In the tug-of-war will be 
hosed off by ladles In bikinies. —Photos by Mary Phillips and 
Gene Gabry 




Df stricfS4 to fight food fees 



by TINA SWIECH 

Lakeland Newspapers 

. The Antioch School DisL 34 will ap- 
peal a decision by the County Board 
members and £ounty Health Committee 
after they denied the request by the school 
not to impose license fees for the cafeteria 
food permits. The appeal will take place 
July 28, according to Dist. 34 Superin- 
tendent Donald Skidmore, aiming towards 
Lake County Health Dept officials. 

"We feel the fees are unnecessarily ex- 
pensive compared to others in the 
county," said Skidmore. He e^Lplained the 
that three out of the four schools m Anti- 
och, including the upper grade school and 
the lower grade school currently have to 
pay the same amount in license fees that a 



large 200-seating capacity restaurant pays. 
Skidmore called this "ludicrous" because 
he said, the schools' cafeteria is only opeo 
for one hour per day to serve lunch to stu- 
dents, and many of the restaurants are 
open 365 days out of the year. 

The largest restaurant annually pays a 
fee to the County Health Dept of $375, 
the same that the Antioch schools are told 
to pay- a total amiual cost of $1,396 in 
Health Dept fees, which has forced the 
Antioch schools to stick to their guns and 
protest the amount, petitioning tiie entity 
that grants food permits, for a waiver of 
the fees. 

ApparenUy, Uiis is the second time in 
the last 16 years that the Lake County 



Health Dept has imposed the high license 
fees for the cafeterias, according to offi- 
cials. In 1988, they attempted, but then 
discontinued them due to public outcry. 
This time, th*school board is willing 
again to fight for what they believe in, 
according to Skidmore, Officials noted 
tiiat after bills for food mspection permits 
were received, several sdiools andinunic- 
ipalities turned around and billed the 

county for using their buildings as 
polling places. Skidmore said, "The 
county election board is not going to go 
with fees imposed for polling places." 
The Superintendent explained that tiiere is 
an unwritten covenant witii respect to 
polling places. 



No-wake issued on all Chain lakes 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The Chain O' Lakes Waterway 
Management Agency, in response to an 
increasing number of wake related injuries 

and property damage, passed an emergency 
no-wake zone on Chain lakes until waters 
recede. 

According to Karen Kabbes, tiie 
agency's executive cTircctor, the high water 

from heavy June rains forced the board to 
hold Uic emergency meeting on June 26 
and pass Uie no- wake zone, which extends 
150 feet from the shoreline of all Chain 
lakes. 

"We are looking at die high water 



situation on a daily basis," said Kabbes. 

Kabbes added that the board will look 
into passing a permanent no-wake zone at 
a future board meeting, in response to 
complaints about damage to piers and 
other private property near the shoreline. 
According to Kabbes a public hearing on 
the issue will occur before the board 
passes such an ordinance'. 

"The high water has accentuated an 
ever increasing problem," said Chain 0' 
Lakes Waterway Agency Chairman Dr. 
William Dam. 

Similar ordinances, according to Dam, 



are in effect on many lakes in Illinois 
primarily for safety. Other reasons for Uie 
no-wake zone include shoreline 
protection, and to allow a safe haven for 
swimmers and fishermen. 

In other Chain news, the board 
removed the no-wake restrictions on the 
Fox River from Pisiakec Lake souUi to 
the Slratton Lock and Dam. 

"Water levels should drop enough this 
week to lift the no- wake restriction from 
the locks soutii to the Algonquin Dam," 
said Kabbes. 



Lakeland Newspapers 



(USPS 027-080) 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Omco ot Publication: 30 South Whitney SL. Qrayslake, IL 
60030. PhoM (708) 223-8161 . 

PuliJIshed weekly, aecofxl dau postage paid at Orayslake, 
; IL 60030. 

Mall Sut)salptlon Rates: '16.50 Per Year by Mall paid In ad- 
vance In Lake, Cook Kenosha and McHenry Counties; else- 
wtwfe "22.00 Per Year by Moll paid In advance. 

Postmaslsf: Send address changes lo Anboch Mows- 
Roponer, 30 South Whltmy Street, P.O. Box 268, Graya- 
laks. Illinois 60030. 

(708)223-8161 



Vernon HHIs News 
Round Lake News 
Wauconda Leader 
LIbertyvllle News 
Llndenhurst News 
North Chicago Tribune 
Warren-Newport Press 
M.R, SCHROEDER 

Foundef-1904-1988 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

PuUisher/Presktont 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

General Manager 



Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundeleln News 
Graysiake Times 
Fox Lake Press 
Gumee Press 






JIU.I»ePASQU/Ui 

JO DAVIS 
faattnjUgr 



BOBSCKROEDEH 

QmJilsnUg' 

SHARON ZASAOIL 



ANNM.nOBEnTS 
ELIZABETH EBEBT 

ftefcflrt»OijUiit«brlsMjf 



Riverboat casino issue 
may be settle'd in July 



by MARY FOLEY 

Lakeland Newspapers 

With the last legal impediment out of 
the way, it is possible that the last casino 
license will be issued at the July 20 
meeting of the Illinois Gaming 
Commission. 

While the agenda for the meeting will 
not be prepared until July 12, insiders 
believe the issue may finally be settled at 
this board meeting. 

The board meeting will take place in 
Chicago and it is expected that there will 



be presentations by all four applicants. In 
addition, time will be scheduled for 
presentations "for" and "against" the 
various casino locations. The sites 
vying for the license are Elgin, W. 
Dundee, Antioch, and Molinc. 

The public affairs office of the gaming 
commission will not verify if the license 
issue will appear on the agenda. 
However, Laurie Jenson of Fox Riverboat 
Limited Paruiership commented, "I would 
think that it is very likely to be 
discussed." 












^li^ 






1 I.- 



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■rIiiay,Juiy2, 1993 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 7 



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Wayne Olsen, Jr., Therese Durkin, to 



Wedding bells 

Wayne and Marlen 
Olsen of Antioch are very 
excited over the upcoming 
wedding of theif-fifth child 
and only son^ Wayne 
Olsen, Jr.- ."Little" Wayne 
will be marrying. Theresa 
Durkin, on July 31 at St. 
Stephen Lutheran Church. 

Wayne and Theresa are 
both graduates of ACHS 
and long-time Antioch area 
residents. The reception 
will be at Mentone's and 
the dejay will be Jerry 
Coia. The bridesmaids will 
be Christine Davis, Sandy 
Green and Nancy Caudle. 
The groomsmen will be 
Tommy Hucker, Jim Foer- 
ster and Roy Trout, Little, 
beautiful Lauren Foerster 
will be the flower girl and 
handsome little Adam 
Durkin will be the ring 
bearer. ' 

Registration 

The Antioch Parks and 
Recreation Department 
sponsors the Gamp Crayon 
Program. Camp Crayon is 
not a preschool, but a two- 
day a week social experi- 
ence for preschoolers ages 
3, 4 and 5. 

The program runs from 



-mid September ' through 
mid May and each session 
is six weeks/12 days long. 

Hometown 
Goodies 




There are five "sessions, and 
the cost of each six week 
session is Village Resi- 
dents $55, Township Resi- 
dents .$65 and but of Anti- 
och residents $75. 

There are three time/day 
choices available, Mon- 
day/Wednesday mornings, 
8:30 a.m. through 11:30 
a.m.; Tuesday/Thursday- 
morning 8:30 aim. through 



11:30 a.m.;: and Tues- 
day/Thursday afternoons, 
12:30: p.m. through 3:30. 

p.m. \. , r 11 

Registration for the fall 
session will be held at the 
Village Hall on Saturday, 
August 7 and a non-refund- 
able $25 deposit is required 
at the time of registration. 
For more information con- 
cerning the time of registra- 
tion etc., please contact 
Carol Todd at 395-2160. 
Baby makes three 

Can and Nick Maloof 
are expecting their first 
baby in January. This will 
be Celia and Victor Ben- 
nett's first grandchild and 
the first niece or nephew of 
Leslie Bennett. Naturally 
everyone is very excited 
over this' upcoming blessed 
family event. Congratula- 
tions and keep us posted. 
Help 

For die first time ever, 
I decided to create a peren- 
nial flower garden, I still 
planted my usual annual 
favorites in flower pots and 
wash tubs, petunias, 
marigold, impatience and 
moss roses. As usual they 
get prettier each day. How- 
ever, my perennial flower 



garden .is^at a .stand , still,. 
The plants that took are 

. progressing very slowly. I 
will wait a little longer, 
but it appears that several 
of the plants are actually 
dead or close to it 

Any suggestions on 
creating a successftil peren- 
nial garden that will pro- 
duce a beautiful show of 
color from early spring un- 
til frost? How many years 
does it take for a perennial 
plant to spread in order that 
each variety takes up plenty 
of its own space? I will be 
waiting for your helpful 
suggestions. 

Grandpa's boy 

Grandma Elaine Lasky 
stopped for a short visit ac- 
companied by her two year 



old grandson, Kyle Robert 
Sweeney. His last name 
may be Sweeney, but he 
definitely has a lot of the 
Lasky blood running 
through his veins. He 
looks like a tiny version of 
Grandpa Bob and at the rate 
he is growing, it won't be 
long before he will be ready 
to accompany grandpa on a 
fishing exhibition. With a 
little time and practice, he 
will be reelirig in a whop- 
per muskie right along 
with gramps. - 

Happy Birthday 

As you read this col- 
umn it is almost the 
Fourth of July. Please re- 
member while fireworks are 
beautifiil to watch, they can 




also be extremely dangei 
ous. So if you plan'a backl 
yard gathering, please pro 
ceed with caution as the lit' 
tie ones enjoy the beauty ol 
their sparklers during the] 
evening hours. 

As usual a new month 
brings with it my happy 
birthday wishes for many 
Antioch area residents. 
Happy July Birthday to 
Frankie Deates, Carl Dun- 
frund, Jr., Lisa Falcone, 
Michelle Gossell, Katie 
HartI, Josh Lass, Kjersten 
Martens, Joey McNamara, 
Billy Miller, "Teri Mozal, 
Helen Olechny, Deanna 
Olenick, Gina Rossi, Jenny 
Santiemmo, Ctmstian Vo- 
gel and Frank Walsh, Sr. 
Have a good one. 




AUGS names honor students 



Antioch Upper Grade 

School names students to 

the honor roll. 
Sixtii Grade 

High Honor Roll: Bradley 
Amundsen, Katie Anderson, 
Thomas Baird, Monica Basche, 
Gavin Burke, Kenneth Cichon, 
Denise Colby, Trevor Crivello, 
Dena Cucrco, ScoU Dalton.^m- 
bcr Dusak, JJ. Jarrctt Edwards, 
Fred Fcttingcr, Kevin Fielder, Stc- 
fanic Foresta, Lindy Gaylor, 
Vanessa Golladay, Eric Green, 
Luke Haley, Linda Harmon, 
Krista Mintz, Kristen Hungarland. 

Christin Huspcn, Jamie Jor- 
genscn, Steve Latino, Bradlcv 
Marchildon, Rebecca McNeill, 
Anthony Monteleone, Maureen 
Moran, Derek Oleson, Edward 
PIcse, Erin Ricpe, Kathr^ Rogers, 
Edward Rotchford, Jodie Schultz, 
Jennifer Sheble, Jessica Sladek, 
Rebecca Sosnowski, Erin Walsh, 
Jamie Wismer. 

Regular Honor Roll: Emily 
Ayre, Patricia Bcemcr, Alex 
Berger, John Besller, Rebecca 
Birren, Erin Boodcy, Brian 
Borchers, Melissa Burgess, Paul 
Cavanaugh, Marc Colatrino, 
Kevin Collins, Jake Cramond, 
Nicole Daugherty, William Delve, 
Shaun Dexheimer, Meghan D;^er, 
Laura Eaton, Jessica Frazier, 
Megan Gaca, Samantha Griffin, 
Joshuj Oroclscma, Jennifer Groth. 

Heide Haag, Brian Haley, 
Colin Haley, Kelly Haley, 
Samantha Hall, Laura Harvey, 
Sarah Hilger, Richard Hill, 
Thomas Jehlicka, Tiffany Kap- 
salis, Matthew Klinger, Matthew 
Koss, Rachel Kotrba, Jesse 
Kruziriski, Katie LaPlante, Lance 
Mchaffcy, Daniel Pasicwicz, Na- 
dia Pawlowski, Timothy Phelps, 
Nicole King, Scott Rubens, Kevin 
Ruuhela, Esther Scheurer, Re- 
becca Scribner, Jaclyn Seymour, 
Brandy Simpkins, Bo Stancill, Lau- 
ren Stcinburg, Bennie Woodcll. 
Seventh Grade . 

High Honor Roll: Abigail 
Alder, Christina Barbie, Ricky 
Brose, Lesli Chetcrbok, Nicole 
Comer, Michelle Elliott, Amy Eng, 
Kristin Frank, Amanda Gannon, 
David Gooch, Jeremy. Grace, 
■ Jennifer Gussarson, Shawn 
Hansen, Tammy Karg, Shoshanoh 



Kent, Karen Knigge, John 
Krupka, Kelly Kurtz, Susan Lef- 
felman. 

Emily Levin, Erik Lips, Kristin 
Lynch, Joshua Mack, Jennifer Mi- 
nor. Anna Morley, Michael 
Nielsen, Kristin Scopel, Tamara 
Siwula, Amanda Skofstad, Charlie 
Suangka, Kristen-Terhune, Daniel 
Tranter, Meagan Tripp, Sarah 
Trovillion, Amy Vanderkooy, 
Donald Vogel, Lindscy West, Ja- 
son Yasz, Amber Zclinski. . 

Regular Honor Roll: Jacob 
Bartusch, David Borchers, .Jr., 
Brionna Brandt. Shannon Carlin, 
Angela Clark, Alexis Dayhuff, 
Cathlecn Defer, HcsUher Donald, 
Richard Doolittle, Danielle Evcrs, 
Corey Fauser, Annemarie Gcer, 
Robert Glen IV, Christine Gob- 
lirsch, Elizabeth Good, Brian Go- 
crle, John Horan, Kimbcrly Ko- 
ran, Reginald Hughes, Jennifer 
Jaspcrson, Richard J. Jordan, Eliz- 
abeth Kai, Stephanie Kane, Sara 
Kapsalis, Michael Korczyk, Sarah 
Krause, Nicole Langley, Eric 
Luddcn, Kim Malkamaki, Kelly 
Meyer, Johnathan Mitchell, Niraj 
Patel, Jennifer Picfer, January 
Portteus, Stacie Rex, Theodore 
Springer, Molly Welch, Kyle 
Wisniewski, Victoria Zupan. 
Eighth Grade 

High Honor Roll; Rebecca 
Ayre, Chris Belter, Erica 
Bonovitz, Shana Brown, Kevin 
Carlin, Jcffery Crivello, Apostolos 
Diamantopoulos, Ahmet Elez, 
Alyssa Griffin, Melissa Hague, 
Teresa Hebron, Stephen Hovey, 
Bryan Koch, Rebecca Kroeker, 



Nicole Larscn, Erin Laudcnslager, 
Sophia Liarakos, John Lueck, 
Colleen McCandless, Jeanna 
Miller, Francesca Monteleone, 
Elizabeth Moyano. Stacy Oleson, 
Ritesh Patel, Debbie Perry, Kelly 
Phelps, Christopher Placko, Sean 
Robertson, Emily Reuter, Kathryn 
Rosen, Lisa Rudin, Emily Schnclle, 
Christie Wcnszell, Steven Weston, 
Chris Wirsing, Joshua Zahora, Ste- 
fanie Zcrbst. 

Regular Honor Roll: Brian 
Bamett, Jason Bolton, Kyle Bur- 
netie. Chaneice Cermak, Linda 
DeSalvo, Rodney Dupont, 
Nicholas Fetting, Shane Fielder, 
Matthew Fleming, Brian Forth, 
Scott Grabowski,- Stephanie 
Haenchen, Lenny Hagenow, 
Kelly Hahn, Jennifer Haras, Steve 
Harrison, Lauren Hilger, Chery) 
Jackson, Courtney Johnson, 
Noreen Johnson. Michael Keefe, 
Jason Krenke, Mike Lenczuk, 
Tammy Lind, Oiristopher Lindom, 
"Amanda Loyd, Alec McKinley, 
Shawn Meade, Kristine Miedema, 
Liam Moran, Daniel Mottensen, 
Kathryn Ncrroth, Michael Nobler, 
Chris Olandese, Arin Picard, 
Blake Pfau, Andrew Piskator, 
Nicole Robertson, Christopher 
Ruggiero, Christopher Schultz. 
Melissa Simbrowsky, April Smith, 
Jamie Sobie, Alexander Wcstcr- 
gaard, Rebecca Wilke. 




The use of C 
credited with h^ 
Antioch resident 
Mark Simmon 
car June 27 at 
Gumee, 
Gumee Fire C 
the use; of C 
witnesses. 
"He (Simmor 
If he needed 
significant," W 
Simmon was 
Medical Cente 
Simmon's ol 
down. 

In another ai 
McAndrew ( 
transported I 
Hansen Roac 
'- McGralhsa' 
vcHicle was 
could not bb 
over. A hei 
bags were u! 



U.KU) 



Left, Roger Manderschein, executive vice president, and IHandy Miles, 
president of State BanS of Antioch award scliolarship to Justin Calabrese, 

Calabrese receives scholariship 
from State Bank of Antioch 







The Sute Bank of Antioch scholar- 
ship to the College of Lake County was 
awarded this year to Justin Calabrese. 

Calabrese, 1993 graduate of Antioch 
Community High School, achieved a 
high academic standing and has partici- 
pated in a wide range of school and com- 
munity service activities. 

He plans to spend his first two years 
of college at CLC and continue his stud- 
ies at the University of Wisconsin, Park- 
side, toward a masters degree in Molecular 



Biology. 

Each year, since 1990, the Stale Bank 
of Antioch program has awarded a two- 
year fuU scholarship, including tuition 
and books, to an ACHS graduate plannuig 
to attend Uie College of Lake County. 

Criteria for awarding the scholarship 
include scholastic achievement, school ac- 
tivities, community service and financial 
need 

Justin's parents are Charles and Betty 
Calabrese of Antioch. 



rAdbnVCRl 

Repoir Service 



I Fiee Estimates On Repairs 
I Guaranteed Work 



We Recycle 
Microwaves and'VCRsI 




\ 838-6261 \ 

I IIQiWttiolRttSSOnGiiaUilInd J 
AriOmtUiaCdnipinlti'AcmiFromShndiiHouM | 

! . Amloch Loca don open Wi»«i(anctiOnV ! 
5 2n<J LoMion In Fox Itka •CM 973^3699 ■ 



For Maximum Energy 
Efficiency, Clean and Check 
Your AIR CONDITIONER 
Annually By A licensed Technician 
Call Now for appt.: 395-2460 

A.A ANDERSON K"?J! 

25819 W. Grass L^ke Rd., Antioch, IL 
FULL SERVICE FOR YOUR ENVIRONMENT 



Qracaland Bapllit Chu^xn, :£6 Ida SL, AnUoch, IL 
Sunday School 1 1 a.m., Mofning Wonhip 1 1 a.m., 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robert Wiaiaim, Pattor. 

FInt Church or Christ, Sctanliit & Roading Bmi, Rta. 
173 and Harden, Antioch. Phone (708) 39S-1 196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Sarvic* 10;30 ajn. Wednesday, 6 
p.nn. 

Calvary Biptlit Church, 554 Parkway, Phons (708) 39&- 
3393. Sunday School 10 a.m„ Sunday Worship 11 a.m. 
and 7 p.m. Pastor, Rev. Lloyd Q. Mou, Jr. 

St. iQnatlua Epiacapal, 977 Main St., Phone (708) 395- 
0652. Low Mass 7:30 a.m., High Mass 9:30 a.m. Sunday 
SehcMl A Nursery 9:X a.m. 

Antioch EvangellcBl Fraa Church, Trftany Rd., Phono 
(708) 395-4117; Sunday School 9:30 a.m., Sunday 
Worship 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.iT!., Chlldran'a Church 11 a.ra 
Nursery l»lh services. Awana Club, 6:30 p.m. 
Wftdnaaday. 

St. Stephin Luthartn Church, HIRilde & Rla. 59 Phons 
(708) 39&-3^9. Sunday Worship, S and 10:30 a.m. 
Church School 0:16 a.m., Sunday Rev. Charles E. Milter, 
pastor, 

ChrlBllan Lira Fallowahip AaaambtlH olOod Church, 
41625 Deep Uka Rd., Antioch. Phona (708) 395-B572. 
Sunday School (aU ages) 9 a.m., Sunday Morning 
Wonhip 10 a.m., ChlWron'a Church 10 a.m, Sunday 
Evening Worship 6:30 p.ra, Wednesday Wotihlp & 







ChSdron's Program 7'a.m., Tues. Wonwn's Fellowship & 
Bible Study 9-1 1:30 a.m. Jeft Brussaly, Pastor. 

Faith Evangaltcil Luthtran, 1275 Main St. Phona (708) 
395-1500. Sunday Worship B & 10:30 a.m., Sunday 
School 9:25 a.m., Mon. 7 pjn. Rav. Darald Qruen, Rev. 
Qregory Herrrwnton, Paston. Christian Day School (708) 
39S-1664. 

Mllltiurn Conorasatlanil United Church of Chrtat, 
Grass Lake Rd. at Rt. 45 Phona (708) 3S6-S237. Sunday 
servjctf 10 a.ta ChiUren'a program 10 a.m. Rev, Paul R. 
Mellzer, Pastor, 

United Mathodtst Church ol Antioch, 836 Main St. 
Phona (708) 395-1269. Worship at 8:30 a.m. i 10:45 a.m. 
Church School • dasse* tor all ages, 9:30 a.m. The Rev. 
Kurt A. Qarritn, Pastor. '• 

St. Pater'a Church, 557 W. Lake St., Antioch. Phone 
(708) 395-0274. Masses we«kdays, 7:15 & B a.m, 
Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30, 1 1 a.ia & 1 2: 1 5 p.ra Saturday 5:30 

p.m. Pastor Rev. Father Lawrence Hanley. 

Chain of Likta Community Biblo Church, 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd„ Anikxh, Phono (708) 838-0103 Sunday 
Worship: 8:15 and 10:45. Sunday School: 9:45. Chitdron'a 
Church: 10:45, Youth, Wormn'a Awana & Small Group 
ministries. Senior Pastor, Rev. Don Sweeting. 

Good Shtphard Lutheran Church (MItwurl Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (RIs. 69 & 132), Lake Villa. (708) 
3S6-S158, Sunday Worship 8:16 & 10:45 a.m.; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Rov, John 
Zollmor, Pastor, Christian Preschool. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presen fed As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



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tfCS^Jand Nowcpapers 



Friday, July 2, 1993 




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^;July2,lW3 



save a life 

The use of CPR techniques is being 
credited with helping to save the life of an 
Antioch resident 

Mark Simmon, age 34, was struck by a 
car June 27 at 1:02 p.m. off Route 41 in 
Gumec. 

GumeeFire Chief Tim McGrath praised 
the use of CPR,. done by unnamed 
witnesses. . . • 

"He (Simmon) is out of intensive care. 
If he needed CPR, it wais extremely 
significant,'* McGrath said. 

Simmon was transported to St, Therese 
Medical Center. 

Simmon's older-model car had broken 
down. ' :;-_^ {" 

In another accident, on Sunday, Richard 
McAndrew of Union Grove, Wis., was 
transported to SL Therese Hospital off 
Hansen Road and Route 41. . 

■ McGrath said due to the fact McAndrew's 

■ vehicle was in a ditch area, the victim 
could not be seen when the vehicle turned 
over. A hearst tool, tow truck and air 
bags were used to remove McAndrew. 



DEEP LAKEBOAO 

CULVERT REPCACEMENT 

ROAD CLOSURE AND DETOUR 



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Deep Lake Rd. 
to be closed 

' Deep Lake Rd., Lake County Rte. V- 
67 will be closed to through traffic by the 
Lake County Division of Transportation, 
between Illinois Rte. 173 and North Ave., 
Lake County Rte, A-2, starting Tuesday, 
July 6. This closure will be for 10 days 
and is necessary to install new culverts on 
Deep L.ake Rd. 

The detour route as shown on the en- 
closed map will be North Ave,, County 
Rte. A-2, to Illmois Rte. 83, Main SL to 
Illinois Rte. 173. 



Pageant—^ — 

(Continued from page 1) 

.now, she loves wearing her crown. 

"The next step is Little Miss Lake 
County," her mother Kathy explains. 
Her strongest interest is in dancing and 
she is planning a trip to Las Vegas for 
both the solo and team dance 
competition. When asked if she was 
happy about the Little Miss Antioch 
title, she replied "Yep." 

Selected as Milovanovic's Best Friend 
was Heather Ax ton. 



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Miss Antioch contestants 

This year's theme for the Miss Antioch pageant was "Good Jenny Kocal, Erin McCallum, NikI DeFer, Kelly Sullivan, 

Old Fashioned Celebration." Miss Antioch contestants In Megann Haley, Barbara Cavanaugh, Ellen Exner, and Kelly 

evening wear pose to the music of The Discords. Johns. Miss Antioch 1992 Christy Clark, far left, gels ready 

Contestants included: Aimee Kitto, Donna Jedele, Gina to give up her crown.— Photo by Mary Phillips 
Hoerle, KorinneMlszewski, Christina Clllo, Marci Nehlden, 





Little Miss contestants 

Little Miss Antioch contestants model their party dresses. Axton, Sarah Miller, Stephanie Hadad, Jessica Smouse, 

Contestants included: Amanda Levlne, Krisly Backs, Julie Rohde, Felicia Mielke and Tiffany Young.— Photo by 

Tristan Gandolfi, Jennifer Baker, Kaja MiloVanovic, Heather Mary Philips 




ge ex 




sboat motor limits 



by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The Sunset Ridge Subdivision 
represented by Frank Johnson, approached 
tlie Antioch Village Board meeting a 
prohibition on motorboats on Lake 
Antioch. 

The lake is man-made and borders 
Routes 173» 83, 59 and Lake Vista 
Terrace in Antioch. Annexation of some 
lakefroni property by the village has 
raised some concerns for the subdivision 
residents. 

At this time, no gasoline powered 
boats are allowed on the lake due to the 
lake's shallowness. Each subdivision has 



restrictive covenants prohibiting 
motorboat use. Since some of the 
property is now in the village proper the 
-subdivision was seeking an ordinance to 
prohibit gas powered boats from the 
water. 

However, it may be impossible for.the 
village to pass such an ordinance. 
According to Kenneth Clark, village 
attorney, the property rights of some 
individuals may extend to the land 
underneath- the water. This, in effect, 
makes them owners of the lake. 

One of the major problems then is that 
"implicit in an ordinance is the 
responsibility to enforce it," the board 



told Johnson. The village could hot 
enforce an ordinance on property that is 
not in the village and belongs to Lake 
County or.private individuals. 

At this time, Johnson says the 
subdivisions have a "gentlemen's 
agreement" with Lake County to prohibit 
moiorboats. Board members suggested 
that the subdivisions meet with county 
officials. 

In the meantime, the board has 
promised to draft a resolution. While 
there is no criforcement feature in a 
resolution, it does provide public notice 
of the matter. 



Senior complex 



(Continued from, page 1) 

on his views of the proposed senior site. 

Ross hired Libertyville attorney 
Michael Sieman to handle ihe proceedings 
for the petitioners and expected to have 
severalexperts testify in her behalf on the 
positives of the senior complex. . 

^ Experts included Gerald Esies, former 
director of planning for the Lake County 
Regional Planning Commission, Eve 
Lee, former president of the Lake County 
Board of Realtors and a member of the 
Lake County Affordable Housing 
Commission, and Dennis Sonnenburg of 
the American Association for Homes of 
the Aged. 

During the first session, Estes 
provided a detailed view of the proposed 




This, summer when you take your vacation, whether to the Alps or the 
Dells, be certain 1o bring your carnera. Lakeland Newspapers wants 
your community to share In your summer fun. We're interested !n photos 
of area residents In action. We're particularly Interested In the quirky, the 
funny, the cute. Photos should tell a story. Lakeland Newspapers may 
not bQ able to use all photos sent In. If you want your photo returned, 
please send an SASE. We'll handle your photos with care, but will not be 
responsible for lost photos. Send photos to: Photo Editor Gene Gobry, 30 
S. Whitney, Grayslake. IL 60030. 



site and why the site sought the zoning 
variances for septic sewer use and tree 
reforestation. 

One of the first . attempts of 
clariTication came when Estes explained to 
the board that his interpretation of the 
zoning ordinance showed that the project 
fell under the residential use clause of the 
county's suburban zoning ordinance. 

"This is a residential project," said 
Estes to the board. "A group dwelling 
falls under a residential classification. 
This would allow the use of a septic 
system until sewers are brought to the 
area sometime in the future." 

However, Board member Gloria Helke 
disagreed with Estes' view of the project. 

"This is a commercial development," 
said Helke. "If you are charging rent^ that 
is a commercial developmenL" 

The other main issue dealt with the 
reforestation ordinance in the suburban 
zoning ordinance, which requires the 
developer to replace the mature trees it 
cuts down somewhere on the property 
being developed. 

The Antioch Country Inn development 
doesn't have enough available space to 
follow the ordinance and is asking for a 
reforestation variance to help comply. The 
variance the petitioners seek would be the 
first of. its kind, where the developer 



would replace the trees destroyed on the 
developed site on another off-site location, 
possibly a forest preserve or other suitable 
land. 

Lake County Senior Planner Mark 
Askelson said of the Country Inn's 
reforestation plan, "There has to be a trade 
off here. Thai's why in our staff report to 
the board, we recommended that the off- 
site area not be located on forest preserve 
land. The forest preserve land is already 
open. There would be no trade-off." 

The need to build a septic farm on the 
site to handle the 70-plus senior rooms in 
the three-story building proposed by 
Ross's group is the reason the 
reforestation issue looms large. With out 
sewer service, the project can't continue if 
the septic farm cannot be builL 

"this reforestation issue is cutting 
new ground on the board," said Helke. 

Sieman replied, "This is an unique 
project" 

Neighbors of the proposed site 
believe, as Ross does, Uiat the senior 
development is a much needed project^ 

However, most believe the project is the 
right idea in the wrong location. 

The community awaits the next 
continuance hearing on July 19 at 1:30 
p.m. in the Antioch Township Hall. 



I ■ 1- 



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Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Newspaper* 9 



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ioin in effort to curb gan^ 

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by ALEC JUNGE 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Over 30 different officials from, 
schools, government, police and business 
people came together in Lindenhurst to 
fight a common enemy. Gangs. 

Representatives from Antioch, 
Gray slake, Lake Villa, and Lindenhurst 
were at the meeting. 

The four mayors, Marilyn Shineflug 
of Antioch, Pat Carey of Grayslake, 
Frank Loffredo of Lake Villa and Paul 



Parade 



Baumunk of Lindenhurst agreed to 
cooperate together. 

"They met on their own and decided to 
participate and set a direction," said Kevin 
Klahs acting police chief of Lindenhurst. 

"It was a wonderful, night," Linda 
Bergin of the. Lindenhurst Community 
Partnership said. "It was great to see rep- 
resentatives from all four communities 
working together." 

Part of. the program was a talk by 
Detective Gary Govakar, of the Lake 



(Continued from page 1) 

Fourth of July choir. The. dedication 
precedes the Children's Festival, so kids 
can gain awareness of the true meaning of 
this patriotic holiday. 

"The kids fair will be spectacular," said 
LeMerc. It will feature a pelting zoo, 
pony rides, Snooky the Clown, face 
painting and lots of games. The 
Children's Festival continues through 3 
p.m. 

Fourth of July events begin In 
Williams Park at 9 a.m. with a Crazy Co- 
Ed Softball tournament, Basketball 3- 
Point jShoot Out contest and Go-Ed 
Volleyball tournament. At 11 a.m. there 
will be horse shoe and casting tourneys. 
Antioch Fire Department sponsors water 
fights at 2 p.m. Food and beer booths 
will be sponsored by the Lions Club. The 
Rotary will hold bingo games throughout 
the day. 

A main event new this year will be tlie 
Tug of War between the Antioch Lions 
Club and the Antioch Rescue Squad at 4 
p.m. The two groups will hold their test 
of slrengtli over a mud hole, two-feet 
deep. After it's over, two ladies in bikinis, 
provided by John Haley of Blarney's 
Island, will hose off the losers. 
Musical entertainment begins at 5 p.m. 




County Sheriffs Department. He stresses 
gang symbols and some of the problems 
this area is having relating to gangs 

"We have a problem in this area of 
with gang members from other conununi- 
ties coming in and recruiting our kids. We 
need to be aware and stay on top of things 
and gel to the kids we can get to," Bergin 
said. , 

The task force now has a motto., It is 
Community Outreach United Residents 
Against Gangs (COURAGE). 

The gang task force decided to. create 
three separate committees. The conmiit- 
tees are prevention, education and inter- 
vention. 



The prevention group will focus on 
recreational activities as an alternative to 
gangs. • . 

The educational group will have 
speakers, workshops, and train educators. 

Intervention is made up of the gov- 
ernment and police enforcement officials. 
They will take a more proactive stand and 
have the community and' police work 
more closely together. 

The task force is a cooperative effort 
started by Lindenhurst with, other com- 
munities invited to join the effort. The 
task force has existed since February. The 
goal of the task force is to take a proac- 
tive stance toward gang activity. 



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Gangs 



Snooky the Clown 



and features the Footlight's Grease Band, 
Antioch Fourth of July Choir, Antioch 
Community High School Choir, and the 
Lakes Area Community Band, 



(Continued from page 1) 

individuals are from out of town. Our 
biggest asset is that we are way out here." 
Roth feels that it is helpful that the area 
is far away from Waukegan and Chicago, 
areas known for gang activity. 

Local teenagers tell a different story. 
The teens speak of the different ways to 
join the CD's, which is "to be beat in or 
blessed in." To be beaten in, the 
proposed member is beaten up in all areas 
of the body except the face. To be blessed 
in appears to be a considerable less 
painful form of recruitment in '^hich a 
youngster is simply admitted. : ' 

Roth, conversely believes that many of 
the teen's accounts arc based more on 
movies, television, and rap music than 
actual events. He believes that young 



The holiday activities come to a 
patriotic climax with an appearance by 

Abe Lincoln and the Statue of Liberty, people arc seduced into this kind of 
played by P.M.&L. actors John Rooker 
and Peggie Reynolds. Abe Lincoln will 
read the Gettysburg address and then die 
fireworks will sparkle and bang 
accompanied by patriotic melodies sung 
by the Fourth of July Chou-. 



behavior because it appears to be 
glamorous and exciting. 

Actual gang activity in the Antioch 
area, to date, has been limited to inking 
the fork symbol on school desks, folders, 
and clothing. Local officials are taking a 



proactive stance on even this minor 
activity. Students caught having or using 
gang symbols in the high school find 
themselves meeting witli police, school 
officials, parents and counselors in an 
effort to nip their involvement in the bud. 

In the meantime, there seems to be no 
conclusive evidence about gang activity in 
the Antioch area. When offered, alleged 
gang members refused to make any 
comment 

"If we wanted to talk to newspapers, we 
would have a long time ago," one 
member was quoted. 

While both young people and the police 
agree that there is little or no gang 
activity in the area, there appears to be 
some individuals who are claiming gang 
membership. Whether these individuals 
are gangster "wanna-bes" or real gang 
members is unclear. But, the problem 
may be just how far tiicse individuals are 
willing to go. It seems immaterial 
whether or not there are actual ties to 
gangs if these individuals arc planning 
criminal activity. 



Two hurt in Chain accidents 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

As the July 4th holiday 
weekend approaches, 
boaters are again warned of 
the dangers of boating on 
Uic Chain O' Lakes when 
thousands of boats hit the 
water. 

This past weekend, two 
separate boating accidents 
on Chjiin waterways sent 
two women to area 
hospitals for trcatmenu 

The first accident 
occurred on June 28 when a 
boater ran over a woman 
with a life preserver on, 
who was floating in the 
water just outside the no- 
wake zone. 

Lisa Oriando, 24, was 
taken by helicopter to 
Milwaukee County Medical 
Complex after she was 
struck by a 19-foot cabin 
cruiser driven by John Fox, 
35, of Hoffman Estates, 
and received a severe cut to 
her abdomen area from the 
boat's propeller. Orlando 
was floating in the water 
after the water scooter she 
was riding on developed 
mechanical problems. 

Fox brdught her onto 



his boat and brought her to 
shore, where she was 
airlifted to Milwaukee. 
Fox, who had four 
passengers on his boat, was 
not drinking according to 
Marine Unit Sgt. James 
Bryant. Fox was ticketed" 
with careless operation of a 
watcrcraft 

Orlando was in stable 
condition at the Milwaukee 
hospital as of Lakeland 
Newspapers' press deadline. 

The second accident of 



the weekend occurred on 
June 29 at 9 p.m. when 
two boats, according to 
Bryant, were heading for a 
head-on collision when the 
two drivers couldn't turn to 
get out of the way of each 
other. 

Only Lori Jones, 38, of 
Hanover Park, was injured 
in the collision. 

Bryant said no tickets 
were issued in the second 
crash. 



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Lakeland Newspapers' EDITORIAL 



Waste plan promising 



Proposed recycling plant 
would be acceptible to 
all sides of solid waste 
debate. 

The proposal to build a multl-million- 
doUar recycling plaot is promising for no 
other reason than it provides a middle 
ground in the long-standing debate over 
which way to go in dealing with solid 
waste disposal. 

The plan has been advanced by the Solid 
Waste Agency of Lake County and now is 
before the County Board. If the proposal 
is a comproioaise and possibly a means to 
diffuse controversy over incineration, then 
the middle ground is expensive turf. The 
facility, referred to as an intermediate 
processing facility, could cost up to $15.4 
million. The operation is designed to 
handle 250 tons of material a day, 
basically only a fair start on what the 
county generates in solid waste daily. 

The promise in the proposed, recycling 



plant, as vve see it, is that it provides 
some brcaUiing room for solving long- 
range solid waste disposal needs. While 
the price isn't exactly pocket change, the 
cost can be handled by a county with over 
half a million population and a robust 
economy. The project would also aiford 
an excellent opportunity to study the 
benefits of big-time recycling advocated 
by , environmentalists as opposed to 
continued land filling and highly 
controversial incineration. The recycling 
center would also provide county 
government to "test the water" by getting 
into the solid waste disposal business. • 

Without doubt, there will wrangling 
over siting, cost effectiveness and whether 
the facility is large enough to be effective. 
That's to be expected in the political 
process. The plan, from our viewpoint, 
is logical, affordable and above all, 
doable. The plan can be supported by all 
sides of the debate in the difficult task of 
getting rid of modem society's trash. 




Consider athletes 
have fun with sports 






by CRAIG FENTERS 

I ve been involved in the Lindenhurst 
Soccer League for eight years, rve gone 
from rookie coach to: former board mem- 
ber, FIFA certified referee, MSA certified 
referee, traveling coach and various odd 
jobs along the way for the soccer league. 

It has been fun most of the time and 
it's been a real pleasure working with the 
youth. Kids playing soccer and other 
sports is increasing all the time. Look at 



the number of fields and park district pro- 
grams that are running throughout the 
summer. If you're a kid the programs you 
can participate in* are endless and enjoy- 




Police experiment 



Mundelein satellite 
station new twist to 
popular theory of 
community policing. 

Mundelein's experiment with a police 
satellite station in one way is a modem 
version of the time-honored "cop on the 
beat" theory of keeping the peace. 

When law enforcement dropped foot 
patrols in favor of squad patrolling and 
radio communications, both the 
omnipresence of an officer in uniform and 
the human side of policing became 
secondary. Now Police Chief Raymond 
Rose is attempting to bring back the 
upfront benefits of a police officer on duty 
by locating a station in an apartment 
complex known for violence and gang 
activity. 

Chief Rose calls the satellite station a 



version of the theory of community 
policing which is gaining acceptance in 
law enforcement. Mundelein officers 
assigned to satellite duty in the trouble 
spot will be encouraged to interact with 
residents in positive ways besides being 
readily available to respond to calls for 
assistance. 

Not all police agencies are ready to jump 
on the satellite police station bandwagon. 
Many law enforcement officials frankly 
are dubious about the Mundelein 
experiment. In maiiy communities 
hereabouts a satellite station isn't needed 
or probably wouldn't work. 

At this particular time, though, phief 
Rose sees the satellite station in 
Mundelein as a cost effective way to 
improve law and order. The new idea 
should be given a chance. The satellite 
station concept certainly is worth 
watching. 




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TMrt<H|i«M 



Agency need for funds legitimate 

New state funding for 



waterways managers 
will be money well spent. 

Since its organization more than a 
decade ago, the Chain O' Lakes/Fox River 
Waterway Management Agency has been 
severely buffeted around by federal and 
state bureaucracies, scandal and scorned by 
citizens impatient for improvement of 
water quality and safety on one of the 
nation's busiest waterways. 

All that was part of "growing pains." 
Now the agency seems poised under new 
leadership and a revitalized attitude on the 
part of the elected commissioners who 
serve without pay to do the job for which 
it was organized by an act of the Illinois 
General Assembly. 

With new found support from the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers and the Illinois 
Dept of Transportation-Division of Water 
Resources, the agency is on firm ground 
asking for state funding help to expand its 
financial base, provided mostly by 
stickers sold to boaters on the Chain and 
Fox River. 

, As agency chairman Dr. William C. ^ 
Dam put it, the agency is able to provide 
maintenance, ''but we. can't make up for 
40 years of neglect." It's the catch-up part 
where the agency needs help. We support 
efforts to provide more financial help for 
the agency for boating safety, dredging 
and improved water quality from the 
stateline to Algonquin. 

The agency has received more dredging 
permits in the last six months than the 
last six years. That rate of activity, ought 
to dispel public criticisni that the non-tax 
supported body is a "do nothing" agency. 



But there is much work to be done. 
Twelve million cubic yards of sediment 
must be dredged to bring the average depth 
of 80 percent of the waterway to four feet. 
The Army Corps has recommended double 
that amount would be necessary to meet a 
recommended depth of six feet 

There is another important side to 
agency work — helping control flooding. 
While dredging silt makes for better 



boating and improved water quality, 
deepening the channels also increases 
holding capacity. 

An estimated nine million people live 
within a two hour drive of one of Illinois' 
key- natural resources, more than half the 
state's population. With so much at stake 
and the agency demonstrating an ability to* 
"deliver the goods," additional state 
financial help will be money well spent. 



able. Are they? 

Over the years Tve seen an increase in 
. the number of violent acts, disrespect to- 
wards officials, players, parents. It's not 
uncommon to see kids getting kicked out 
of games, coaches verbally abusing offi- 
cials and players, and parents going 
bonkers. 

What happened to the idea that youth 
sports is suppose to fiin win or loose? 

I guess by today's standards I should be 
considered a failure as a coach. I've only 
had one winning season in eight years. 
I've adopted the idea the kids are supposed 
to be involved in running the team, play- 
ing various position and generally having 
a good time. 

When this criteria wasn't met, Icon- 
sidered this a failing season, not the win- , 
loss rccOTd. I've known kids on undefeated 
teams get the first place trophy and never 
play soccer again. Why? Because the 
coaches will "sit" them half the game, 
only play them, where they think they will 
do the least damage, never give Ihem op- 
portunity to enjoy the game. 

The biggest complaint is that the offi- 
cials are blind and don't know what they're 
doing. It's difficult to get trained and sea- 
soned officials when they know that they 
will get verbally abused by the parents, 
coaches, and players. Right or wrong the 
referee has to make a split second deci- 
sions on what to do. It's his call and be 
makes it. This is the important part. He is 
out there making it. Ninety-nine percent 
of the parents in this league aren't. Leave 
the referee alone and with time andexperi- 
ence we will all become better officials. 

I think it's time for all to step back. 
Let the kids play the game. Everyone 
wants to win but what are we willing to 
sacrifice just to say we took first place? 
Over the years I've taken coaching classes 
that make a simple statement that is all 
encompassing. "Athletes first, winning 
second." Think about this statement the 
next time you argue with a coach, yell at a 
referee or criticize a child 

Is winning that important to your 
child or is it that important to you? 

Editor's note: Craig Fenters 
has done it all with youth see* 
cer— father, coach, referee, specta- 
tor. He and his family reside in 
Llndenhurst. . 




Viewpoint 



Clinton sparks GOP renewal 



by BILL SCHROEDER 

Credit President Bill Clinton With 
igniting renewed interest in Lake County 
in Republican politics. 

Pause. Let that sink in. The Man in 
the White House bemg a GOP sparkplug? 

"No doubt about it," exclaims Valery E. 
Gallagher, executive director of the Lake 
County Republican Federation, the fund 
raising arm of the Lake County GOP. 
Gallagher repotted that the recent fiind 
raising dinner at Marriott Lincolnshire 
was the biggest ever, membership 
retehtioii is ahead of schedule and the new 
Federation Junior Board of Republicans 
age 21-40 is growing by leaps and 
bounds. 

"Everything is very positive," enthused 
Gallagher, the Libertyville native who 
runs Federation headquarters at 332 



Peterson Rd., Libertyville, 

The reason everything is upbeat lies in 
the fact that Lake County residents 
basically are fiscally conservative, 
Gallagher explained. "They don't like 
what they see going on in Washington, 
so they want to do something about it 
They become involved." 

Gallagher added, "After 12 years of 
having a Republican in the White House, 
I guess we might have become a little 
lax." Lake County residents are . 
perceptive and astute, Gallagher noted. 
They see the President's deficit reduction 
program for what it is: Retroactive taxes 
with the cuts coming four years down the 
road. 

So next time you see President Clinton 
being toasted at a local GOP gathering, 
don't be fooled that Republicans are 



paying homage to die commander in 
chief. They're just energizing themselves. 
••••••• 
ONE MAN'S FAMItY--Pop's 

green thumb is getting the acid test what 
with two dogs who think flower beds and 
other plantings are places to romp. 
Inquisitive Callie and Thed unnervingly 
squash freshly installed bedding plants 
while finding out What the man around 
the house is doing on his hands and knees 
poking at the ground. Bare spots along 
the borders and a scalped section of the 
lawn likely will remain because they've - 
become canine trails in the yard. 







by 



VIR(g 

Afterk 
again pausf 
feiencesui 
teorologici 
inEastfer 

Althou 
a continus 
the pace s 
takes tini 
true inters 
accomplis 
people id 
ness estal 

ReUg 
and all i 
open fes' 
parties tc 
the even 
ticipatinj 
values a] 

McC 
from wl 
natt, wf 
private: 
boardin 
and ev< 

Duty"v 
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Friday, July 2, 1993 



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Lakeland Newspapers' OPINION 



ith 

% 

Qly 

ITS. 

sed 
ly- 
ing 

©n- 
vin- . 
atcd 

ever 

the 

une, 

wm 

lop- 

offi- 

ley're 

Isea- 

: they 

rents, 

ig the 

deci- 

nd he 

He is 

ercent 

Leave 

ixperi- 

^s. 

y back. 

eryone 

ling to 

place? 

classes 

It is all 

/inning 

lent the 

yell at a 

to your 
t? 

Centers 
th soc' 
specta- 
side in 



derin 
themselves. 

-Pop's 
t test what 
:r beds and 
)mp. 

aervingly 
g plants 
Q around 
Island knees 
>bts along 
on of the 
se they've * 
rd 



Pray er s stiH r eiiitii^ during so 




rites 



by VIRGINIA PARK 

After a recent sojourn in the South, I 
again pause to evaluate the noticeable dif- 
ferences in the very atmosphere (not me- 
teorologically speaking), that is prevalent 
in East Tennessee. 

Although our stay there this time was 
a continual flurry of social engagements, 
the pace seems a little slower. Everyone 
takes time to. really converse, to show 
true interest in another's career, hobby or 
accomplishment There is a friendliness of 
people in public places, stores and busi- 
ness establishments. 

Religion seems much more important 
and all pervasive in the South. Prayers 
open festivities of every sort from social 
parties to family get-togethers, and always 
the evening meal, The young people par- 
ticipating are repeatedly reminded of mornl 
values and causes for rejoicing. 

McCallie School in Chattanooga, 
from which our grandson; Abraham My- 
natt, was graduating, is one of the large 
private academies in the South, having 
boarding students from many other states, 
and even far away countries. Founded in 
1905, the'school's motto, "Honor, Truth, 
Duty", emphasizes the ethical standards 
that affect the campus. 

The Baccalaureate Service in the 
Chapel was an inspirational experience to 
us and, I'm sure, to everyone there. Bible 
readmgs from the Old and New Testament 
(Daniel 1:1-20, and Matthew 5:13-16) 
highlighted the importance of personal re- 
sponsibility. Tales of the three Hebrew 
boys of fiery furnace and lion's den fame 
portrayed worthy role models. 

Hymns by the congregation, music by 
the Advanced Handbells and the Select 
Ensemble ornamented the program with 
its important messages. 

The whole affair was very moving to 
me because my grandfather (Abraham's 



great, great grandfather) fought as a Union 
soldier in the Civil' War battle of Mis- 
sionary Ridge on the very spot where 
McCallie School now stands. Following 
the ceremony a banquet was held for every 
one in the adjoining gymnasium with 
Graduation exercises the following day. 
They really do things up right down yon- 
der. 

At this season of conmiencements ey- 
erywhere, I was interested to note front 
page banner headlines and pictures in the 
KnomileNews Sentinel on May 29 that 



We are bombarded daily with various 
news items from everywhere on the 
"telly", but a little travel now and then 
broadens one's appreciation of the true di- 
versity and individuality of other locales, 
customs and beliefs in this magnificent 



panorama we call our very own United 
Statesl 

Editor's note: Virginia Park, 
author and writer, is a keen ob- 
server of America's passing 
scene. She resides in Long Grove. 



Letters to the Ed!tt)r 




told an amazing story. T^dt accepting the 
Supreme Court's decision that prayers at 
public schools were unconstitutioiia], stu- 
dents m Knox County wore crosses with 
their caps and.gowns and recited in unison 
the Lord's Prayer aft^. the ceremonies 
were over. "Cheers, appl'^^e and shouts 
of 'Amen' erupted froni the 300 parents, 
friends and relatives gathered in the Civic 
Auditorium, " the accompanying article 
noted. 

Another new item I saw told of 
prayers at graduation ceremonies in Iowa 
and Arkansas also. • 

Of considerable interest, too, was the 
active and widespread sentiment for con- 
servatism now in the Soutb/I bad always 
envisioned a generally Democratic south- 
land widiout hearing much about politics 
on previous visits. This year, however, 
the topic was continually on the table for 
discussion at every gaUiering. I had ail 
sorts of publications thrust upon me and 
developed a new appreciation of "grass 
roots" activities. 




CRAFT & ART FAIR 

Village Square Shopping Ctr. 

SWComerRfs. 12&22 

Lake Zurich 

Sat., July 10, TO-5 
Sun.. July 11, 11-4 

75 Crofters From 
A4StoteArea 

For more informatioa 

call Craft Show 

Promotions, Inc. 

708-231-8644 



Concert appreciated 

Editor. 

My son and I enjoyed a very relaxing, 
entertaining, no-cost events Concert in 
the Park at WiJ'lams Park sponsored by 
the First Chicago Bank in Antiocb. 

This Ravinia-style concert by a coun- 
try-western band was Iruly an event that 
allowed me to relax, eiijoy the summer 
evening, and promote family values. I 
applaud First Chicago for their efforts. 
While attendance was very light, my hope 
is more individuals will t^e advantage of 
the remaining concerts First Chicago will 
sponsor this summer. 

Thank you, First Chicago, for initiat- 
ing an event that yoiing people, families, 
couples, and singles, can enjoy together. I 
have attended other towns' functions of 
this type and wished Antioch could do 
sometl^ng similar. Your effort has gone a 
long way in making our town a fun place 
and in promoting good wiU. 

Kathy Allen 
Antioch 

Amendment endangered 

Editor: 

On June 24, 1976 freJshman Con- 
gressman Henry Hyde of Illinois rose 
from the floor of the House of Represen- 
tatives in Washington, D.C. and offered 
the Hyde Amendment to end government 
funded abortion on request Affirmed and 
upheld by the courts, in 1978, the Hyde 
Amendment marked the first significant 
step toward the reversal of Roe vs. Wade. 

This Hyde Amendment currently lim- 
its federal Medicaid funds for abortion to 





Lakeland Newspapers 
Sold In One Day I 

My washer and dryer SOLD the 
^ ^ same day the paper came out.The ^ ^ 
caller saw our ad in the Round Lake 
News. Thanks Lakeland for the quick 
response! 
Roy Fickel 
Libertyville, IL 

708-223-8161 Lakeland Newspapers Classified 





Friday, July 2. 1993 



cases where the.mother's life is endan- 
gered. This amendment has been attached 
each year to the Labor/Health and Hiiman 
Service Appropriation Bill., 

In fiscal year 1991 only 89 abortions 
were funded, but if the Hyde Amendment 
is not renewed^ the government would be 
requhed to fiind at least 300,000 abortions 
.each year at the cost of at least $75 mil- 
lion. The majority of Americans oppose 
the use of their tax dollars to pay for abor- 
tions. It would be an outrageous violation 
of their consciences to force them to sub- 
sidize the killing of unborn children. 

Bonnie Quiike, R.N. 
President, Lake County Right to Life 

Thought on spending 

Editor 

What would happen if we the people, 
who are supposed to be the government, 
could order our senators and 
representatives, who are supposed to be 
working for us, that they shall not spend 
in any year more than was collected from 
us in taxes the previous year? 

HX. "Hap" Kordt 
' Grayslake 



Letters Inyited 

Letters to the editor are welcome. 
They should be on topics of general 
interest, approximately 250 words or 
less. All letters must be signed, and 
contain home address and telephone 
number. The editor reserves the right 
to condense all letters. 




State Bank of Antioch 



Hippy BMidiy America 



ALL FACILITIES WILL BE CLOSED 

ANTIOCH AND LINDENHURST 

MONDAY, JULY 5, 1993 
IN CELEBRATION OF 
INDEPENDENCE DAY 




WE ARE A auM rmnon* bank 




QUUMUIIN 

LENDER 



SUMM 



SPe^i/m^n^ the. SBa^^e^ &teaM^n. 



HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY HOLIDAY 




Lakeland Newspapers 13 



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Lakeland Newspapers' OPINION 



1 





Stevenson forum July 21 to showcase Dem talent 



Party LineSf the Lakeland 
Newspaper political column, is 
prepared from staff reports. 
Lake County Democrats and their leader, 
County Chairman Terry Link, feel 
they've struck pay dirt in a big way with 
the July 21 forum at Stevenson High 
School featuring four prospective 
candidates for governor. 

"It's a first and we're doing it," 
exclaimed Link. The format will feature 
talks by Comptroller Dawn Clark 
Netsch, Atty. Gen. Roland 
Burris, Cook County Board 
Chairman Dick Phelan and State 
Treasurer Pat Quinn. 
Local Democrats are so far ahead of the 
curve that none of the possible 
gubematocial candidates has made a 
statement of candidacy. "And," Terry 
chuckled, "we're still working on 
confirmations for the 21st. But they'll be 
there," added the confident party chief. 
Talks begin at 7:30 p.m. followed by 
questions from the audience. Link 
emphasized that the program is not a 
debate. 
You don't have to be a card-carrying 
Democrat to attend the forum, which is 
open to all interested perons. 
• Lake County Democrats also are talking 
up their Sept. 3 golf outing at Foss Park, 
North Chicago. "We won't be chargmg as 
much as the Republicans," Link stated, 
adding that the cost of greens fees, dinner 
and 9 little bit left over for party coffers 
hasn't yet been decided. The GOP golf 
affair Aug. 20 at Midlane Country Club 
has a floating rate: $150 celebrity, $75 
regular; dinner only $40. 



County, says she is pleased with 
Republican leadership in Springfield. "I'm 
surprised that we're not told more how to 
vote," remarked Clayton, a first termer in 
the General Assembly, She is the former 
mayor of Buffalo Grove. 



Track meet— The Lake County 
Republican calendar for July resembles a 
track meet with seven (count'em) major 
events on the docket. Congressman Phil 



Party Lines 



Crane speaks July 6 at Mers Restaurant, 
Wauconda. Sunday, July 1 1, the Veraon 
township Republican organization's 
annual family picnic is scheduled for 
Prairie View Park. Tuesday, July 13, 
State Rep. Andrea Moore(R-LibertyviIle) 
hosts track magnet Richard Duchossois for 
breakfast at Condell Medical Center and 
Sheriff Clint Grinnell will be meeting 
supporters that evening at Mers. Sunday, 
July 18, is the 26th annual take County 
Republican Day at Holiday Park, Wooster 
Lake. Wednesday, July 28, its golf at 
Antioch Country Club for Lake Villa 
Township Republicans and the Lake 
County Fair starts at Grayslake. Phew! 
These events are open to all. The object 
is to have fiin and raise money. So bring 
your wallet 



Likes GOP team— State Rep. Vema 
Clayton (R-Buffalo Grove), speakmg 
before an audience at College of Lake 



Another job — By now, Richard 
"Dick" Welton, of Gumee probably 
has lost count of all the jobs he holds 
down in the public sector. The mayor's 
latest post is a directorship on the board of 
the Transportation Management Assn. 
(TMA) of Central Lake County. 




WXLC FM 



1991 HOT SP9f S 

TOUR 



Stop byjind see us at: 

ANTIOCH 

INDEPENDENCE 

CELEBRATION 

Sunday, July 4; 12-3 p.m. 



REGISTER TO WIN A 
T 993 GEO TRACKER! 



Tipckifikci 



JffnSrqW 




Three-peat— Take it from Jan 
Bairstow, there still are new worlds to 
conquor. Eyen after two defeats, the 
Libertyville Democrat has faith in the 
American political system.- "Maybe 
somebody out there likes me," Jan 
exclaimed. 



approached the board about a second 
display one day before Ihc annual one 
semi-sponsored by the village. Maybe 
both will get village support next spring. 



Fireworks fiasco— Fox Lake resident 
and owner of the Mincola Marine Pete 
Jakstas Sr. is upset over the village's 
handling of the annual fireworks 
celebration. It seems Jaksias was beside 
himself at a Fox Lake Village Board 
meeting last month when the board 
approved the permit to allow restaurant 
owner Dino Maravelas to host his own 
fireworks show on July 2, one day before 
Jakstas will host the event The village 
gave Jakstas $2,000 to sponsor as the 
Fox Lake Fireworks Celebration at the 
. March 1 village board meeting. In 
addition, at that same village board 
meeting in March, the board, then under 
fonner Mayor Frank Meier, passed a 
motion which named Jakstas die 
coordinator of the 1993 event Ironically , 
it was Mayor Ken Hamsher, who was 
a village trustee then, who moved to 
appoint Jakstas to the annual position, ■ 
just as the board had done the 10 years 
previous. When confronted about the 
fireworks misunderstanding, Hamsher said 
historically, Fox Lake struggled to have a 
fmjworks display. Now, the village has 
two displays and the more the merrier. 
"At the time we appointed Pete, there was 
only one fireworks display," said 
Hamsher. "It was proper and nice to do so 
then. But now we have two and I think 
that is great" Hamsher's middle ground 
response probably isn't what Jakstas 
wanted to hear as he sought for support 
from the board when Maravelas 



Fueling flames — It seems like 
the contiDverey in Kildccr concerning 
Village Administrator Laurel 
Schreiber will never die, as the Kildeer 
Coalition put together a rebuttal to the 
rebuttal Schreiber presented to the village 
and media at the board's special meeting 
June 23. Janet Nixon, a coalition 
member, said the coalition met the 
following evening and put together the 
draft which goes through Schreiber's 
report poinl-by-point and concludes by 
asking Schreiber to show some 
professionalism and step down. The 
Kildeer Coalition backed newly elected 
president Barbara Schwietert in the 
April election. 

Highway mess- - -Lake Villa 
Highway Conmiissioner Jim 
Semmerling is taking a considerable 
amount of criticism from residents. At the 
town meeting on Tuesday night residents 
made a motion requesting Semmerling 
come to the board if he wants more 
money in his budget and to address the 
board at a public meeting before any liti- 
gation. 

Some of the residents wanted to draft mo- 
tions taking away his funds. 

Semmerling has also been accused of 
treating residents he doesn't like unfairly. 
Could it be a coincidence that the Fox 
Lake Hills subdivsion work was cut by 
Semmerling after some of their residents 
complained about him in a budget hear- 
ing? 

Why was the highway department out 
pumping an employees ditch instead of 
coming to a fiiU scale flood on Columbia 
Bay Dr.? 



NEWS 1 22 




THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 

1 99 1 LAKE CO VNtY 



Stop by and see us at: 

MUNDELEIN 
COMMUNITIP 

DAYS 

Saturday, July 3; 1-4 p.m- 



Dairyland Greyhound Park- 

I MNp|lw>.tUI.Sntti4M.MWipf»Ufl I taa III m? 




(Chicago Otibune 



Marri 

June 10 T 
Thomai 
Joy Sally ;S 
Beach; Jan 
LakeViUa 
Mundeleir 
Windier, 
Amanda K 
Jimell 
Albert, 







14 Lakeland Newtpapors 






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Friday, July 2. 1993 



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Marage^cen^ 



Thomas Michael Rogalla and 
Joy SftUy Skotnicki, Round Lake 
Beach; James Edward Schksaer, 
Lake ViUa and Unda Lee Wilson, 
Mundelcin; Michael Jo^P" 
Windier, Gurnee and Jane 
Amanda Kuhlke, Chicago. 

"°*Albert Julius Carter and Mice 



Jean Cook, Ubertyyille; Robert 
Mark Findlay, Ingfewde and ^- 
cinda Jean Ringer. Fox Lake^ Ed- 
ward Charles Glod and Diana 
Mwgarita Luttmer, Libenyville; 
Leonelit Lopez, Great Lakes and 
Minda Farfc. ^aukegan; Todd 
Arthur Morris and Lisa Delane 
hSio, Grayslake; Raymond 
SpUmble; Round Lake Beach 



and Erin EUzabcih Cochran, Lake 
Suf^Frank Edward Vavra and 

Paiiaa Ann Wiles. Vernon HiUs, 
eS Alan Wrid and JuaniU 
Ramirez Fortin, Grayslake. 

•^^^elinis MichaeLIJjnnV Ijn- 
denhurst and Melissa Marguente. 
Krerowici, ^on',^ynmoC\^^ 
dio Gutierrez, CaUfornia ana 



Cresencia Posadas Romero. 
Guroee; Robert Timothy Unzi. 
Syvillc and Kathryn Helen 
Harrigan. Deerfield; Herbert 
,Be^d NiUes, Western Spnn^ 
and Jane Zacher Kennedy, Ver- 
non ffiUs-, Michael Roman ^ 
,-„ Jr libcrtyville and Victona 
E^Rog^sTKdeleiniJonal^ 
Shaync Pickett, Great Ukes and 



GwvJaJdBSbara Ellen Nidsen 

SSdand Park; Pedro V. Tonj». 

ffid Lake Park "f . VXJ 
Gilrcia Morales. Round Lake 

Beach, 
^""limothy Ray CaudiU and 



Kellv Ann Swcdo, W«|coi«hj 
xSy r^banell Gadsqn-Yubrough 

and Virginia Sue Sartow. Great 
Lakes; Kevin Charles 
Glogovsky, Gurncc .and 
Kathcrine Mary Wynne, Antioch. 
Hormoz Mazdiyasni and Hida 
Pouladian, Grayslake. 




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A Month For 24J^d2!ia2f '• 



H^ ic!nr4Dr 5-Or and wagon models. $244.48 firet 



VitlA 




FORD 



see Your Local Ford Dealer Today'. 



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Lakeland Nowipap«» 15 



Friday, July 2.1^^ 






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GET "IT" OFF 

YOURCiHEST 

(708)223-8073 



LIPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 6) 

Almost Second Emergency 

I am a resident in Round Lake Beach, Saturday 
evening, all of a sudden a bunch of sirens went off. The 
cops were traveling over 50 mph in a residential area. A 
little boy just missed being hit by the rear bumper when 
he ran down to see what the commotion was. Please 
police, slow down when you are in these back 
neighborhoods. Someone could get hurt 

Kill For The Thrill 

Who are the poachers? They do not kill for food, they 
are not poor. They kill for the thrill. Poachers are 
criminals. 

Bad Plan 

I am from Round Lake and am concerned about the 
proposed dike. The dike is to help the flooding in North 
Libertyville Estates. The homes should not have been 
built there in the first place. If the dike is put in, all 
you would be doing is increasing the taxes only to have 
the water held within the subdivision. Don't let 
politicians sell you the dike. It will not work. 

Nobody Asked You 

Hey "White All White", nobody asked you to come to 
North Chicago to clean up anything for us. Secondly, I 
do not see what the fact that you are white has to do 
with anything. 

Aching Back 

I am froni Round Lake and work in Hainesville. It is 
fine and courteous for cashiers to place a customer's 
change in their hands. That's fine, but it would help if 
the customer could come closer to the counter. After 
several hours of reaching over the counter your back gets 
sore. 

Pig Pen 

The Round Lake Village folks are sexist pigs! How 
dare you promulgate regulations about women's wear 
^.without similar restrictions on men!! ! I think you are - 
all a bunch oFh'omy little b*$5%%?s. 

Graduation Overkill 

I am from Round Lake and my son is going to fourth 
grade. What is this business of having eighth graders 
wearing cap & gown? What will they have to look 
forward to in high school? Are the schools worried that 
this may be their last graduation? 



Quitting Time 



I just read about the early retirement of some Antioch 
teachers. Just a few years ago, the teachers union used 
its political influence to pass an early retirement 
package. Recently they added a five year buy-out so that 
they can retire at age 50. This is public robbery. 

Not Moving 

Wc moved into a new subdivision and there were no 
dogs at the time. Now everyone has barking dogs. 
There are leash laws and noise laws. But, should we 
make everyone move out but us? Use the law and your 
head. 

Kids In The Street 

I am calling about the lack of facilities for children to 
play in the Hunters Creek Area. The kids have to play 
in the street, yet there are two baseball fields in the park. 
The parks department doesn't seem to care about young 
children. 

Compare Size Not Age 

I think that the young man with disabilities should 
play with the 3rd and 4th graders. Why shouldn't he? 
Maybe he is 12, but he is the size and weight of those^ 
younger children. 

Needed Limits 

To the dumb waterway directors. The water in the 
Chain O'Lakes was at the no-wake level this last 
weekend. But the board of directors decided to allow no 
speed linuts. What were they thinking about. Who 
were they appealing to? What a stupid decision. 

Mad At Us Too 

I am "Mad Wife". My words were so distorted, I am 



16 Lakoland No wspaporc 




Ivakeiand 

Xcwspapcrs 



' now in agreement with the man Who said "Lipservice 
sucks!". Bye. 

Doggy Alarm Clocks 

Something is seriously wrong here. Dog owners let 
their hyped up barking dogs bark at 5:00 in the morning 
before they go to work, at 11:00 at night, and 
throughout the day. Tten dog owners call up Lipservice 
and tell us that before we buy a house we need to go and 
check for obnoxious dogs. They forgot to mention we 
must now check for neighbors who let their dogs out 
early in the morning or late at night. I am not anti- 
dog, I am anti-inconsiderate dog owners. 

More Words From Babes 

I live in Lake Villa and my son goes to school with 
the boy who wants to play iceless hockey. My son also 



plays iceless hockey. My son's question to me was 
"Mom, Ihave seen him play. He can do it. Why won't 
they let him play?" Can anyone answer him? And, to 
the person who referred to disabled children as riff-raff, 
shame on you. 

Vacation Limits 

The folks who come up to the Chain CLakes area to 
vacation need to use more maimers. For. many of us, 
this is our home. While you are on vacation, we still 
have to put our children to sleep at a reasonable hour. 
Shooting off guns, firecrackers, and campfire parties in 
your back yard should end at a reasonable hour. Or, at 
least confine all that noise to the weekends^ We do not 
want to min your vacations but realize that you are not 
alone in the woods somewhere. Your are next to my 
permanent home! 
(Continued oh page 21) 



Pul 

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stock «I30193 




•93 Plymouth Voyager 

Air, 4 cyl, Am/Fm, 
Rear Defogger, 7 Passenger 



4^9^ifperma. 



'93 Plymouth Colt 
2 Door 

Auto., Air, Full Factory Equipment 



194 



00 Hi 

per mo. 




stock #26007 



"2000 down B.Q% APR wilh approvod crodll (or 60 monlha. Plus (ax, Ittio and liconso. 



1989 Ford Probe 

"Hottest Car In 1989" 

00** 



nsi 



per ma. 

JSinan(Ai,*fa90^wa 12.3 APR. dotJttuHliappioutdntiit 




1986 Chevy Cavalier 

2 Door. Can't Beat The Payments 

$QflOO** 

4U^^^ per mo. 

2*moni}iX'tOI»dom\, 129 AfR jocltttUtHoprnixil artlU 



1991 PoQtiac Grand Am LE 

2 Door, Red, Sharp 



per mo 



1988 Volkswagen Fox 

5 Speed, Nicest '88 Around 

$tfZQOO** 

Jm %J^^ per mo. 

2imontlu.'l000ii>uin.lZ3APIL 



1989 Mercury Sable 

Great Transportation 



^144 



00 



«# 



per mo. 

XmonlhX'IOOOdMiin. IISAPH 



1991 Ford Ranger 

Pick-up, Low Miles 

$|QCJOP** 

J, ^7^7 per mo. 

M moflft 'J«0 torn. ;£9 AFfl 



1987 Pontiac Grand Am 

2 Door, Maroon Beauty 

$1fiQ00** 

JL %^^Gf permo. 



1992 Plymouth 
Sundance Coupe 

Like New 

(OinaiiH'IOOOit 



•IOCOii>wn.lt$/IHl 



1987 Chevy Blazer 

5 Speed, lowest Price In Town 

$1 G QOO** 

Mm ^7m# permo. 

ZimonAi, 'tOOOiimm.iZ»AfH 



"f>lutlM.titla,licanM, QiMnitiMliV/khmw. 



CHRYSLER/PLYMQUTH 



(708)336-4500 

■ MD S. GREEN BAY RD. 
i WAUKEGAN ; ■- 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



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FIC named a top 



Business Briefs 



money manager 

LIBERTYVILLE— Nelson 

Publications, a company that tracks 
the investment perfonnance of 1,500 
investment managers nationwide, 
named First of America Investment 
Corporation to its top 20 money 
managers in its "America's Best 
Money Managers." First Bank of 
America Northeast Illinois, based in 
Liberty ville, focuses on equity, high 
income equity and small capitalization 
portfolios over one, three, five and 
ten-year time periofds. 



Insurance company 
moves headquarters 

LINCOLNSHIRE— Washing- 
ton National Insurance Company 
moved its headquarters to a new 
175,000 square-foot building in the 
Lincolnshire Corporate Center. The 
move will affect 700 people. 

First Chicago offers 
new loan program 

ANTIOCH— The First National 
Bank of Chicago, which Has Lake 



County branches in Antioch and 
Deerfield, unveiled a new variable rate 
consumer loan program that allows 
customers to lock in monthly 
payments while also gaining a cash- 
back rebate when the loan closes. The 
'Loan Lite' revolves around a variable 
rate instalhnent loan that is tied to the 
low prime rate. 

Kemper offers new 
simpler investment 

LONG GROVE— The Kemper 
Unit Investment Trusts, a unit of 



Kemper Securiti's Inc., announced a 
new investmer, product designed to 
combine the conservative qualities of a 
unit investment trust with the 
simplicity associated with purchasing 
a mutual fund. 

Lakeland receives 
4-star rating again 

ROUND LAKE— Bauer Financial 
Reports Inc., a bank research and 
rating firm, awarded its four-star rating 
for the fourth consecutive quarter to 
Lakc^ •'d Community Bank for its 
suj^v. "performance, strength and 
saf^^-v, ' 




When it comes to having more power, 
Ray Jagar is the man to call. 

He owns and operates Powersource 
Racing Engines, one of the few 
businesses in the Chicagoland Area that 
specializes in auto racing engines. 



by ALEC Jl'NCJE 

LakA-'Imid Neuspnj)er,s 



Jagar and his staff of four people make 
120-160 racing engines a year. 
Powersource makes engines for all type of 
oval track racing from NASCAR to local 
■short track engines. It takes 144 man 
hours to make one engine. 

Jagar said Powersource lakes slock en- 
gines from Chevrolet, Ford, and Buick 
and takes them apart and makes them 
faster. 

"The secret is in the cylinder and the 
: heads," Jagar said. 

Jagar said he has made engines for 
NASCAR drivers Alan Kulwicki, Dick 
Trickle and the Wallace brothers Rusty 
and Kenny. Powersource currently, makes 
engines for Bobby Hillin and Bob Shack. 

The process begins when the engine is 
sUipped and taken apart. 
(Continued on page 18) 



shop gives racers more power 




Wayne Shaw, above, cleans a piston 
for a 350 Chevy engine .used In oval 
track racing, while Ray Jager adjusts 
the Winston Cup engine ready for 
B8cV Racing in Daytona, Fla. 
Photos by GeneGabry 




The Maids ready to sweep up Lake County 



The Maids. America's Maid Service is 
ready to sweep your cleaning problems 
out the door and you off your feet, said 
Bruce Zimmennann, new owner of the 
housecleaning service franchise. The 
Maids opened in Park City to serve the 
Gumee and Libertyville area. 

"Our studies show that it takes a 
woman approximately seven hours a week 
to clean the typical home," said Zimmer- 
mann. "And let's face it, women, for the 
most part, are the ones burdened with that 
responsibility, whether they work outside 
the home or not. 

"But seven hours a week is a whole. 




Bruce Zimmermann 

Friday, July 2, 1993 



separate work day and most women today 
just don't have that much time to spare. 
The Maids are the service experts who can 
handle a woman's cleaning problems and 
give her niore time to do what she en- 
joys," said Zimmennann. 

The Maids features a four-member 
team of trained cleaners who are insured 
and bonded. "Each team is supervised 
on-site to ensure rooms are cleaned with 
professional care and attention to detaill" 
said Zimmennann. 

The Maids pays all employee taxes re- 
quired by law so that the customer doesn't 
have to. "Our customers get a profession- 
ally cleaned house without havmg to has- 
sle with a stack of tax forms. That's just 
one more benefit of hiring The Maids," 
said Zimmennann.. 

The Maids team routinely performs 22 
housecleaning tasks, including such fine 
touches as dusting floorboards and door- 
jambs, disinfecting toilets and showers, 
and removing lime buildup from .around 
faucets. 

"Our maids are so thorough and partic- 
ular about doing a good job that they use 
a toothbrush around faucets and scrub the 
kitchen floor by hand," said 
Zinunennann. 

The Maids clean each home on a 
weekly or every-other-weekly basis. 
Monthly, spring or fall, and one-time 
cleans for special events, such as a party 
or houseguest, are also available. Prices 
are based on the size of the house. Clean- 



ing products are furnished by The Maids. 

Zimmermann was a commander with 
the U.S. Navy. His wife, Marlene, is a li- 
censed practical nurse. 

The Maids International, Inc., is one 
of the nation's -largest and oldest 
franchised niaid services. Based in Omaha, 
Neb., the company was founded in 1979 



by Dan Bishop, president, and currently 
boasts over 200 franchised units in 35 
states and Canada, 

The Maids has been ranked one of the 
top quality franchises in the nation by 
such magazines as Inc., Entrepreneur, 
Success, Fortune, and Entrepreneurial 
Woman. 



I 









m 
m 



How Often Do Americans 
Have Their Homes Cleaned? 



Monthly 



Every Once 

In Awhile 

6% 



Every Other 

Week 

53% 



Dcila compllod by 

THE MAIDS Intamotlonoi 

from 198M990 




Weekly 
33% 




The Ma! Js' 

America's Maid Service'j 

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*■ 11 



Lakotand Newspapers 17 




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Lakeland Newspapers' BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



-.■(, 



Power 



Real Estate Personnel 



(Contmued from page 17) 

"We completely disassemble the en- 
gine. Wc get the parts cleaned and ready 
for assembly. We then put them on a cart 
and make an assessment 

"It all depends. If it is newer it takes 
longer because the engine has never been 
worked on," Jagarsaid. 

Next the engines are taken to the 
block area where the heads arc smooiiicd 
out. After that Jagar works on the 
cylinders and the job is finished with the 
engine assembly. 



'It's like a marriage. We try 
our best to help them out ' 

— Ray Jagar 



The last step is a dynometer test. The 
test simulates race conditions and is a way 
to determine the effectiveness of the en- 
gine work that has been done. It uses wa- 
ter pressure to put strain on the engine to 
measure its torque, 

"It is the same machine Winston Cup 
teams use. It simulates race conditions, 
gives the average horsepower, how many 
pounds of fuel can be used, and cylinder 
performance. It automatically adjusts for 
the weather conditions," Jagar said. 

Jagar also travels to different races to 
help the racers out 

"Wc bring the small parts. If there is 
a problem he will help them out, and Uiey 
don't necessarily have to be our cus- 
tomers." 

Jagar said his relationship to his cus- 
tomers isclose. 

"It's like a marriage. We try ourbcst 
to help them out. Wc realize that for the 
short track drivers all -their money and 



time after their day jobs is tied into the 
car, and they want the most out of it. 

"We want everybody to finish. We 
have our arguments and fights. If it is our 
fault we will correct it, if not we try to 
reason with them," Jagar said. 

The parts on these engines wear 
quickly and need to be replaced. 

"After 1,500 to 2,100 miles on the 
short track cars the engine needs to be re- 
built. After 500 miles in Supcrspecdway 
the pistons and the heads are replaced," 
Jagar added. 

These engines don't come cheap. A 
new Winston Cup engine costs about 
$30,000. A short track engine costs 
around $3 ,000, according to Jagar. 

Jagar got interested in engine building 
after being a racer. Jagar worked for 
Prototype Engines for 10 years and was 
their track person and engine builder. 

When Prototype went out of business 
two years ago he opened up Powersburce. 
"I scraped up every bit of money I had 
to start the business. We built the build- 
ing ourselves," Jagar said. 

He brought with him from Prototype 
Wayne Shaw, who has 30 years experi- 
ence and Gary Demske who had 10 yeais 
experience. 

Powersource also works on regular car 
engines and boat engines. 

Jagar said his biggest frustration is. 
getting more business from area people. 
He said 9.0 percent of his business is out 
of state. ... 

"Just because we make Winston Cup . 
engines people think we're expensive. No 
one comes in and asks about price. We're 
competitive with any machine shop," 
Jagar said. 

Powersource is located in Hainesville 
on Belividere Road next to the Hainesville 
Village Hall. 




soned real estate veteran of five 
years and consiatently ihowa a 
hi|h level of eothiuieam and reli- 
ability. Mason resides in the Anti- 
och area with her husband and 
two children. 



Linda Mason 

Linda Mason* broker associ- 
ate for Ccmuiy 21 Leech and As- 
sociates, Lindenhurst, has been 
awarded for Professionalism in 
Real Estate for the month of Juno 
by that office. Mason is a sea- 




Pat Bell 

Libertyville resident Pat Bell 



posted five sales valued at over 
$ 1.25 million in the month of May 
to lead Century 21 Kreuser and 
Seller Libertyville office, A li- 
censes agent since^ 1985, Bell has 
been a mulli'millioQ dollar sales- 
person for eight consecutive 
. veois. Bell is a member of Condell 
Hospital Auxiliary, Mainstrcet 
(Libertyville) and Guys and Dolls 
Dance Qub. She and her husband, 
George, and family live in the 
Butler Lake area of Libertyville. 

Jane Chappel 

Libertyville resident Jane 
Chappel posted over $620,000 in 
May sales volume to push her well 
over the million mark for 1993. A 
licensed agent since 1989, Chap- 
pel is also a meml>er of the Lake 
County Homebuilders Assn. and 
the Builder Realtor Council. 






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"It's Rented! 

I ran my ad in the Fox Lake Press and the other 13 
Lakeland Newspapers and the apartment rented within 
the two week run. I always get good response from your 
paper. 

Thank you." 

D.S., Barrington. 

"My washer and dryer SOLD the same day the paper 
came out. The caller saw it in the Round Lake News. 
Thanks Lakeland for the quick response!" 

R.R, Libert3mlle. 

"The response was overwhelming! We had to cancel 
our ad after the first week on our Fox Lake house. We 
only wished we had 30 houses to rent for all those who 
called. 

Thank you Lakeland Newspapers!" 

C.L./Lake Zurich. 



"I was delighted thatl,got quite a lot of calls after 
placing my ad in the Lakeland Newspapers. I got the 
house rented right away. " 

K.C.,Niles. 

"/ always have good luck with your papers. Fve run 
ads with the Fox Lake Press for eight or nine years and 
have always rented the apartment right away. " 

B.S., Mt. Prospect. 

"We often place our Real Estate advertising with 
Lakeland Newspapers because we know by placing them 
in the Classifieds we are covering all the areas we need. 
When our busy office needed additional personnel, natu- 
rally, we placed our dd with Lakelarid Newspapers. 
The response to our ad was remarkable. It provided us 
with a variety of people to interview as well as those to 
keep on file for the future." 

MX., Antioch. 



What A Standing Ovation 
Looks Like On Paper. 

Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds 

Phone: (708) 223-8161 

223-8810 





,30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



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Lakeland Newspapers' BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Exclusive hpWr^ solution to keep channel clear 



Mother Naiure has never been happy 
with Lake Michigan's western shoreline. 
Since pre-hislory, she has expressed that 
distaste by moving it here and there. The 
sandy bottom continually is shifting, oc- 
casionally filling a channel or drastically 
eroding existing beaches. 

Developers of Praiiie Harbor Yacht 
Club planned for this before they built 
what may be the most beautiful and exclu- 
sive harbor on Lake Michigan in the 
ChicagoyMilwaukee area. 

Experienced marine engineer were 
■ brought to the Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin 
harbor to design a plan guaranteed to 
counterbalance and frustrate -Nature's 
restless shifting of sand. It would assure 
Prairie Harbor Yacht Club owners of an 
unobstructed entrance to their home port. 

A sophisticated system of jetties and 
revetments was installed to guard the en- 
trance channel. Then, a dredging plan was 
developed to maintain optimum depth for 
even the largest boats expected to dock in 
the club's marina. 

Dredging isn't unusual for Lake 
Michigan marinas. It is a common way to 
undo what Nature insists on doing. Shift- 



ing sands affect all marinas' channels on 
the western shore of the lake. 

Channel maintenance in nearby public 
inarinas is carried out by the appropriate 
agencies, when and if funds and time are 
available. Prairie Harbor Yacht Club isn't 
provided with government protection, so 
they developed a responsive plan of then- 
own. 

Permits obtained from the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers and the Wisconsin 
Deparunent of Natural Resources enable 
the harbor slip owners' association to pur- 
chase and operate their own dredging 
equipment. The result is the unique ability 
to monitor and maintain their own chan- 
nel. Reaction is swift to any sedimenta- 
tion, without having to wait for govern- 
ment intervention and action. No other 
marina on the western shore enjoys such 
security. . 

Permits call for a maximum 14-feet 
channel depth, with an average 8-feet.to 
10-feet depth. Regularly, the harbormaster 
directs Prairie Harbor's dredging crew to 
clear the channel to that depth and it is 
monitored with sophistical sonar. 

Routine harbor maintenance is contin- 



ually triggered if chaimel depth approaches 
8'. Readings aire taken at specific points 
and charted to detect trends in bottom 



shift. This data is used to give- harbor 
crews direction. Full reports are also avail- 
able to resident captains. ' ■ 




A sophisticated systems of jetties and revetments have been installed to guard 
the entrance channel at the Prairie Harbor Yacht Club in Pleasant Prairie, Wis. 
Developers are working to keep in place Mother Natures shifting shoreline. 



two homes and one bank 




1/2% rate premium on 
a new one-year or longer 

CD when you open a 
Privilege First account. 



This is Tom and Judy. They've spent half their lives working and 
raising a family. Now they want to spend the rest playing and doing 
some things for themselves. First of America has been helping. 

For years, Judy wanted a gourmet kitchen. And she finally got it a 
few months ago with a First of America home equity loan. And it was a 
Homelighf*^ mortgage that made their dream cottage (complete with an 18-hole golf course) a reality. 

They've also got big plans for retirement. So they're putting money into Parkstone Mutual Funds.t 

Then there are those sk, soon to be seven, grandchildren. Tom and Judy want to do all they can for 
them, far into the future. Thaf s why First of America is helping them plan their estate. 

Life can change so much through the years. That's why First of Ameiica 
offers such a vast array of products and services. And why people like Tom 
and Judy have made us their bank for life. A bank for lifel 

CD bremium rate not available on Rising Rate CW or other promotionai rates. $1,000 minimum deposit required. Half percent increase over normal initial per 

annum interest rate offered by the bank does not apply to subsequent automatic renewals. Penalty for eaHy withdrawal. Loans subject to credit approval. TSecunttes-are 

offered through First of America Brokerage Service. Inc. Member SIPC. Securities are not obligations ofFmt of America Mi or its affiltates ondarenot FDIC 

insured Offer available at participating banks only for a limited time. For information, call us at: Fox Lake 587-0601 Bannockbum 31 7-2350 

Lindenhurst 35&^541 Waukegan 244-0880 Lake Zuricli 540^880 Ubertyville 362-3000 Grayslake 362-3000 Mundelein 362-3000 Round Lake Beach 223-3900 

VemonHU^^^^ Wlldwood 362-3000 Winthrop Harbor 872-2960 Zion 746^1211 Beach Fork 249^000 Niles 824-2116. 

Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC TDD available from 9-5 EST at (800)289-4614. 6. 



O FIRST °FA!VlRI.O\ 



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Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Now«papoft 19 



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BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



July real estate 
classes scheduled 

The Century 21 Real Estate Academy has announced 
that five-week, pre-license salesperson courses beginning in 
July have been scheduled at various locations throughout 
the greater Chicago area. 

Roger Peake, regional director of Century 21 North 
Central, Inc.'s Metropolitan region, said classes are 
scheduled to begin^on the following dates: July 6, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., at the Berwyn 
Recreation Center, 6501 W. 31st St.; July 10, Saturdays, 
from 9 ajn. to 4 p.m. at the Oak Lawn Holiday Inn, 4140 
W. 95th St; July 13, Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6 to 9 
p.m., at the Allerton Hotel, 701 N, Michigan Ave in 
Chicago; July 19, Mondays and Thursdays, from 6:30 to 
9:30 p.m., at the LaGrange William Tell Holiday Inn, 6201 
Joliet Rd; July 26, Mondays and Wednesdays, from 6:30 to 
9:30 p.m., at the Naperville/Lisle Radisson, 3000 
Warrenville Rd. 

Successful completion of the salesperson course will 
prepare students for the state exam which is offered almost 
daily at various locations in the Chicago area. Home study 
is also available. All-day reviews, designed to help students 
with the state exam, are scheduled twice each month. 

The Century 21 Real Estate Academy offers continuing. * 
education courses at 11 convenient locations; Information 
on any of the courses can be obtained by calling the 
Century 21 Real Estate Academy at 296-0410 or writing 
- the Academy at 2340 River Rd, Ste. 300, Des Plaines, IL 
60018. Pre-registration is required for all classes. 

Century 21 Metropolitan is a region of Century 21 
North Central, Inc. Century 21 Metropolitan is one of the 
largest real estate sales organizations in the state. . 

$1,000 scholarship 
offered by NNSP 

. The National Network of Sales Professionals (NNSP) 
announces its annual scholarship to be awarded to an 
undergraduate or graduate student majoring in sales, 
marketing, or business. To qualify for the $1,000 
scholarship, students must be enrolled in a four-year college 
or university and meet the following requirements by the 
Fall of 1993. 

Scholarship Requirements: 

Major in Sales, Marketing, or Business at a school 
located in Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Kentucky, 
Indiana, or Missouri, be a full-time undergraduate student 
with a minimum of Junior status, be a full-time graduate 
student with a minimum of second-year status, be a 
part-time undergraduate or graduate student with a 
minimum of one to three terms remaining to complete the 
degree, maintain an above-average academic record with a 
grade point average of B/3.0 or higher. 

"Our group wants to help the next generation of sales 
and marketing professionals and we believe that this 
scholarship is one small way of contributing to the success 
or our profession," said Jan Maber, NNSP Scholarship 
Conmiittee Chairman. 

All applications must be received by August 1. 
Scholarship funds will be awarded directly to the school in 
the student's name for the tuition account To send for an 
application, qualified students may write to: Jan Maher, 
NNSP Scholarship Chairman, Suite 147, 869 E. 
Schaumburg Road, Schaumburg, EL 60194, 

Cellular One to 
open fax hotline 

Cellular One of Chicago announced the introduction of 
its ♦FAX hot line. Tlie *FAX (star 3-2-9) service, provided 
in conjunction with MarketFax, allows Cellular One 
customers to dictate a rncmo or letter from their cellular 
phones and have it faxed anywhere in the world. 

"We're anticipating that everyone from executives to 
home-based business owners like consultants and 
independent contractors will benefit from being able to im- 
mediately send a follow-up letter, a confirmation or an 
.invoice," said Donna Morrison, director of marketing and 
corporate conununications at Cellular One. 

By dialing *FAX, cellular customers, will reach a live 
operator who will explain billing procedures and open an 
account on a major credit card. The customer then dictates 
the facsimile, confiims the details and the operator sends 
the facsimile. In addition to regular cellular airtime charges, 
customers will be billed separately on a credit card for the 
document (based on length and destination). A typical 
one-page letter or memo, confirmed and sent in the United 
States, will cost about $4 plus regular airtime charges. 
♦FAX is available weekdays, 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. and 
weekends, 10 am. to 6 p.m., 



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As requested by several P.T.A. members of local surrounding 

schools, we do not carry any adult magazines for protection and 

a better environment for children! , 






GCOUNTRYO 
rqceK 

^'The Quick Convenient Store" 

Comer of Rockland Rd. & Milwaukee Ave. 



Support Your Local Country Grocer 

(708) 362-5226 

PLAY HERE Trr JTVT TT> Q . Mon.-Sat. 6 a.m.-lO p.m. 
■TlVJiJrVO. Sun. 7 a.m.-lO p.m. 

Libertyville 




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20 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, July 2. 1993 






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July 2. 1993 



GET "IT" OFF 

YOUR CHEST 

(708)2^3-8073 



LIPSERVIGE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page lis) 

Thanks, but 

I am from Ingleside and we appreciate the community - 
concern shown by Baxter Labs by adopting Wilson 
Road for clean up. Perhaps as a fiirther sign of their 
community spirit, they could advise their employees 
that the roads around Baxter such as Wilson, Fish Lake, 
etc. have 35 mpb speed limits and are residential areas. 
You can always tell when there is a shift change because 
the area is turned into a speedway. 

Who is in charge? 

Beach residents wake up. Who is running your 
village? It is the SURE party. You have more people 
from Lake Villa and West Miltmore at your meetings 
than Round Lake Beach residents. Shame on you, 
citizens of RLB. 

No pride 

We are missing the pride in the Heights. The streets 
andLthe area is a mess. No wonder we have a flooding 
problem, the storm sewers have not been cleaned. 

No contest 

I am angry about the $200,000 great home give-away 
contest sponsored by the Chicago Tribune. For eight 
weeks they teased us and got us to send in stuff. Then, 
even when it was over we never heard who won. 
Finally we called and were told that there was a winner 
but they did not want to publish it because of the Bull's 
publicity, Ithinkit was unfair because it was too long, 
it cost us too much money, and they do not have the . 
decency to tell us about the winner until after all the 
Bull's publicity dies down. 

Tell the truth 

Now that school is over, it is time to tell the truth. I 
know the boy that apologized about that teacher. The 
only reason he did it was because our parents made him 
do it. She is worse than what he said. I could write a 
whole book on what she did. The whole class got 
yelled at. I don't think he should have apologized. 
Please print this. 

Horn blowing headache 

I would like to make a conmaent about the complaints 
about the sirens. They are nothing in comparison to the 
train whistles. Instead of doing a couple of short toots, 
they lay on those whistles. Why don't they just put in 
crossing arms instead of torturing citizens all night' 
long. Maybe we should put up a sign which says no 
whistles after 10 p.m. 

Don't stereotype 

It is crude that a Vernon Hills person has the gall to 
categorize the average income of Round Lake. lama 
proud resident and believe me, your guess-ta-mation was 
way off. But, I can understand that because you are a 
Vemon Hills snob. 



Small ponds 



It is amazing how some of these small town 
politicians get such swelled heads. They quickly lose 
sight that their salaries are paid by the taxpayer and that 
they are employees. 

Long pier 

Use caution if you swim or dive in Fox Lake near 
Stanton Point Road in Ingleside. They have been 
allowed to put in a 200 foot pier without lights. I want 
the proper authorJties who are in charge of the length of 
piers to investigate. Children and home owners have 
rights too. 

Warm welcome 

This is the Round Lake Area Welcome Wagon. If you 
have just moved into the area, are getting married, or 
having a baby get in touch with us. You may be 
eligible for a basket full of free gifts and valuable civic • 
information. Call the Welcome Wagon at 740-7505. It 
is a conununity service and completely free. 

Check the laws 

The donations from the different villages are our tax 
dollars. I think a referendum is needed before this 
money can be turned over for the teen center. Don't 
count on it passing. The Round Lake residents don't 
care about the schools, why would they pay for a toen 
center? 

Doesn't get it 

I am from Fox Lake. I don't understand a recent article 



concerning a boat fire. First it says that the boat was a 
total loss resulting In $30,000 in damage. Then, it says 
that the passengers were rescued by nearby boaters. 
How then does Jakstas "save the day," as your headline 
pronounced? You also failed to mention his other good 
deeds, which he charges to go on. 

^ 

Happy reader 

A big thanks (o your reporter, Spencer Schein. He 
did a woiiderftil article about my son's accident It made 
the front page and I got a great response ^om others 
concerning child safety week. 

Give turtle back 

I am from Grand Avenue in Lake Villa. Will the 
person who stole our cement green turtle from our front 
yard please rehim it? It has great sentimental value. A 
reward will be offered. Thank you. 




Still waiting 



Last month I called in asking for a stop sign at the 
comer of Woodridge Drive and Ronald Terrace. We still 
don't have it. Get on the stick Reclaim the Beach! It is 
still a block and a half away from the school. 

Where are you 

Where have the building commissioner and the 
politiciaiis of Fox Lake been to have not noticed the 
Roaring Twenties Tavern building all boarded up? I am 
sure that none of these business people would have 
allowed this eyesore to face their establishments. 
Where is his clout? 

Speeders are equal 

I am from Park City and I have something to say to 
"Thieves in the night". Do you think that Vemon Hills 
speeders are better than those in Round Lake? Richer 
does not mean better. I hope you get pulled over soon. 



Congratulations 



I am a student from Round Lake High School and 
want to congratulate the teachers and administrators who 
are retiring diis year. Thaidc you for all the years you 
have helped make Rctund Lake a great school. 

Sticker discrimination 

This is for the Antioch Police Department. J want to 
know why the only place they check for village parking 

stickers is Oakwood Knolls? Any other time, you do 
not see them in the subdivision. 

Big bet ?. 

I am from Ingleside and just found out that the 
biggest bet in Lake County. The question is how long 
is it going to take the residents of Round Lake Beach to 
figure out that their village is being run by the same 
rocket scientists from Lake Villa. Is hanging still 
allowed? 

Loves time change 

This is the big hooray for the trustees of Round Lake 
Beach. They voted tavern closings to be 2 a.m. for . 
everyone! How about taking a survey to find out how 
these tavern neighbors feel about this. Some of the 
problems are related more to noise than alcohol. 

Lake Villa revisited? 

People from Round Lake Beach should go to the next 
meeting. The mayor is trying to hire someone to do 
the clerk's job. He will be spending your tax dollars 
twice. I smell something foul, like Lake Villa. 

Lawn service? 

It is a pretty sad day when the Grayslake village has 
resorted to using a wonderful little old lady to mow the 
lawn in the East Lake Farm subdivision park pit. Wake 
up village. We are paying taxes. Why isn't this 
property taken care of? 

Budget cutting idiot 

To all of you complaining that Lakewood Forest 
Preserve is a dump: eat it Think twice next time 
before you elect some budget cutting idiot. Or is it 
possible that the budget is only cut for public preserves, 
but not for key areas like the dog owners only site? 

Environment versus money 

I want to congratulate the Waterway Management 
Agency on their proposal of their no wake-zones 100- 
200 feet from shoreline. It is about time someone 
started thinking about erosion and conditions of the 




Lakeland 

Xewspapcre.; 



lake. These are more important than the profits of the 
marinas. These spmlboats have turned it into one big 
mud hole. 

Unfair raises 

How can the Lake Villa school board justify giving 
two people in administration a 20 percent raise while 
only giving teachers a five percent raise? Who is 
educating our future leaders? 

Tax terror 

I am calling from Mundelein and am appalled at the 
real estate taxeS; They have been going up every year. 
People caimot afford to live in Lake County anymore. 
And, what do we get for our money? Road congestion! 
We are leaving. 



Big bill 



Why can't mechanics be honest with you in the first 
place? I just got an $800 bill for an eight-year-old car. 
I don't think it is worth it. They should tell you this in 
the begirming instead of stringing you along. 



Unhappy voter 



Unfortunately, the residents of Fox Lake have been . 
cursed with an incompetent mayor and a very slanted 
zoning board. They have managed to stir the ire of 
residents of Ingleside, Wake up Fox Lake before it is 
too late. 

Editors note: We must ask you again to not 
call in repeat messages. We will only print 
one message per week per person. If' your 
gripe or concern is lengthy, please consider 
sending a letter to the editor. 

No bars 

Does anyone know, if there is a singles club m Lake 
County? I do not want to go to a bar. I am sure there 
is someone out there that wants to meet me. 



Enjoyed movie 



I would Uke to thank the First National Bank of 
Antioch for providing the free movie presentation of 
Aladdin at the Antioch Theater. With the donated food 
going to the Antioch Food pantry, everyone benefited. 



Legal expenses 



This is in response to Sue Hanson about 
Semmerling's budget. How much do you spend on 
legal fees? You have everyone mad at Jim and you are 
doing nothing. What are you, the queen? 

Child censorship 

I am calling about your Lipservice. I think you 
should have a special Lipservice for kids with a separate 
number. You should msist that kids leave their home 
phone number so that their parents can okay the 
message first 

Ham mad 

I am from Ingleside. Tell the DJ who threatened to 
use a sledge hammer on the ham radio operator, that the 
radio operator is now in my area. Come on by and I 
will be happy to accompany you with my sledge 
hammer too. I will karate chop the ham fadio operator 
for free. 



Anti-cable person 

I am glad I get to read Lipservice and see people 
griping about the cable systems they subscribe to. No 
one told you to subscribe to them! Turn the damn 
thing off and read a book. Don't pay for television. 
Television should not be pmd for. Rehook up your 
antenna. ■ 

Nose out of joint 

I'd rather have my nose stuck up you know where 
than be a hill-billy from Round Lake. You people from 
Round Lake are so rude. I have not met anyone 
friendly from Round Lake. Not everyone m 
Libertyville makes $20,000 a year. I am from 
LibertyviUe. 

Prefers horn to sirens 

I am calling in regards to the person complaining 
about the trains. Obviously, this person is' not aware of 
how many crossings there are in Antioch, Many of 
those crossings do not have gates. Evidently, you are 
(Continued on page 59) 



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Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 21 



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Center offers e; 



detection aids for 




Nancy Schumer, nurse coordinator for the Breast Center, discusses self- 
examination procedures with Lillian, a fonner patient and current volunteer in the 
Breast Center.— Photo by Connie Kindsvater 



Although the risk of breast cancer 
increases as women age, the newly 
opened Breast Center at Highland Park 
Hospital can help women of all ages to 
. be well informed about the disease and 
to learn about early detection and how 
to manage their own risk factors. 

A female in her 20' s has only a . 
1/20,000 risk of developing breast can- 
cer; but, by the time she is in her mid- 
50's her risk has increased to about 1/30 
and, by age 80, her risk is 1/10, accord- 
ing to Dr. Arthur G. Michel, breast sur- 
geon and medical director of the Breast 
Center. 

"Age is the single most important 
risk factor for a woman in developing 
breast cancer at some point in her life," 
said Dr. Michel, "and the second most 
important factor in assessing risk is a 
family history of breast cancer." 

Current figures published by the 
National Cancer Institute show that the 
overall risk of a woman developing 
breast cancer at some point in her life 
is 1/8. 



Nancy Schumer, nurse coordinator 
for the Breast Center, stresses that 
monthly breast self-exams are a vital 
link in early detection of breast cancer, 
combined with physician or health- 
care professional exams, and mam- 
mography. In dealing with breast can- 
cer, the earlier it is detected, the greater 
the possibility for successful treatment, 
according to the American Cancer So- 
ciety. 

Two early-detection aids are of- 
fered to women, free of charge, by the 
Breast Center. Women may call and 
request the free videotape, which 
shows the proper procedure for breast 
self-examination, and the free, lifelike 
model of a breast containing realistic 
lumps, which help women learn to 
recognize the early warning signs. The 
center's phone number is 480-2650. 

When a woman comes to Highland 
Park Hospital for a routine inammo- 
gram, she is also given tlie opportunity 
to have a personalized, breast cancer 
risk analysis at the Breast Center and to 

a 



learn the proper procedure for breast 
self-examination from Schumer. Or, a 
woman may call the Breast Center and 
simply schedule an appointment with 
Schumer for the risk analysis and edu- 
cation consultation. 

"We want to care for the needs of 
women at all levels of breast care," said . 
Schumer, "from early detection to di- 
agnosis, if there is a problem, to treat- 
ment, if they do have breast cancer. 
And, all along the way, we give the 
women emotional. support" 

In fact, Schumer is on call 24 hours 
a day, if needed, to calm a woman's 
fears or to answer questions that she 
may have, ranging from "I just found 
this lump; what does it niean?" to "How 
do I tell my children that I have breast 
cancer?" Schumer is reassuring to her 
patients, answering their questions 
with true facts that will help them deal 
with their concerns. 

If there is a suspicious lump found 
by self-examination or a routine 
mammogram, the Breast Center spe- 
cializes in fjacilitating the process of 
tests, diagnosis and treatment options, 
usually in just one consultation ap- 
pointment, 

"The goal of the Breast Center is to 
greatly lessen the time from when a 
woman is aware of a lump to the diag- 
nosis, time that is very nerve wracking 
for her," said Schumer. "Fortunately/ 
eight out of ten lumps end up as be- 
nign and not dangerous." 

During the consultation visit, all 
necessary tests will be done. After a 
short wait, the woman will then meet 
with Dr. Michel to learn the results of 
the tests. ' 

Dr. Michel calls together an appro- 
priate panel, specialists such as a 
medical oncologist, pathologist, radi- 
ologist and plastic surgeon, to go over 
the patient's diagnosis and treatment 
recoihmendations with her. She is en- 
couraged to have members of her fam- 
ily, close friends or her own personal 
physician in attendance during the 
consultation, if she chooses. 

"Dr. Michel knows how to explain 
medical technology in an easy-to-un- 
derstand way," Schumer said, "en- 
abling a woman to make an informed. 



individualized decision about her own 
treatment." 

The best prevention against breast 
cancer is early detection, stressed- both 
Dr. Michel and Schumer.They feel that 
the best form of early detection is the 
routine mammogram, which can pick 
up early changes in the developmental 
stage in breast tissue. 

"Changes in breast tissue give off 
calcium," explained Dr. Michel, "which 



hv CONNIE KlNI)S\.vn:K 



show lip on a mammogram as calcifi- 
cations. A cluster of calcifications is 
more. suspicious, but only 10-15 percent 
of those clusters end up being canoer." 

"Because cancer cells grow at a slow 
rate, a mammogram- can find liimps 
before they are big enough for a woman 
to feel them," Dr. Michel said, "which 
gives us twp-to-three years lead time in 
treating them." He pointed out that 
mammograms are less reliable in 
younger women because their breast 
tissue is more dense, making it more 
difficult to pinpoint changes in the tis- 
sue, 

"The Breast Center exists for the 
prevention, evaluation and treatment 
of breast disorders," explained Dr. 
Michel. "It is a state-of-the-art place to 
get breast cancer care, the largest, 
comprehensive,, multi-disciplinary 
breast center in Lake County, and it. is 
open to all." 

"The goal here is to have a center of 
excellence and a place where women 
can come whether they have breast 
cancer or not," said Schumer. "We 
spend tune with each patient; we try to 
be as reassuring and supportive as we 
can." 

Anyone interested in learnings more 
about the Breast Center at Highland 
Park Hospital, in receiving information 
on breast health or breast disease, in 
scheduling a mamniogram at High- 
land Park HospitaUor in obtaining a 
second opinion on a breast-related 
medical diagnosis can call a single 
phone number: 480-2650. 



Plastic surgeon cuts recovery time with technology 






In this age of spiraling medical 
costs and impending health care re- 
form, one local plastic surgeon is 
beating the Clintons to the punch by 
providing his patients with exclusive 
state-of-the-art service at more afford- 
able prices. 

Thanks to the pioneering technol- 
ogy behind the KTP/532tm Surgical 
laser System and its new computerized 
scanning device, the Hexascan™ De- 
livery System, Gary S. Churchill, MD, 
FACS, is treating <minor skin lesions 
with dramatically improved results. 
The Hexascan is a boon to patients as it 
requires little or no anesthesia while 
greatly reducing operative recovery 
times. 

With the Hexascan Delivery System, 
Dr. Churchill Is able to treat common 
vascular and pigmented skin lesions 
{i.e. port wine stains, cafe-au-lalt, spi- 
der veins, sun spots and age spots) with 
a precisely controlled and consistent 
amount of laser light in a hexagon 
shaped pattern ranging in size from 1 
to 13 mm. Due to its high power, elim- 
inating the need for anesthesia. Pa- 
tients say that the laser feels like a pin 
prick on the skin. 

"Other laser systems used to treat 
vascular lesions, like the candela laser, 
leave dark purple spots that last up to 
10 to 14 days," said ChurchUl. "The 
KTP/532 laser doesn't produce those 
unsightly spots, allowing patients to re- 
turn to work the same day as the treat- 
ment" 

Within the next few months, Dr. 
ChurchUl vi/ill take the technology one 
step further and become the only plas- 
tic surgeon in the area to perform 



minimal incision laser facial cosmetic 
surgeryi such as face and eyelid lifts. 

The laser system — which uses 
KTP/532 (Potassium Titan yl Phos- 
phate) synthetic crystals to produce a 
unique, visible emerald green laser — is 
delivered through a tiny, tapered glass 
fiber, allowing Churclilll to perform 
highly precise surgical treatments. The 
laser beam can cut, vaporize (destroy 
damage or diseased tissue), and coagu- 
late (seal blood vessels) simultane- 
ously. This not only reduces bleeding, 
swelling, and pain, it also enhances re- 
covery time when compared to tradi- 
tional surgical procedures. 

'-'Minimally-invasive laser surgery, 
with its reduced discomfort and' recov- 
ery times, is widely recognized as the 
'future' of pur Industry," said ChurchUl. 
"New applications for laser surgery are 
being created at an exciting pace, pro- 
viding consumers with a growing array 
of surgical options." 

While laser surgery has been avail- 
able on a large scale at- hospitals and 
universities since the early 1980s, its 
availability through physicians' private 
practice is a recent development. 
Churchill, whose practice is focused 
exclusively on facial cosmetic and re- 
constructive work, is the only private 
practitioner in the Chicagoland area 
and one of approximately 50 physi- 
cians nationwide to offer his patients 
in-office treatments with the KTP/532 
Surgical Laser and Hexascan Delivery 
System. The FDA granted marketing 
clearance of this specific laser technol- 
ogy for plastic surgery in September 
1992. 

This new laser technology is only 




Dr. Gary Churchill treats a minor skin lesion with the surgical laser system. This 
state of the art technology produces dramatically Improved results at a fraction of 
the cost when compared to traditional procedurev. The laser is especially effec- 
tive in treating common vascular and pigmented ski lesion such as port wine 
stains and age spots; 



one of several innovations Churchill 
has brought to his practice in Barring- 
ton. In 1989, he introduced computer 
Imagery to help his patients better en- 
vision how they would look, after a par- 
ticular treatment. Currently, Churchill 
is seeking accreditation /certification 
from" the Accreditation Association for 
Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) for 



his office surgical center. Typically re- 
served for ambulatory health care or- 
ganizations such as clinics, HMOs, 
community health centers and imme- 
diate care centers, Churchill will be one 
of the few private practices to go 
through the detailed, multi-step pro- 
cedure. 



Lovel 

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22 Lakofand Newspapers 



Friday. July 2, 1993 



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Lakeland Newspapers' LIFELINE 



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. July 2. 1993 





Love Youi Heart 

by GAROLE STERN 

Like most Americans we will be celebrating the 
Fourth turning toward the outdoor grill^to celebrate our 
nation's holiday. These recipes will allow you to enjoy 
the holiday, but not forsake. healthy eating. Add your 
own family favorites to these for an unforgettable 
holiday. 

Mediterranean herb steak 

1/3 cup olive oil 

1/4 cup lemon Juice 

3 tablespoons dry sherry or water 

2 teaspoons dried tarragon 

\ teaspoon dried rosemary 

1 teaspoon dried pregano 

2 garlic cloves, minced . 

1 1/2 teaspoons chicken-flavor, instant bouillon 
1 1/2 pounds sirloin steak, cut 1 Inch thick 

In large shallow dish, combine all ingredients except 
meat; mix well. Add meat, coating well with marinade. 
Coven marinate in refrigerator 4 hours or overnight, 
turning occasionally. Prepare outdoor grill for cooking 
or preheat broiler. Remove meat from marinade. Pour 
marinade into small saucepan and place overhigh 
heat; bring to a boil. Remove from heat Grill or broil 
meat 4 to 5 Inches from heat source 15 to 20 minutes, or 
until of desired doneness, turning once and basting 
frequently with marinade. To serve, carve into sL*ces. 

Serves: 6 

Per Serving: Cholesterol (mg) 92 Fat (gm) 22 
Calories: 348 

Star Studded tomatoes 

2 cups smdl pasta (orzo, tubettlnl, stars or other small 
shape) 

8 large tomatoes 

1/4 cup Italian dressing 

1/4 cup reduced -calorie mayonnaise or salad dressing 

1 pacluige (10 ounces) frozen petite peas, thawed 

3 green onions, coarsely chopped 

2 ribs celery, finely chopped 

1/4 green or red bell pepper, coarsely chopped 
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil 
1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 



4 ounces shredded nibzzarella cheese 
8 black olives sliced 

Prepare pasta according to package directions; 
dntln. Slice tops off tomatoes; with a spoon , scoop out 
seeds and discard. With small knife, carefully separate 
inside pulp of tomatoes from outside shell, leaving a 
1/4-inch thick shell. Coarsely chop pulp and place in 
colander to drain excess liquid. Invert shells onto a 
paper-towel-llned jelly -roll pan. refrigerate until ready 
to use. 

In medium sized bowl, combine dressing, mayonnaise, 
peasj green onions, celery, bell nappsr, basil and 
oregano; mix well. Stir In drained tomatoes and pasta. 
Just before serving, fill tomatoes with pasta mixture; 
sprinkle mozzareUa cheese on top. Garnish with olives. 

Serves: 8 

Per Serving: Cholesterol (mg) 2 Fat (gm) 6 
Calories 297 




Officers chosen 

The Northern Illinois 
Chapter of the Association 
for Women's Health, Ob- 
stetric, and Neonatal 
Nurshig (AWHONN) an- 
noimces its officers for the 
1993-94 term: Chapter 
Coordinator, Lynette 
Ament, CNM, MSN; Secre- 
tary, Lyn Hallberg, RN: 
Treasurer, Judy Broske, 
RN: Legislative Coordina- 
tor, Pat Petry, RN: Mem- 
bership Chair, Pat Siko- 
rski, RN, MS: Hospitality 
Chair, Jaiiice Cries GrifQn, 
RN, MSN; Public Relations 
Pam Kula, RN. Program 
Committee members are 
Lois Bullman. RN, MS, 



committe chair, and 
members Pat Petty and 
Judy Broske. The next 
Chapter meeting will be 
September 15 at 6, p.m. 



Child care 

Free training series, 
"Foundations of a Family 
Child Care Home" will be 
held at Condelt Medical 
Center in UbertyvilJe, July 
13 and 15 from 7 to 9:30 
p.nL and at the YWCA of 
Northwestern Illinois in 
Waukegan on July 17 from 
8 a.rrL to 4:30 p.m To reg- 
ister call 662-4283. 



Hospital 



TheVictoiy ifyouor 

^ • . .' . someone 

Memorial youiove 

is 
stniggllDg 

Dependency witii an 

DMM»4m alcohol or 

Program ^^ 

addiction, a single phone 
call can put you in touch 
with the professional, 
confidential help you need. 
DoQ't wait another d^ - 
make the caU that can 
change your life. 




/Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



1324 North Sheridan Rd. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 



Mira Kupisek, M^D; f 

is welcoming pients« 
at her new offices 
located in the 



\ 





resetiting... 



Victory Mammography 
Screening Service 

Our mobile unit will be rolling into your community 

bringing this vital cancer detection service to a 

location near you. In just minutes, skilled health 

care professionals, using the latest and most 

accurate technology, will gently guide you 

through the procedure. 

COMPLETE SCREENING ONLY $60 

Visa and Mastercard accepted. 

Call 1-800-877-XRAY to schedule an appointment. 
Walk-ins also available. 





Victory Medical Building 
100 M Atkinson Road 

(corner of Center Street and Atkinson Road) 

Suite 109 
Grayslake, Illinois 

For information or to make an appointment, call: 

' (708) 223-205? 

Dr.Kupisek is a primary care physician specializing in 

Internal Medicine. Her practice concentrates on the 

prevention and treatment of illnesses in the adult body. 





LOCATION SCHEDULE 



Time: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 



Friday . July 9 & 23. 1993 

Venture, 2700 Belvldere Road 
^ Waukegan, Illinois 

Tuesday , July 13 . 1993 

Victory Medical Building, Walden Square 
Atkinson at Center Street, Grayslake, 111. 



A service of Victory MemorinI Hospital . 1324 N. Sheridnn Ronil . W.iukog.in . 708/360-3000 



Robert R. McCormick University Clinics 
University of Health Sciences/ 
The Chicago Medical School 

is presenting with Chicago HMO 

on 
ThursdayJulyl5J993 

from 
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

-A SENIORS' HEALTH FAIR — 



Free Health Screenings 
Free Health Promotion Literature 
Health and Wellness Presentations 
Questions & Answers with Faculty 



North Entrance Mall o£ the University 
3333 Green Bay Road North Chicago 

RSVP 578-3000 ext. 680 



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They're back— dreaded mosquitoes are here! 



Major outbreaks of 
adult mosquitoes are oc- 
curring throughout north- 
eastern Illinois due to the 
recent heavy rains, e3cten- 
sive flooding, and warm 



temperatures. 

The main culprit is the 
flood water mosquito, 
Aedes vexans. The recent 
rains and floods have 
provided ideal breeding 



sites for this mosquito 
species and various other 
species of temporary pool 
mosquitoes. Eggs that 
Vkrere laid in low-land ar- 
eas can remain donnant 



Start summer lawn 
care practices now 




Sfi>» 



Hot weather of sum- 
mer can put lots of stress 
on lawns and other turf 
areas. Before sunmier's 
hot weather sets in, take 
action to help lawns get 
through the heat hi good 
condition, suggests Bruce 
Spangenberg, Extension 
Horticulture Educator 
with the University of Illi- 
nois Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service. 

One of the first modi- 
fications for summer 
should be to mow the 
lawn higher. A cut of up to 
tliree inches is suggested. 
If in doubt, Spangenbei^ 
advises to set the mower 
as high as it will go for the 
summer. Grass main- 
tained at a iiigher height 
of cut withstands heat bet- 
ter, dries out slower, usu- 
ally develops deeper 
roots, emd has less crab- 
grass invasions than 
closely mowed turf. 

Summer rainfall varies 
from year to year, but is 
seldom enough to keep a 
lawn green all summer. 



Spangenberg suggests 
homeowners decide early 
whether to water all 
summer as the lawn 
needs it to stay green or 
let the lawn go dormant 
Do not let the lavra turn 
brown and then decide to 
water it back to a green 
condition, then allow it to 
tum brown, etc. This de- 
pletes energy reserves and 
stresses the plant. Dor- 
mant lawns need only 
one-quarter to one-half 
inch of water every two to 
three weeks to keep root 
and crown tissue alive. 

When watering, do it 
early in the day if at ail 
possible. Water deeply 
and infrequently, apply- 
ing about one to one-and- 
one-half inches per appli- 
cation, depending on site 
variables. Be sure water 
soaks in. Watch for early 
signs of a need to water 
the turf, including foot- 
prints remaining after 
walking on the grass and 
an overall dark color of 



wilting turf. 

Most other lawn care 
practices are best left until 
the early fall period, ac- 
cording to Spangenberg. 
These practices would in- 
clude fertilizing, thatch 
control, and applying 
weed killers. If applying 
fertilizer in early summer, 
be sure to use a slow re- 
lease or controlled release 
nitrogen fertilizer and 
keep application rates 
low. 

Seeding lawn areas is 
also best left until early 
fall, rather than summer. 
Lawn grasses trying to get 
established in summer 
are competing with many 
annual weeds, along with 
the heat Seedling blight 
potential wUl also be 
higher in hot weather. 

"Help prevent addi- 
tional lawn stress on your 
lawn this summer by 
keeping foot and vehicle 
traffic off the grass as 
much as possible during 
the heat, " concludes 
Spangenberg. 



for months or even years. 
However, flooding of 
these areas stimulates egg 
hatch resulting in larvae 
("wigglers") that eventu- 
ally develop into biting 
adult mcsquitoes. During 
warm weaOier, develop- 
ment from egg to adult 
may occur in as few as 10 
to 14 days. The 
mosquitoes are vicious 
biters and are especially 
annoying at dusk and 
later in the evening. They 
are strong flyers and may 
migrate several miles 
from their breeding site 
over a period of a single 
day. 

The following recom- 
mendations may help to 
minimize many of the 
problems mosquitoes 
cause. . . 

• Eliminate any stand- 
ing water in such places as 
eaves, old tires and toys, 
because they serve as a 
breeding site; empty and 
clean Bird batiis and 
children's pools each 
week. 

• Curtail the use of 
colognes, per^mes, or 
after-shave lotions; 
mosquitoes are attracted 
to these products. 

• Wear protective 
clothing to reduce the 
chance of being bitten; 





light-colored clothing is 
less attractive than gar- 
ments with darks colors. 

• Use a repellent when 
in mosquito -infested ar- 
eas; DEET (diethyl-meta- 
toluamide) Is the most 
effective product 

• Spray tall grass, areas 
around doorways, and 
other adult resting sites 
with an appropriate insec- 
ticide. 

• To idll mosquitoes 
quickly at picnics, apply a 
mist of pyrethrin or an- 
other flying-insect spray 
from a pressurized can; 
spray the areas around the 
tables and chairs, but be 
careful not to allow insec- 
ticide spray to contami- 
nate food or dishes. 

Permanent bodies of 
water, such as ponds, 
abandoned swimming 
pools, and garden pools, 
should contain top -feed- 
ing fish to each any 
mosquito larvae that try to 
develop. Gambusia, 



known as mosquito fish, 
most bait minnows, or 
guppies will eliminate 
any "wigglers" (larvae) 
that are present If the 
water is very shallow, the 
fish may die from heat or 
freezing and may have to 
be replaced occasionally. 
When selecting fish, real- 
ize ihzt Gambusia mBy be 
very difficult to find since 
they do not overwinter 
here, guppies need water 
that Is at least 60 degrees F 
or warmer. Also, goldfish 
may not eat enough 
mosquito larvae to be ef- 
fective. Minnows. from a 
bait shop will probably be 
the cheapest, most avail- 
able form of season-long 
control. The "wigglers," 
which are aquatic, can 
also be controlled with In- 
secticides. Bacillus 
thuringiensis israeliensis, 
a bacteria that kills only 
the larvae of mosquitoes 
and closely related In- 
sects, is available In most 
garden centers. 



Plants can make our world better 



According to the Gar- 
den Council, plants can 
help you make a world of 
difference in the envi- 
ronment—beginning in 
your own backyard. Plants 
are not only beautiful but 
they work diligently by: 

•Cleaning the air by 
removing harmful chemi- 
cals indoors and out 

•Preventing wind and 
soil erosion. 

•Reducing heating 
and cooling costs by 
shading and insulating 
the home. 




"Making your home 
and backyard a more en- 
joyable place to be. 

•Providing you with a 
relaxing form of exercise: 
gardening. 



•Attracting wildlife by 
providing food and shel- 
ter for birds and small 
animals. 

•Adding pleasure to 
your life with sweet scents 
and great tastes. 

•Increasing the quiet 
and seclusion of your 
yard. 

•Sheltering you from 
glaring sun or harsh 
winds. 

•Naturally and 
screening out undesirable 
views and enhancing 
pleasant one's. 



GARDEN 



RTE.12& 

50 




Volo. Illinois 
815-344.1117 



SUMMER HOURS: 

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FHI. 8-8; SAT. 8^; SUN. 8-5 



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•54 

FLOWERING CRABS 
Starting al '60 NOW 

•36 



PINE TREES 
Starling at *75 






% 



OFF 



WUif Bu4f - When yon Can (lent 

roil .11 II li:iDll ;IPII II ;ii Jll Ml -HI. 11:11 JinilJll ;ll. IMDII :il :i 




Reggie Ramfelloinr says: 
"Eiwe Need It — Rent It From Ram*' 




•Trucks & Trailers 
•Stump Grinders 
•Shredder For Tree Limbs 
•Chain Saws 
•Rototlllers 
•Trenchers 



•Overseeder 

•Thatchers 

•"Mini" 2 yd: Dump Truck 

•Aerator 

•Backhoe 

•Front-end Loader 



}▼ J TOOL EQUIPMENT (708) 740-8800 
111 



RENTAL & SALES 1-(800) 974-8801 




ENTALiNc. ^^.^Kffi'pT"^'"^ nE«©fflS.. A^ 



Mh of July Sale 



Save on Geraniums, Baskets, 
Flats & More In-Store Specials I 



•Perennials 
•Rose Bushes 
•Miniature Roses 



•Potting Soil 
•Peat Moss 
•Heits 



•Qematls 
•Shrubs 
SIOPUVTODAr 



See Our New Line of jj^^^ 

Statuaries • Fountains & More Studio 



10% Oiic 

Senior Citinm 

Tu-Wed-Th 



Open dally til 6pni; Sot Ul 4pm; Sun 9am5pm;aoscdMondnys ■, 




open 
Year Aoiuiil 



ft\ 




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may coi 
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24 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, July 2,1993 

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July 2, 1993 

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gardens— beautiful accents iii0m yard to hpuse 



If you'd like to turn ; 
your landscap e into a 
homescape, try a butting 
garden. Cutting gardens 
may contain just about • 
any plant, tree, shrub or 
flower, as long as it's 
suited to grow in your en- 
vironment And, the cut- 
tings will brighten your 
home for the entire grow- 
ing season. 

Cutting gardens are 
relatively new to the 
United States, but they're 
rapidly increasing in 
popularity. They add nat- 
ural color and beauty to 
the landscape while 
growing outdoors and, 
once. cut and moved in- 
doors, add warmth and 
personality to any house- 
hold. 

Growing a cutting gar- 
den is a unique practice 
because the garden is 
grown specifically to be 
cut and brought indoors 
for decoration. Once 
started, it is not difficult 
to maintain. But, it is 
important to start out 
right with healthy 
seedlings that are suited 
to your environment, 
fertile soil, ample 
sunlight and regular wa- 
terings,. 



Planting the cutting gar- 
den 

As with any garden, 
only plants suited to your 
soil and climate will grow 
with health and little 
maintenance. Check with 




a local extension agent 
for a list of flowers, 
siirubs, trees and any 
other plants that are 
well-suited to your 
regioa Then, select a , , 
VBuriety of plants from this 
list If you're limited on 
garden spaced select a few 
flowering plants with col- 
ors that-coordinate with 



the interior of your house. 
A few coiorfid favorites 
that grow around the 
country are marigolds, 
zinnias, baby's breath, 
black-eyed Susans and 
geraniums. 

Once you've selected 
the plants for your cutting 
garden, you must select a 
good planting site and 
prepare the soU. For 
flower beds, choose a site 
that receives at least six to 
eight hours of sunlight a 
day. The soil should 
drain well and be rich in 
nutrients. To. organically 
add nutrients to the soil, 
apply three to sbc inches 
of peat moss or compost 
and a balanced organic 
fertilizer over the soil . 
Then, tiU or spade the 
area to a depdi of eight to 
12 inches. 

Now that the soil is 
ready, spread a landscape 
fabric over the bed. Ex- 
perts recommend one 
that blocks sunlight and 
helps the soil retain 
moisture, such as 
WeedBlock by Easy 
Gardener. When the 
fabric is in place, cut 
small x'is or circles in the 
fabric, then plant the 
seedlings directly into the 




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soU. Water the seedlings 
weekly, about one to one 
and one -half inches, to 
ensure healthy growth. 
Cutting the cutting 
garden • 

■ Once your plants reach 
maturity, they can be cut 
for indoor arrangements. 
But, before you head out 
to the garden, gather a 
pair of gloves, a sharp flo- 
ral knife or scissors, and a 
clean bucket half-filled 
with lukewarm water. 

The best time to cut 
plants and flowers Is early 
morning or early evening. 
Each stem must be cut at 
an angle then immedi- 
ately placed stem- down 
in the bucket of water. Try 
to cut flowers with at least 
10-inch stems, so that you 
can trim them as needed 
for your arrangement 
When you've collected all 
the plants and flowers 
you want, cany your 
bucket of cuttings inside 
and spray them with an 
antitranspirant spray, 
such as Plant Saver by 
Easy Gardener. Spraying 
freshly-cut plants and 
flowed with Plant Saver 
will ensure water . 
retention and re due e 
stress on plants after they 
have been cut, helping 
them stay and look 
fresher longer. Then, al- 




low the flowers to stand 
in deep water in a cool 
place for several hours or 
overnight. 

Before arranging, trim 
each stem again, this 
time holding it under 
water wliile.you cut Cut it 
at a sharp angle to allow 
more surface area for 
water to enter. 
Arranging fresh flowers 

Before making your 
cutting arrangement, 
thoroughly clean your 
vase with bleach, then . 
rinse it well. If your vase is 
large, you may want to 
place floral foam in the 
bottom to bold the stems 
in place. 

Begin by filling your 
vase wdth room tempera- 



ture water. The first flow- 
ers to use should be the 
tallest and the primary 
color in the arrangement 
Always use odd numbers 
of each flower or color to 
create a strong, visual 
pattern. 

Once the larger 
flowers are in place, add 
the secondary flowers of 
coordinating colors. 
Finish the arrangement 
by adding smaU accents, 
such as baby's breath, 
ornamental grasses or 
evergreen clippings. 
Then, place your 
arrangement anywhere in 
your home v^ere it will 
receive plenty of fresh air, 
sunlight and praise from 
all, who see it 



PRODUCE 



STARTING 



Red Ripe 



Super Sweet 





& 
Tomatoes! Snap Peas Corn! 




Strawberries 



Open Daily 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

veoc-^fLv (^unt^^^' umpkin 



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toets 



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Summer 
Squasli 




FARM 



JC 






CALL USI 566-2176 



All Produce Subject To Availability. 



' \ 



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Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Newtpopori 25 



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ANITIQUES & CRARS • ANTIQUES 8c CRARS 






•ANTIQUES 8c CRARS •ANTIQUES & CRARS 



Antique alley 

On Sunday; July 18, 
Antique Alley Mall will 
celebrate Its third birthday 
with a celebration that has 
something for everyone. 
The mall which has over 
3, 000 -square-feet of an- 
tiques and collectibles is 
located at 415 S. 
Washington in Fox Lake. 
The celebration will entail 
"Let's Make a Deal Sale," 
prize drawings every 15 
minutes, a mini flea mar- 
ket, music, and refresh- 
ments. 

Also on that day the 
Artist Showcase (located 
in the mall) will present 
Susan Lenart with her 
jewelry and apparel cre- 
ated from ancient stones 
and fabrics from around 
the world; R/F Associates 
with pieces from selected 
artists, and Kaye 
, Westermann with her 
wooden, hand built repli- 
cas of 19th century home 
accessories. 

The festivities will be 
held from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. CaU 587-0091 for di- 
rections or further infor- 
mation. 

Quilt show 

The MUlbum 
Congregational Church 
will be having a Quilt 
Show and Ice Cream 
Social on Sunday, July 18 
from 1 to 4 p.m. The show 
will be in Lauren Hall at 
Mlllburn Church, 19073 
W. Grass Lake Rd., Lake 
VUla. 

The quilts will be from 
the collections of 
MiUburn Church mem- 
bers and friends of the 
church. There will be an- 
tique quilts, new quilts 
and quilted items. 



CLC to offer jewelry class 



How to transform dis- 
carded items into beauti- 
ful jewelry will be taught' 
in a Jewelry making class 
(GSS5U) offered by the 
College of Lake County in 
July. The four-week course 
will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. 
on Mondays beginning 
July 5 at the Area 
Vocational Center, 19525 
W. Washington St., 
Grayslake. 

Students will leam to 
use their creativity and re- 



sourcefulness to design 
and create jewelry from 
corrugated cardboard, 
cork wrapping paper, 
beads, friendly plastics, 
clear vinyl, ribbon and 
other odds and ends 
found around the house. 

The cost is $35, plus $5 
materials fee payable at 
the first class meeting. For 
course information, call 
223-3616. To register, call 
223-6601, ext 2573. 



Sale at Lambs 

Antique Show and Sale 
at Lambs Farm will be 
held on Sunday, July 18 
form 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Dealers from all over the 
Midwest bring their best 
prices on antiques and 
quality collectibles. There 
wlU also be live music. 
Cost is $2 for adults, chil- 
dren 12 and under are 
free. Call 362-4636 for fur- 
ther information. 

Mundelein Days 

Arts and Crafts 
Fair/Business and Indus- 
try Fair will be held at 
Mundelein Community 
Days. The arts and crafts 
fair features up to 32 
crafters. The business and 



Still available 

There are still some 
spaces available for the 
July 16, 17, 18 Gurnee 
Mills Summer Art and 
Crafts Show. For applica- 
tions contact Judy Fre- 
mont, P.O. box 1064, Be- 
loit, WI 53512-1064 or caU 
(608)365-2133. 

Holiday show 

Registration is being 
accepted for the Round 
Lake Area Park District's 
Holiday Craft Show to be 



held, the weekend before 
Thanksgiving. Partici- 
pants interested in dis- 
playing their crafts and 
would like to reserve a 
table, stop by the Com- 
munity Center, 814 Hart 
Rd., Round Lake or call 
Heather Moliilarl at 546- 
6558. 

Antique show 

Lake County 
Promotions holds its . 
Antiques and cbllectable 
Show the second Sunday 
of every month at the 



fairgrounds, Routes 45 
and 120 in Grayslake. 
Hundreds of exhibitors 
from several states will 
sell their collections form 
the past. From tlie largest 
items to the smallest, this 
established and well- 
recognized show is for 
both the serious and 
casual collector. 

Viewing hours are 8 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. Adult admission 
is $2. For more 
information call (708) 
223-1433 or 356-7499. 










Lambs Farm plans traditional craft fair 



Industry fair is an oppor- 
tunity for local business 
and non-profit organiza- 
tions to promote their 
business. The U.S. Post " 
, Office will have a display 
on July 3 at which a spe- 
cial cancellation stamp 
will be sold. The special 
cancellation stamp was 
designed by a local high 
school art student This is 
a very popular item with 
stamp coUectors. After its 
use on July 3, the cancel- 
lation stamp is destroyed, 
making those issued a 
unique collectors item. 



Traditional American 
craft and art Items will be 
sold by more than 170 
exhibitors at Lamb Farm, 
1-94 and Route 176 
(Rockland Road), 
Libertyville, July 24 and 25 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., 
both days. Free admission 
and parldng. 

A portion of the pro- 
ceeds from this show will 
dlrectiy benefit Lambs 
Farm, a non-profit com- 
munity In Libertyville that 
provides vocational, resi- 
dential and social support 



services to nearly 190 
mentally handicapped 
adults. For more informa- 



tion about the arts and 
crafts show call Art Plus at 
325-8080. 



Appllqued sweatshirts 



Judy^s Ceramic Station 

"Full Service Ceramics & Teaching Studio" 



•Firing 

•Greenware 

•Bisque 

•Gifts 

•Classes 



!*I. 



00 



I 



OFF with any $5.00 purchase 
with coupon. Exp. 7-17-93 



I 



Stop by and SEE our special for our 
sidewalk sale July 9th, 10th, 11th. 
230 N. Cedar Lake Rd. 



Round Lake, IL 60073 



708/740-1000 



Duncan 
Studio Stains 
I 'Dona's Hues 
J -Delta Shiva 
Solid Oil 
Painstll<s 
Call for 



Hours & Class Times 





L 



GRAMPT'S 

AWMQUE STORE 

Routes 47 & 173 
Hebron, nitnois 

Open Daily 10-5 

Sat. & Sun. 10-6 

815-648-2344: 





Christmas In August! 



NeuK 

Custom 

Frflmingi 



STITCHERY 



Specializing in Counted Cross Stitch 
HOURS 35 E Crystal Uke Ave. 

M, T, W, F - 9:30-4:00 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 

TH-9:30-8:00; Sat-9:30-3:00 (81 5) 455-5470 



iSALE^DATESi: AUGUST 5; 6, 7 



.«• 



White Buffalo 
Ceramics, Inc. 

Howard & Rosemary Hunt 
Greenware - Classes - Firing 

Christmas IN July Sale 

July 6 thru July 11 
A// €SreGnvifare is , 

30% OFF 

with $10.00 purchase 

Mon., Tu»^ wS; 9.4 * 6-9 B'ue Diamond Kilns 

Closed Thursday 3341 9 RtO. 83 

Frl. 9-4 P.O. Box 393 

' Sat. 10-4 Grayslake JL 60030 

Sun. 12-3 Phone (708) 223-4622 




CRAFT St ARX FAIR 

Village Square Shopping Ctr. 
SW Corner Rts. 12 & 22, Lake Zurich 

Sat., July 10, 10-5 

Sun., July 11, 11-4 . 

75 Craftersfrom a 4-state area 

For more information, call Craft 
Show Promotions, Inc. 

708-231-8644 



•••••••**••••••*•••••**•••••** 

I PENNY LANE ANTIQUES i 

• ^-:»;«r\ of Crystal Lake J 

-Two Locations- -^ 




* 




• y^j^X- 61 14 Lou Ave. • (815) 459-8828 -k 
-kajy 51 1 1 E. Terra Cotta • (81 5) 455-0998 • 
.4r Both Stores Offer Quality AntloLies At Lower Prices! A 

• A Fine Selection of Antiques, Coins & Collectibles * 
I Experience the Difference I 

i( Open All Year • 7 Days a Week • 10:00 mm.-5:00 p.m. if 

• ■ ANTIQUES ARRIVING DAILY • 
•••••••••••••A**************** 





CRAFTERS WANTED 

July 17-18 
Green Meadows Resort Round Lake, IL 

Outside spaces: $35 for 2 days, $20 for 1 day. 

July 24-25. 
Sam's Club Racine. WI 

Outside spaces: $40 for 2 days, $30 for 1 day. 

Fundraiser for Children's Miracle Network 

Sign up for both shows< save up to $15. 

708-r546'6441 708-740-0541 



^bitiqucs 
^adisori 



Air Conditioned 

•60 Dealers 

•Plenty of 
Parking 

Open Year 'Round 

Weekdays: 10-5, Thursdays 'til 9 

Saturdays: 10*5, Sundays: Noon-5 

4748 Cottage Grove Rd., Madison, WI 

(1/4 Mile East of Route 51) 608-222-2049 



flR EARMS DOUOtfT. SOU? t mAoJ o 

GUN SHOP 



WANTED: Antique Firearms & Military Relics 



Wanted To Buy: 

Fine Collectible Firearms and Military Relics. 

Boss - Colt - Fox - Parker - Purdy - Remington - 
Sharps - Wallers - Winchesters 

Cash - Corjfidential 

400 New-Used-Collectible Firearms in Stock 

Ammo: Modern - Metric - Obsolete • 

Scopes - Cases - Books 

(414)551-9699 
1452 Sheridan Road • Kenosha, WI 53140 

(7 mites east of 1-94, use Exit 339) 
Mon. & TTiure. 10-3; Tu^s. & Fri 10-5; Sat. 10-3; Closed Wed. & Sun. 




SOI 




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26 Lakeland Newspaper! 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



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Relics 



Relics, 

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153140 

Wed & Sun. 



.July 2, 1993 




There 



1< III DAY 



[Parent Group 



The Parent Group, Inc. sponsors weekly Parents 
I Anonymous self-help support groups-at no charge. 
1 Parents attend these groups out of their desire to be bet- 
ter parents. No cost structured child care Is available dur- 
ing all meetings. The groups meet In Waukegan on Friday 
mornings from 9 to 11 a.m.; Thursday evenings in Vernon 
I Hills from 7 to 9 p.m.; and In Zion oh Tuesday evenings 
from B to 9 p.m. and Wednesday afternoons from 3 to 
4:30 p.m. For more information call 263-7272. 



SUNDAY 



SOLO events 

SOLO Singles Club will be holding a fourth of July Picnic at 
noon at the Lakewood Forest Preserve, west of Fairfield Rd and 



Hwy. 176,' Wauconda. "ShelterA." Bring beverages and dishes to 
pass, On July 7 there will be the weekly dance at the Princess 
Restaurant, 1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvlite, from 8 to 12 
p.m. For more informaUoh on these events, call 816-1011 or 362- 
6455. 

WON meeting . 

widowed Outreach Network of Lake County, a group oi men 
and women of all ages, meets the fourth Sunday of each month at 
the Condell Day Center, 700 Garfield, Uberty^le at 2 p.ia The 
next meeting v>^ll be June 27 and the subject wlU be Insurance 
Needs. Dinner at a local restaurant will be optional. For further 
information call 362-263L ' 



'IlJi:SI>AY 



Young Single Parents 



For parents who are single, divorced or widowed, between the 
ages of 21 to 60, join Young Single Parents Club every Tuesday at 
the Uptown Ballroom, 62118 22nd Ave., Kenosha, Wis. from 8 to 
11 p.m. for dancing and socialization. For more Information call 
Buzz at (414)652-1677. 



WliUNESDAY 



Alzlieimer's Support Group 

The Chicago Area Chapter of the Alzheimer's Assn. sponsors 



Alzheimer's Support Groups in Long Grove the second 
Wednesday of each month, 1 to 3 p.m. and the third Wednesday 
of each month, 7 to 9 p.m. at Maple Hill Nursing Center. These 
informal sessions are designed for people to meet others coping 
with' Alzheimer's disease and caring for Alzheimer's patients. The 
meeting are free and open to the public For more information 
call 933-1000. ^ 



TIIIIKSUAY 



Exctiange Club 

The Exchange Club of Grayslake meets every Thursday at 
noon at Randell's Restaurant in Grayslake. Visitors and prospec- 
tive members are invited to join the club for lunch and leam more 
about the Exchange. For more information and reservations con- 
tact Bob Wegge'at 223-0777, Monika O'Connor at 223-5547, or 
JoAnn Ritzwoller at223-816L 

Adult volleyball 

Recreational volleyball for single young adults ages 21 to 38 will 
be sponsored by the Catholic Alumni Club from 6:30 p.nL until 
sunset on Thursdays from now through September at Willow 
Stream Parte, Old Checker Rd., two blocks west of Buffalo Grove 
Rd. in Buffalo Grove. There Is no charge for playing. For more 
informaUon call (312)726-0735. 




^el World 



Arnold best superhero 

We don't know about the general public, but after 
three openings in a row starring Stallone, monstrous di- 
nosaurs, and now the. one and only (thatik goodness) 
Arnold, we have seen enough fiery car crasties, watched 
way too many buildings explode, and the body count got 
oiit of hand after we took our shoes and socks off. 

"Last Action Hero," rumored to be Mr. 

Schwaizenegger's swan song as far as superhero parts are 
concerned, is by far the best actilon picture so far tliis sum- 
iner. 

The writers have wisely still kept Arnold's dialogue to a 
minimum, and for those who love his crashin', basliin', 
smashln' style, he's in good form. In fact Amold'is looks 
seem to improve with age with the addition of a softer 
handsomeness. 

For those of us who have seen enough big screen qual- 
ity kills to last us for several life times, the things that raise 
"Action" a level above the average are the several shots of 
himior that break the bloody monotony. 

Stealing the entire picture is Austin O'Brien, playing a 
juvenile movie buff, whose hero is supercop Jack Slater. 
Throu^ the magic of a ticket given to his friend the movie 



WILMOT 
SPEEDWAY 

WILHDT, wiKcniin 



Let's Go 
Rvacing! 

Saturday, July 3 




Sprints - Modifieds - Sportsman - Mini-Sprints 

Oita Op« at4i pjn.*Sprint Thm IHMi It 6:16 pjn. lUm start Profflptly at 6:45 pjR.^ 

<aAdJts,*6Sen»is&SliKle(its12&aderMlhli),>2IOdsS-n,)(ids7&UndefFre9 ;, 

Wilmot speedway located on Kenosha 
County Fairgrounds, 1 73 lo Wilmd Hd. ' 
Wllmot Rd. North to County W. County W 
to Fairgrounds & Speedway. 
(70B)e3B-RACEor(4U) 662-2446. 



Sponsored by 

Midwest Motorcoach 



■ Us out 




,/> 



ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



AMk About Our 
RfcrtiMion SpeeiaUl 



APARTMENTS 

A Place You Can'CaU Home! 
Hwy 83 & North AvenuQ • Aniioch, IL 
395-0949 • Evenings by Appointment 






^fyierica 



Holiday ParlT 

Rtes. 134 & 12, Ingleside 
2 Days Of Summer Fun 

Live Bands, Sxhibits, Cornival, 

Arta & Crafts, Flea Market, Cor Show' 

And So Much More 

VENDORS NEEDED FOR 

Food Booths Floa Market 
Crafts . Trade Exhibits 

Antiques ' Gar Show 

For boo til applications & 
festival info, call 

(708) 662-3677 

Friday, July 2. 1993 



projectionist by Houdini, O'Brien is transported into 
Arnold's movie world, and they are carried back into the 
real world. 

The plot thickens as Arnold discovers that punches in 
the real world hurt, yet he still conquers evil in the person 
of Charles Dance whose main shtick is his changeable 
glass eye, the best one having tiger stripes. 

Dance changes from a movie to a real life villain when 
he gets a hold of the magic ticket and follows Arnold and 
O'Brien off the screen to ManhattaiL 

The best part of this flick is not the many impressive 
action sequences, but Director John McTiernan's ex- 
pertise in having his characters laugh at themselves 



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through cameos like the one where Schwarzenegger takes 
a cue from Sir Lawrence Olivier and tells Hamlet's stepfa- 
ther he "made a big mistake" in killing his father. In fact, 
the phrase "big mistake" is carried throughout the filnt 

One of the best sequences reminded us of a Wrigley 
commerciar wherein Jack Slater meets the real 
Schwarzenegger and wife Maria Shriver at a premier. 

The explosive violence has this one rated PG-13. 

On the (guess the whole world hasn't really gone to the 
dogs) venue, we hear that child star O'Brien was given a 
few four letter word to utter by the script He refused and 
threatened to walk saying/Tm only 12 years old." Bravo 
Zulu, young man! 

As this type of,movle goes - and we hope it soon will - 
this one rates four out of five stars with the humor and 
special effects the real stars of the show. 

For film gourmets, skip It, especially if you have seen 
any of Arnold's previous moneymakers. The dead bodies 
are the same and if you've seen one explosion you've seen 
them all!— by GLORIA DAVIS 

' T T ; T If T f T I T I T T i T T I 



LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 708-550-0000 
ROUTE 12.EAST OF ELA RD., LAKE ZURICH- 

S6.00 ADULTS • Sa.OO CHILDREN (UNDER 11) 

._ ^^^ MON.FH*. UNTIL 5 PM •• MM 

*3.00 SAT. A SUN.-FIRST AFTERNOON SHOW *3.00 



MOVIES AND TIMES START 7-2-93 



Arnold Schwarzenegger, 
Austin O'Brien 



THE FIRM (R) 



CHECK OUT THIS WATERFRONT! 



To the Chain-O-Lakes. 3 bed- 
room. 1-1/2 ba!h home looks I 
like new and has more thanj 
enjoyment to offer. Oak tutchen, I 
ceramic floors, large closets] 
and convenient laundry. Living 
I room with sliding doors leading 
to 3 level decK overlooking! 
water and very private yard. 3 
car garage, fenced yard, sea-' 
wall plus much, much moreM 
Call today and really enioy the 
summer in liiis very nice home. 



m 



i^::-iyii 



Only $139,900 

Call Darlene Kornbeck Barnas 
k. at 395-3000 exU 124 

'^ ^ RE/MAX ADVANTAGE 

^ \Mmi S32 Lake St., Antioch 




CiNEpUx OdEON TllEATRES 



. ^Jurassic Park (PG-13) {Digital) (on 2 screens) 

ll;40-l;40-2a0-4:20^:00-7:00-7;40-9:40 Late Show Fri-Sun 10:30 



'*TTte Finn (R) (Dolby) (on 3 screens) 

12:00-1:00-3:00-4:00-6:00-7:00-9:00-10:00 



^Sleepless in Seattle (PG) (Dolby) (on 3 screens) 
12:OO-l:OO-2:15-3:15-4:3O-5:30-«:4S-7:45-9;00-l0:0O 



Uave (PG-13) (Dolby) 

daUy (ex. Mon) 1 :45-4.-00.7:20 Men 1:45-7:20 

Sneak Preview FREE WILLY (PG) (Dolby) (No BwBaln Malincc) 

* 4:00 Monday Only 



Clifflianger (R) (Dolby) 
9:50 



What's Love Got To Do With It (R) 

2:00-4:30-7:00-9:25 



Last Action Hero (PG-13) 

1:30-4:15-7:00-9:40 



1:15-4:4&«:1S 



SNOW. WHITE (G) 



1:4S-«-7-9 



DENNIS THE MENACE {PG} 



2:15-4 dO-7nB30 



SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE (PG) 



1:55-4:2M:45-9;05 



LAST ACTION HERO (PG) 



1:05-3:4M:20-9 



CLIFFHANGER (R) 



1:30-3:S5-6:2&«:SS 



DAVE (PG13} 



2-4:15*:25^5S 



"71 DTS - DIGITAL THEATER SOUND EQUIPPED 

JURASSIC PARK (PG13) va^i^e^ 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 

178 l»K( Sr INttOCH 
1<IS 0?16 



I ADULTS CHILOm C Undir) 

S2** UNTIL 5PM 



LAST ACTION HERO (PG13) 



DAILY l2:4M:aa€;15-9 



LiBcnryviLLE r& 2 

708 N rvllLWAUKEE 

LIBERTYVILLE 

367-3011 



'4"»&uirs'2" 



CHILD (II I Undtri 
FIRST AFIIKNCON SKOW 



WALT DISNEY'S 



SON IN LAW (PG131 



WHITE fG) 



DAILY 1-3-5-7 



DAILY 2:15-4:154:308:45 



GUILTY AS SIN (R) 



DAILV 9 PM 



llflCHtPlHT I & 2 

i70«CRE(NS1 McHENRT 
(11)1 IKOiii 



-tl.SOren PEflSQH 

ONCE UPON A FOREST (G) 

DAILY 1:15-3-4.45 



t4.MA0UUS JZ.M CHILD 

SON IN LAW (P613) 

DAILY 2:30^:304:45-9 



11 ft UNDER) $2.00 TILL 5 PM 

GUILTY AS SIN (R) 
DAILY 6:30 • 6;4S 



SHOW PLACE 1-8 - 815-455-1005 

ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31, CRYSTAL LAKE 

S5.00 ADULTS $3.00 CHILDREN (Undor 11) 

•3.00 MON.-Fm. TIL 5 P.M.. SAT. & SUN.-FIRST AFTERNOON SHOW 



MO VIES AND TIMES START 7-2-93 

1:3a4-6;30-9 



LAST ACTION HEREO (PG13) 



DAVE (PG13) 



SLEEPLESS IN SEAHLE (PG) 



1:50-3: 554:4D.6:5(^ I 



2:2a4;2a6:504;S5 



DENNIS THE MENACE fPG) 



2:30-4:304:254:25 



„ SNOW WHITE (G) 



1:45-3-.30-5:1 5-7-9 



CLIFF HANGER (R) 



2.-05-4:i&4:154:35 



DTS - DIGITAL THEATER SOUND EQUIPPED 
JURASSIC PARK (PG13) 1:3a3:55«:1^:45 



*No Passes 



*Dennis the Menace (PG) (Dolby) 
1 :30^:30-530-7:30-9:30 



WILLIAMS 
SIBEtT 



THE FIRM (R) 



DAILY 2-54 



CBAYSLAKE OUTDOOR ■ 
RT. B3/RT 120 __„ «^^^ 
GRAYSLAKE 223-8155 



^r^ OPEN DAILV 

*^ SHOW STARTS 8:M 

1 '> »$.00 ADULTS 

*^ CHILD ni « Unitof) FREE 

4 JURASSIC PARK (PG13) 
J ALSO 

T GROU 

LTTT 



McHENHf aUTOOOR 

•■— 815-3B5-0144 



Oi'EN DAILY 
SHOW STARTS B:30 PM 
tSM ADULTS 
L11 « Undfi] FREE 

(PG13) 
ALSO 



A>. 



..%",< 



:•- 



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Lak«land Newtpaport 37 



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■■'■•«! ' 




n5oN'T5"cbqii^^ P 





Any Order $10.00 or More 
from RJ's Carry Out 

Coupon good thru July 31, 1933. Not 
valid with any other offers. One 
coupon per person. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



i^'s Eatery, 

I & The OatbQcli Bar " 

I 1913 E. Grand Ave. ♦ Lindenhurst 







RESTAURANT 

& 

LOUNGB 



OPEN DAILY ^i 
11:00 AM ^# 

Inleneciton Uwv4i ;T 
«,137(Buckleirfi4);jJ 

Phone 689-9062:,: 

?rHB HAPPENING PLACE \-« 

NOW SERVING' BREAKFASTMA^ 
^^^J Sat; Jk Sun* 7 AM , :^^mm 

• • * . ♦ * 

. • * * ^* -_■ 




FUIXVr;:7MOO]V 

FAMILY RESTAURANT 



BREAKFAST * LUNCH * DINNER • OPEN 24 HR. 



C 
I 
I 
< 
I 
« 

« 



PHONE NtCE ATUOSPHEFB-REASOMBLE PBICES-FAST SEflVlCE 

1/4 mile So. of Rl. 137 on Rt 41 



708-689-0733 





tradition at 



For over 35 years, ihc Kwiaikowski 
family has been serving up fantasiic food 
features at Bill's Pizza and Pub. From" 
their humble beginnings in 1957,* the 
restaurant has expanded considerably. 

From carry-out to a complete lunch and 
dinner dining extravaganza, expect only 
the best at Bill's Pizza and Pub. 

The restaurant is located on the comer 
of Route 45 and Diamond Lake Road in 
Mundelein. Bill's Pub moved into the 
current location in 1967 and has done 
extensive remodeling since. 

The restaurant is decorated in a north 
woods motif with many fish and animals 
adorning the walls. The wood burning 
fireplace only adds to the rustic 
atmosphere 

Mary Ann Rouse, one of the family 
members managing the reslau rani says, 
"My dad caught many of the fish you see 
on the walls." 

The restaurant is famous for its pizza 
and pizza puffs. Now, a frozen version of 
these delights can be found in at least 10 
local grocery stores. 






m 



T4e [^c^le^i/ G^e 

Friday 4:30-8:00 p.m. -^ Parade Sat, 1:30 

Shrimp Stir Fjy or All-U-Can 

Eat Deep Fried Cod Dinner • ..*0.99 

8ftUndor*3.90 

Saturday 12:00-6:00 p.m. Dollar Day Cookout 

Burgers, Brats, Sausage^^^ ,-. .'t.Op 

Hot Dogs Or Ice Cream fnsats ; , ,2 For M.OO 

Sunday-e a.m.-t p.m. All U Can Eat Brunch 

Firetvorki Sun. At Dusk ^Z 10 & Undor *2.9B 

Rto; 120 in Round Lake (E, of Fairfield W, of Cedar l^ke) 

V Open Wed.-Sun.» (708) 546-0190 • 

*Cafe OpenTo The Public At No Extra Charge 



•Dining 

Room 

•Cocktail 

Lounge 

•Catering 

•Banquet 

Facilities 





Jims 



TiNi rooo 



The Pub offers two kinds of pizza". The 
thin crust pizza has a golden flaky crust 
that is out-of-this-world. For a more 
hearty appetite, the double decker pizza is 
for you. 

Besides pizza, Bill's Pub also has many 
appetizer selections. Tamalcs, jalapcno 
Cheddar poppers, fried zucchini and 
mushrooms, arc jiist the thing to start off 
your meal. The flowering onion is the 
latest taste treat to be added to the menu. 

All of Bill's pizzas arc made fresh to 
order. And, they use the highest quality 
ingredients available. For something 
unusual, try Bill's Mexican pizza. This 
12" or 14" favorite has taco meat, 
mozzarella and cheddar cheese, green 
onion, tomato, black olives, and the 
optional jalapcno peppers. 

Kids of all ages enjoy the electronic 
game room and complimentary peanuts. 
Shells on the floor, please. 

Stop on in to enjoy the comfortable 
rustic ambiance or call 566-5380 for 
delivery or carry-out. Either way, it's 
delicious! 

July SpecIaIs! 

• Jois Us On Our BeAuriful Dsck 
OvEnlook'mq BANqs LaUc For 
SpEciAi ApperizERS 
Or Coolisq Cockmltsll 

' DAJly SpECJAls 

pREpARcd by Chefs 
JiMiviy Ci Kelly 

KaRAOUe ENTCRTAiNMCNT On 

SATundAys In Our LouNqcIIl 

SuncIay BauNch 

Scnvtd frtotvt IOa.m,'2 p.M. 

FwiuaiNq Owtlnits cooktd lo ondtit by Clicf 

Kiliy, plus A llUqC MSORIMCM of lior bRuUMI 

ENmcs plw A pMiRy mUe. 

Adiiln...'«.9! Kidt (10 i> uadn) .,.'S.9S 



Whether you're looking for a 
thick juicy burger or a cool lite 

salad or salad bar - 
^^emkim HAS IT ALL 

^ OnHtl».I1«ml««W#Ho(BL«onLlrUt 



Jutt 10 mInJiM WmI of Of lyiM* ' 



(815)385-9869 




SteftkHouie 







Ysyy 



POLISH-Al^kRlCAN SMORGASBORD 



217 N. Route 31. 
McHen:y ■ 
(1 Mile S.dRle. 120) 

815-344-0330 



Open Tues.-Sun. Closed Mondays 

^ ^^ SURPRISE COMPANY? 

^j.M... SUMMER PARTIES? 

Bring em' To Warsaw, 
we've always got room - 
Call a few minutes ahead and we'll be 
waiting for you. 




Lunch Tues. thru Friday 11-4 p.m. 

Only^4.95 



I 



313 E. LIBERTY WAUCONDA 

"OmhokinsBeautifulBangtlakB'' 



526-6905 




u 



This Week ^"'"" 

EARLY BIRD 
DINNER 
SPECIALS 

BroQed Bay Scallops .7.95 Broiled Pork Chop 7,95 

BYied Lake Perch 8.95 Barbeque Ribs 9.95 

Broiled Whitefish 9.S5 Petite Prime Rib 10.95 

Sorry, dinner coupons wl!I ivA be honored \vllh these specials. 




stormtt 



3035 BELVIDERE STREET * WAUKEGAN. IL ■ (708) 336-0022 



i 



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im, 






Led by ^ 

Basic Mi 

religious 

exclusiv 

Congre 

recomn 

PH,1(SV 

Tr 







by JEI 

Def 
ment 
Bcverl 
Naval 
before 
evenir 
Orlant 
dispuf 
point 
meml 

in 
matcf 
while 
almd 
were 
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recu; 
train 
Fore 
-mi 

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the 

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38;Ix]ke(dhdJhigivip<3per« 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



^ 



,c.^UJtU«ftqij;i^>>rfi^^:^,l;L-i»^^^ 



H-W*rf. ' h- »• 



Lakeland Newspapers' COUNTY NEWS 



M 









te 



tlouie 



leSl. ' 

,1te. 120) 
-0330 

5 

ANY? 
1ES1 

om- 

•Ube 



I p.m. 



4:00 to 6:30 




hop 7.95 

9.95 

ib 10.95 

these specials. 

nxmd 

> (708) 336-0022 



i 







Be care£uL be leMl 



when 




^ — ■ ■ — ■ ' ■ 

Led by their company commander (right), recruits march everywhere during 
Basic Military Training (BMT); to and from classes, meals at the galley, and even 
religious services. BMT - normally referred to as "boot camp" - will be done 
exclusively at Naval Training Center Great Lakes if both President Clinton and 
Congress approve the Base Closure and Realignment Commission's 
recommendation to close NTCs at Orlando and San Diego.— Photo by 
PH1(SW)BobUndel 

Traimng will consolidate 
at Great Lakes for Navy 



by JEFFREY P. BROWN 

Defense Base Closure and Realign- 
ment Commission (BCRC) Member 
Beverly Byron's motion to close the 
Naval Training Center Great Lakes died 
before it got to a vote last Saturday 
evening, while the motion to close NTC 
Orlando passed unanimously, 6-0. And a 
dispute about hospitals became a crucial 
point of discussion among commission 
member. 

Interestingly, most NTC comparisons 
matched Great Lakes against Orlando, 
while NTC San Diego was considered 
almost separately. And although there 
were seven members on the commission, 
Commissioner Robert D. Stuart Jr., 
recused himself from deliberations on the 
training centers, sayinjg that living in L^e 
Forest, HI. - four miles from Great Lakes 
- mightbias his decision! 
" A mere 48 hours before the commis- 
sion met in Washington to select which of 
the U*S. Navy's three boot camp sites 
would receive the consolidated trainees, a 
report that the Naval Hospital Great 
Lakes would cost millions to upgrade and 
repair, nearly scuttled plans to ccnu^lize 
recruit training here, according to the 
Medical Facilities Office of the Defense 
Department 

Early news reports indicated that the 
commission would adjourn for Saturday 
evening, after considering various Naval 
Air Facilities and Stations for closure and 



realignment during Saturday afternoon. 
But after a dinner break, the members re- 
turned, and their debate turned away from 
the facts and figures compiled over sev- 
eral months al>out the two training cen- 
ters^ and focused on a comparison of the 
hospitals at Orlando and Great Lakes. 

Specifically, the scrutiny was on their 
ability to expand and take on the thou- 
sands of new recruits and staff members 
who would patronize them, depending on 
which training center was selected for ex- 
pansion. According to Rep. Bill 
McCollum (R-Fla.), the cost building a 
new hospital at Great Lakes and issuing 
treatment "vouchers'* for the thousands of 
veterans living in central Florida, would 
bring the Navy's savings from closing 
Orlando almost to zero. 

The Naval Hospital Great Lakes was 
built in 1960, and is a 15-story, 800-bed 
facility. It's age compares favorably with 
other medical facilities in the Lake 
. County area, including the present Lake 
Forvjst [111.] Hospital, built in 1942, and 
St. Therese Hospital in Waukegan, which 
was originally constructed in 1929. 

Currently over 130 beds at the Naval 
Hospital are occupied, although the hospi- 
tal provides a variety of in- and out-pa- 
tient services to over 74,800 patients in its 
"catchment area," which/according to Ll 
Kathy Serbin, the hospital's Public 
Affairs Officer, is the geographic area in a 
(Continued on page 31) 



Each year, people . 
throughout the U.S. use 
fireworks in their July 4t|> 
celebrations. Unfortunately 
each year thousands misuse 
fireworks and seriously in- 
jure themselves. According 
to the U.S. Consumer 
Product Safety Conmiis- 
sion, approximately 10,000 
people eveiy year are treated 
in emergency rooms 
throughout the country for 
fireworks injuries. 

The Lake County 
Health Department offers 
the following tips for 
having an injury-free 
Ind^jendence I>ay: 

• First of all, remember 
that nearly all fireworks are 
illegal in the State of Illi- 
nois. These include, but are 
not limited to, founCains, 
Roman candles, rockets, 
firecrackers, shells and 
cherry bombs. Only 
sparklers, snakes and some 
smoke-emitting devices are 
legal. Therefore, not only 
may you be endangering 
yourself, you may also be 
breaking the law: 

• Never allow young 
children to play with fire- 
works. Even sparklers, 
which many consider a 
"safe" fireworks, bum at 
very high temperatures and 
can easily ignite clothing. 
Older children should only 
use fireworks under close 
adult supervision. 

• Before using any fire- 
works, read and follow all 
warnings and directions oh 
the label. 

• Only light fireworks 
outside in an open area, and 
away from any flammable 
materials. . 

• Keep a bucket of water 
nearby for emergencies. 

• Do not try to relight 
or handle undetonated fire- 
works. Soak them with wa- 
ter and throw them away. • 

Health Department Ex- 
ecutive Director Dale 
Galassie offers the follow- 
ing altenative to home fire- 



••••*•••••*•••••••••••**•••••• 

Happy 217th USA 



PUBUC NOTICE 

GRANT TOWNSHIP 
• Notice fs hereby given that seated proposals will be 
received at the office of The Grand Tovmship Clerk at 
411 Washington Street, Ingleside. IL 60041 until 7:00 
o'clock, p.m., on July 6, 1993 for furnishing of the follow- 
ing metenal: 

BITUMINOUS MIX, 4.550 TONS 

PRIME. 4,425 GALS. 
SAND, 43 TONS. 
Proposals shall be made on forms furnished by the 
Township Highway Commissioner and shall be 
addressed !n a sealed envelope to: Jack Kiesgen, Grant 
Township Highway Commissioner, 41 1 Washington 
Street, Ingleside, IL 60041 and shall be marked 'Material 
Proposal-Letting of Grant Township". Further information 
regarding the letting may be obtained by contacting the 
Commissioner at708-546-7623. The Township in accor- 
dance with the laws of the Stale of Illinois hereby notifies 
all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that the contract 
entered into pursuant to this advertisement will be 
awarded to the lowest responsible bidder without dis- 
crimination on the ground of race, color or national ori- 



PUBUC NOTICE 

NCmCEFORBID • 
The Fox Lake Grade School District 114 will receive 

sealed bids for carpeting in selected areas of Forest 

School, tjoUJs School and Stanton School. 

Bids will be accepted until Monday, July 19, 1993 at 

the administrative office, 17 N. Forest Ave., Fox Lake, IL 

60020, (708) 587-8275 until 1:00 P.M. and opened at 

1 :15 P.M. at tiie administrative office on that same date. 
The Board of Education reserves the right to reject 

any and alt bids or to accept tiie bid which best serves 

the interest of the District. 

Linda Usrey. Secretary 

Board of Education 

Fox Lake Grade School 0793A-808-Gen 

District 114 July 2, 1993 



gin. 



!day, July 2. 1993 



By Order Of Jack Kiesgen 

Grant Township 

Highway Commissioner 

0693D-796-GEN 

June 25, 1993 

July 2, 1993 



PUBUC NOTICE 

NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

Official notice Is hereby given that sealed bids for 
alteration to existing office facility in Viking Park, indud- 
ing window replacement, roof & siding repairs, and interi- 
or alterations will be received by the Gurnee Park 
District, at the District offices, 4374 Grand Avenue, 
Gumee, IL 6003 J, on the 20lh day of July. 1993 at 1 :00 
p.m. 

Plans and specifications, and other contract docu- 
ments may be examined at the offices of Bleck and 
Bieck Architects, 1321 Glen.Rock Avenue, Waukegan, IL 
600B5. Phone: (708) 244-2727. Fax: (708) 244-4489. 

A $50 fee will be required for each set of documents. 
Fee is refundable with bid or return of documents in 
usable condition within 1 5 days after bid is awarded. 

The Board of Park Commissioners reserves the right 
to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities. 
Christine Thompson 0793A-815-Gen 

Board PreskJent July 2, 1993 



works: "Why not lake ui a County. Many communi- 

professional fireworks ties, as well as the Great 

show," he said. "We are America amusement park, 

very lucky here in Lake have beautiful fireworks 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 
1993 IWANHOLE AND HYDRANT REHABIUTATION 
VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE 
Project No. 9351 11 
- BIDS DUE: 1 1:00 a.m., CDT, Thursday, July 15, 1993 
OWNER: Village of Round Lake 
442 North Cedar Lake Roewi 
Round Lake, Illinois 60073 
(708)546-5400 
BID OPENING: 

Sealed bids will be received by OWNER until 11:00 
a.m. Central Daylight time on Thursday, July 15, 1993, at 
' the address indicated above. Bids submitted after this 
time will not be accepted. Bkfs will be opened and pub- 
licfy read ak>ud inrimediately after specified dosing time. 
Interested parties are invited to attend. 
DESCRIPTION OF WORK:- ■;: 

Replacement of approximately 10 sanitary sewer 
manholes, rehabilitation of approximately 40 sanitary 
sewer manholes, and replacement of approximately 10 
fire hydrants, includng restoration. 
■ BASIS OF BIDS REQUIRED: 

Bids shall tw on a unit price t>asts. 
PROJECT SCHEDULE: 

Project is to be completed within 60 calendar days 
from the I'ate of written Notice To Proceed. 
EXAMINATION OF DOCUMENTS: 

Bidding documents may be examined at the following 
locations: 

Gmef, Anhalt, Schloemer& Associates, Inc. 
345 N. gsth Street 
Milwaukee, Wl 53226 

Graef, Anhait, Schloemer& Associates, Inc. 
8501 West Higgpns Road, Suite 2B0 
Chicago, IL 60631 
Village of Round Lake 
442 North Cedar Lake Road 
Round Lake; I L 60073 
F.W. Dodge Company 
230 West Monroe, 12th Roor 
Chicago, IL 60606 
PROCUREMENT OF. DOCUMENTS: . 

Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained at 
the Milwaukee and Chicago offices of Graef, Anhalt, 
Schloemer & Associates, Inc. 

A deposit of $25.00 will be required for each set of 
Bidding Documents. Mail requests for Bidding 
Documents shall be accompanied by a separate check 
in the amount of $5.00 to cover the costs of postage and 
handling. Deposits for Bidding Documents will be refund- 
ed only to those Bidders who submit a proposal and wtio 
return the Biddir>g Documents within ten days of ti)e Bid 
Opening Date. Monies for postage and handling is not 
refundable. 
BID SECURITY: 

All bids shall be accompanied ^y Bid Security made 
payable to the Owner in an amount of five per cent of tf>e 
Bidder's maximum Bid price and in the form of a Bid 
Bond, certified check, or cashiers check. 
PUBUC CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS: 

Bidder will be required to submit a full and complete 
statement of financial ability, equipment, experience in 
the wori< prescribed in the documents and other items 
required for the protection and welfare of the public. 
Bidder's Qualification Statement is bound into the 
Bidding Documents w^*h the Bid. 

Procurement of the work and award of the contract 
will be in accordance with the provision of Illinois 
Statutes. 

Biddera shall comply with prevailing wage rates, hours 
of labor and houriy basic pay rates for each trade or 
occupation established in accordance with Illinois 
. Statutes Ch. 48, par. 395-1 eL seq. for this work. 
FEDERAL FUNDING REQUIREMENTS: 

A portion of this project is funded by Community 
Development Block Grant Funds with the remainder 
being Village services and funds serving as leveraging. 
As this construction project is to be federally funded, all 
labor standards and equal opportunity regulations will be 
enforced. 

The Contractor for tfiis project will be required to com- 
ply, to tiie greatest extent feasible, with all Section 3 reg- 
ulations pertaining to provision of opportunities for train- 
ing and employment to lower income residents of the 
project area and to the provision that contracts for work 
in connection with the project be awarded to business 
concerns located in, or owned in substantial part by, per- 
sons residing in the area of tiie project 
RIGHT TO REJECT BIDS: 

Owner reserves the right to reject any and al) Bids, to 
waive any and all infomialities not involving price, time or 
changes In the Wori<, and ttie right to disregard all non- 
confonning, nonresponsive, unbalanced or conditional 
Bids. 
CONTRACT SECURITY: 

Bidder awarded a contract for the work shall be 
required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment 
Bond in the full amount of the contract price. 
CONTRACT AWARD: 

Owner re senses the right to pos^one the award of the 
Contract for a period not exceeding 60 days from the 
date of bid opening. Bids shall remain fimn for tiiat period 
of time. 

Published by authority of VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE, ILLINOIS 

Lillian Frost 

Village Cterk 

June 28, 1993 0793A-812-Gen 

July 2, 1993 






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Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 29 



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staying on road to safety while tra 



Students at Grlnnell 
College have compiled a 
booklet of advice for mo- 
torists wiio may become 
stranded on the highway. 
The pamphlet also con- 
tains a state-by-sate com- 



prehensive list of emer 
gency telephone num- 
bers. 
Before you leave 

• Plan travel routes to 
avoid unsafe or unfamiliar 
area. 



Fill your tank with 
gas. 

• Check all fluids. 

• Test air pressure in 
the tires. 

• Tell someone your 
route and estimated time 



Putyourcar 
and home under 

one roof. 



Q G^-* fc If yQ^j pm \yQ^ yQur homc and car insurance with me and 

^\^ you're an excellent driver, you could get a discount of up to 20 

percent on a large portion of your car insurance. To see how 

rS;'b;°s^aYou're in good hands. 

^ <S Colleen M. Murphy /HlStatfi 
^' ^ 5250 Grand Ave. 
Gumee, IL 60031 
(708) .249-9700 

SubjeatokKiiivilUWlitYifidquiilfi»UoM.0199JAlbuieInwnj>ceComp»ny.Notihbn)Qk.llU^ 




of arrival. 

• Keep in your car a 
blanket, a "Send Help" 
sign/ a spare tire and jack, 
basic tools such as a 
screwdriver and wrench, a 
flashlight, quart of oil, five 
dollars and a pen and pa- 
per. 

When you're en route 

• Pay attention to your 
surroundings. Look of 
landmarks and highway 
mile markers, 

• Lock you car at all 
times. 

• Drive to a public 
place if you're bumped 
from beiiind and don't 
■feel safe stopping. 

• Don't get out of your 
car without looking for 
danger first 

• Don't pick up hitch- 
hikers or ride with anyone 
you don't know. 

If your car breaks down 

• Park as far of the trav- 
eled portion of the high- 
way as possible. 

• Turn on the four-way 
emergency flashers. 

• Open the hood. 

• Tie a light-colored 
cloth to the antenna or 
traffic-side door handle. 

• Place a "Send Help" 




sign in your window. 

• Try to stay with your 
vehicle until a police offi- 
cer arrives. 

• If anyone stops to 
help, stay in the car, crack 
open the window and ask 
him or her to get the po- 
lice. 

• If you do leave the 
vehicle, leave a note with 
your name, the date and 
time you left, the direction 

"^ you're going, what you're 
wearing, a description 



and license number of 
any vehicle you get in and 
the driver's name. 

Grinnell students 
formed the group Fearless 
to promote highway safety 
following the roadside 
slaying of a fellow student. 
To obtain a copy of the 
pamplilet, send a self-ad- 
dressed, stamped enve.- 
lope to: Highway Safety 
Booklet, Grinnell College, 
1119ParkSt., P.O. Box 
805, Grinnell, Iowa 50112- 
0810. 



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lday.July2, 1993 




Lakeland Newspapers' COUNTY NEWS 




owes quente to VOICE'S 




by RHONDA VINZANT 
Lakeland Newspapers 

When Ron Weeks moved to Lake 
County from Indianapolis a liltle more 
than a year ago, he was not expecting to 
lake on the federal govemmerit or to be- 
come the spokesman for the county in a 
fight to save more than $450 million in 
economic impact 

Weeks moved to the area to expsmd his 
central insurance office and make the 
Chicagoland area his headquarters. 

A civic-minded man, Weeks, affiliated 
with the. Lake County Chapter of the 
Navy League of the United States and 
that's where, he began to^merge as a 
spokesman for the county. 

When long-time country resident and 
Navy League member, Jim Holham, heard 
rumblings that top Navy brass was plan- 
ning to recommend the Naval Training 



Center at Great Lakes.for closure he ap- 
proached Weeks about forming a citizens 
group to work to keep the base open. 

Weeks had the right resume, He held a 
similar role with the Indianapolis based 
Partners in Progress during the Base 
Realignment and Closure Hearings in 
199L - 

"I told Jim I'd look at the facts," said 
Weeks. "What we had here at Great Lakes ' 
was a base with a military reason to stay 
open but a community that was not in- 
volved and that was very apathetic about 
its closing," he noted. "In Indianapolis 
we had a community that loved Fort 
Benjamin Harrison and its people but a 
fort that from a military standpoint should 
have been closed in a downsizing effort 
and that is what happened." 

Weeks and Hotham formed VOICE in 
mid-December and went to work. Their 
joint efforts were all volunteer woric. 



"The first thing wc had to do was to 
gain the support and attention of the polit- 
ical establishment," said Weeks. "Namely 
and importantly we needed the support of 
the county board. Without a staff and fi- 
nancial support we would not be able to 
pull it off." 

Weeks said gaining the support of the 

local.political establishment and business 

leaders was tougher than he might have 

.anticipated. ' : 

"There was so much apathy," Weeks 
said. "I don't know if iit is "because the 
base has been around since 1911 and 
they've heard this before or it is because 
ihey really didn't understand that the base 
could be closed, but it was tough convinc- 
ing people throughout the county that this 
could happen." 

"We had to get a lot of people to face 
facts," Weeks said. "We brought the is- 
sues forward and that became the catalyst 



for raising funds." 

Once Weeks had the opportunity to 
explain the facts to the county board, he 
won the complete support of Chaim^an 
Bob Depke. "We spoke to all sides on 
this issue," said Weeks. "But if Depke 
hadn't jumped on this thing, we would be 
closed. He grabbed the issue, understood 
the issue and ran with the balL He gave 
us credibility." 

Once the ball was rolling, VOICE put 
together a team of experts that were effec- 
tive and credible in presenting Naval 
Training Center Great Lakes' case to the 
BRAC commission and ultimately win- 
ning approvaL 

"Anyone who watches the hearings 
could see that closing Great Lakes was a 
real possibility," Weeks said. "We had to 
show that the community wanted to retain 
the base." ' - 




(Continued from page 29) 

40-mile radius around Great Lakes. 
"Catchment area" clients include^ 30,000 
active duty military from all branches of 
service, 21,740 family members of active 
duty, 11,000 retired members, 10,370 
family members of retired members, and 
1,773 family members of deceased mili- 
tary members. 

After seeing and listening to an almost 
numbing scries of ever-changing figures 
about the two bases - including their hos- 
pitals - commissioners acceded that the 
entire financial issue was "a wash." 
Eventually, they voted to close NTC 
Orlando because "that was the Navy*s 
recommendation." The decision is ex- 
pected to bring 8-9,000 new jobs to NTC 
Great Lakes. Other testimony heard in- 
cluded members', personal impressions 
about the two areas of the country, the 
wisdom of terminating the Navy*s 82- 
year presence in tlie Midwest, and which 
NTC lends itself to a "pleasant" environ- 
ment for training young Navy recruits. 

In a media briefing after llie commis- 
sion finished work for the evening. 
Commission Chairman James Courier 
said that "until 10 minutes before I voted, 
I wasn*t sure which way I would go. 

"Had the. Navy chosen Orlando, I 
would have chosen Orlando myself. But 
tliey didn't," he said. During a visit to 



Great Lakes on May 13, Courteraf finned 
that when the conunissioners finished 
, their work, only one Naval Training 
Center would be left "We feel confident 
we will make the best decision, and that 
we will have one training center and not 
thiee._" 

The commission's choice of Great 
Lakes is not the end of the story. Their 
recommendations were sent to President 
Clinton earlier this week, and the 
President has until July 15 to either ap- 
prove or disapprove the entire report, 
"This is only a recommendation," said 
NTC Great Lakes Special Assistant for 
Public Affairs Lt. Cmdr. Ken Cronk. 
"The process won't be complete until 
later this year, and it's inappropriate for 
the Navy to make any comment on the 
commission's decision, because it could 
still be changed." / 

Nonetheless, Sen. Paul Simon (D.-IU.) 
said that "We've now cleared what is 
likely to be the last hurdle in this pro- 
cess." 

If approved, the President forwards 
the list to Congress, which will have until 
Aug. 31 to enact a joint resolution to dis- 
approve all of the recommendations, or 
.they will automatically become law. Most 
of the people involved in the base closure 
procedure believe that the President and 
Congress will approve the panel's voles 



completely, as has-been done in all previ- 
ous base closure proceedings. 

In addition to these normal proceed- 
ings, a report in the Orlando Sentinel said 
that McCoIlum and Orlando Mayor 
Glenda Hood are considering the possi- 
bility of filing a lawsuit to block the clo- 
sure of their NTC. Hood said that she 



would support a siiit if the base.has. a 
strong case. Orlando supporters asked for 
a re-hearing Sunday before the commis- 
sion, and were denied it "The briefing we 
got was objective," Courier said. 

— Brown is editor of the Great Lakes 
Bulletin, a civilian enterprise newspaper, 
serving the Navy community. 



A sa^ story to teH 



The word "desperate" is used too of- 
ten, but sadly, it deiscribes our dog Riley. 
Riley is a neutered three year old lab/shep 
mix with a rich brown and gold brindle 
coat Riley has a super personality; this 
sturdy dog will practically stand on his 
head to grab attention. Riley adores peo- 




pie and is playful and energetic. The sad 
story? Riley has been at the shelter since 
November 19911 This is a' tragedy that 
should end soon. Is there someone, 
somewhere who has a home that needs a 
great dog like Riley? Riley still believes 
that life is worth living. A home and a 
family are what he needs, desperately. 
Available at Cage 73. 

Cash $SS donation includes free 
spay/neuter, collar, follow-up care, first 
shots and more. 

Orphans of the Storm is located at 
2200 Riverwoods Rd. in Deerfield. Hours 
are 11 ajn. to 5 pjn., seven days a week. 
Call 945-0235. 

Sammy the 10 year old Beagle that 
ran in the June 3 edition was adopted, as 
well as Magic the lab/chow that ran in the 
May 15 edition. 




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Lakeland Newipap«r» 31 



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Peter Frelsem rides away from Church of 
the Intercession on the Nerl, near city of 
Vladimir. 









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Peter (on left), Tom 
and Tanya pose in 
Red Square in Moscow 
at end of tour. St. 
Basil's Cathedral Is In 
background. 



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Photos by 
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Cycling the 
tiolden Ring 



The overridtrig theme of Peter Freisem's,45. minute sUd presenta- .- 
tion "Cycling Russia's Golden Ririg[Vcleariycenteb on ffi 
al beauty found in 12 medieval Russian cities near Moscow, cities 
through which the Deerfield resident pedaledjoiyLgyo wedc; 525 mile „ 
bicycle trip in 1991. 

With his brother Tom and Russian-born sister-in-law Tanya, 
Freisem discovered frequently ostentatious, always strilcing expres- 
sions of faith in soaring, ornate, typically gold-domed cathedrals of 
the 17th and 18th century Russian Orthodox church. Especially when 
contrasted with the spacious, sometimes stark countryside, the effect 
was nothing less than breathtaking, he re- 
calls. 

But so too were the people, Freiseml 
says. Within them came another, sur-| 
prising, more memorable beauty. And if tiis| 
story focuses upon buildings, crafts-l 
manship, and history, it remains Imbued with respect for the 
resourceful, expressive, and proud Russians. 

"I knew of them what I'd read and heard on radiq and television," 
remembers Freisem, who now considers himself an enthusiast of all 
tilings Russian. 

"I expected worn, despondent, frustrated, perhaps angry men and 
women. But for all the hardsliip— and hardship is there, alright— they 
showed themselves a hardy, receptive people." 

That hardiness rekindles more in Freisem than faith in human 
nature. He was recovering from a badly broken leg— fractured in three 
places— when, in the spring of 1991, he lost his public administration 
job with the Village of Northbrook. At best only a casual bicyclist at the 
time, Freisem accepted his brother's invitation to accompany him and 
Tanya "as the right time for an adventure. " 

' By the time the trek began in August, Freisem could bike up to 200 
miles in a week. 

But sufficieiit physical endurance would be less a concern than the 
need for patience. With two experienced long-distance cyclists along- 



-.=?ss^^^/;. 



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BRYAN MASSEY 



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side; both acquainted with the Russian countryside and one fluent In the lan- 
guage, the predictable challenges — communication, food and accommoda- 
tionsi navigation and bad roads, for example— proved surmountable. 
Freisem, though, found a particular challenge in learning what his brother 
and sister-in-law already had learned: These were not moments through 

which to rush. „ „, 

"We stopped frequently to admire, to talk with passers-by," he recalls. I 

sooii understood what it meant to savor^the architecture, the scenery, the 

people. We were there to experience and learn, after all, not just to see," 

Several times a visitor to Europe— with iiis father as a teenager and during 
his years as a student In the 1980s at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, Freisem says the Russian visit was by far the most Indelible of ills 
trips overseas. A lot of the credit he shares with Tom andj[anya. Now Seatde, 
Wash., residents, they met in 
1989 as members of the Soviet- 
American team that rode 7,000 
miles across the then-Soviet 
Union. The younger Freisem 
followed up that trip with a 
3,000 mile journey in 1990 from 
Moscow to Berlin. 

"He and Tanya knew I could 
not come away- untouched," 
Freisem says. ''And they were 
right. I still feel a closeness." 

The next local showing of 
"Cycling Russia's Golden Ring" 
is scheduled for Sept 28 at the 
Cook Memorial Library in 
Llbertyville. A showing also is 
scheduled for Sept. 29 at the 
Wauconda Township Library in 
Wauconda. For more informa- 
tion, write or call Peter Freisem, 
1354 Barclay I^ne, Deerfield, 111. 



32 Lakeland Nowsixtpers 




•'.July 2. 1993 



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ore classes begin 




The next session of "Explore!" a series of Saturday mini-courses for junior hlgii school 
students, will begin July 10 at the College of Lake County. The following four classes will 
be ofTered from 10:30 a.m to 12:30 p.m. on the Grayslake campus, 19351 W. Washington 
Street ^ . - , 

• "Positively Me" will help students develop positive thinking skills and take risks. 

• "Murder You Write," a mystery problem-solving class, will provide tips and ideas to 
fix a plot, name and determine characters, develop clues and solve a crime. 

• "Beginning Ceramics" will provide a hands-on introduction to the techniques of this 
decorative artwork. ; . 

• "Introduction to Photography Part I" will highlight the applications of artistic com- 
position and balance to create professional-looking photos. The session will include a 
slide, presentation and a project which will be due at the next class Aug. 7. Students must 
bring a 35 nmi camera to class. 

Ihe cost is $10 per class. For Jcfoimation, call Lucy Baltsen at 223-3616. 

Children's Art Fair at Guneo 

The Children's Art Fair at the Cuneo Museum will offers hands-on art activities for 
kids of all ages, July II from 11 a..m: to 5 p.m; 

From face painting to bubble making, kids can try wood sculpture, weaving or origa- 
mi. Over 15 diiferent art stations to get your hands into. 

Artist will teach demonstrations during the fair and a performing arts program will 
feature Jim Gill's concert of music and drama play. 

Grounds fees are $2 for children and $4 for adults. Admission covers all performances 
and art materials. The fair will be held rain or shine. 

Cuneo Museum and Gardens are located at 1350 North Milwaukee Ave., Vernon Hills. 
For more information call 362-3042. 

Statue of Liberty Crowns, noisemakers and banners 

FamlUes can make their own Statue of Liberty crowns to wear for Fourth of July cele- 
brations, make, noisemakers to take to the parades and create baimers and flags for the 
• holiday festivities between how and July 3 at Teacher Place and Parent Resources. ; 

The noifprofit educational resource center supports families learning together In aca- 
demic and lightiiearted ways. The center is located at 533 Milwaukee Ave,, Burlington, 
Wis. and may be used by anyone. Children must be with an adult. 



A small admission charge offers many opportunities for projects, puzzle solving, brows- 
ing, game playing, planning, research and special monthly offerings. . The noisemaker 
and small banner are free to make with admission and the materials for the Statue of 
Liberty crown are $2. Drop-in hours are Tuesday and Wednesday from noon imtil 7 p.m., 
Thursday from 5 until 8 p.m and Saturdays from 10 am. to 4 p.m Call (414) 763-3946 or 
728-5623 for more Information. . ^. 

Tumble into summer at Richmond Memorial Hall 

There are still openings for the one -week summer programs for Wds at Richmond's 
Memorial Hall, 10308 Main Street, sponsored by Creative Arts Center of Nlppersink. ' 

Tumbling.Camp is offered in three sessions: preschool, begirmers and intermediate. 
The camp offers children an opportunity to increase coordination and leam new skills in 
a relaxed, supportive environment For more information call (815) 678-2510; 

Sunmiertime nature fun for youth in forest preserves 

Natuixdist-guided programs for chil(fren of aJl ages are available in the Lake County 
Forest Preserve tins stimm 

Naturalist," and "NatiireArtW spend time outdoors dis- 

covering and leainin]|^hib&tiiati^ 

•Young Natuj^dists^jl^fprci^^^ ages 7-10 who want to build science skills. Some of 
nature's secrets are, flimge^^ identify animal tracks and how snakes sUtii- 

er. Tills group meete^aj|RyeKon3yQpds,heau'Peeffi^ 10-11:30 a.nL on July 12, 13, 

IS and 16. The feeis$ffirpirpersoh ( 

Reservations and advanced payment are required for all programs. A program 
brochure and registration form Is available by calling 948-7750, Space is limited in all 
programs. 



...-^' 




Mir^f 



This summer the Sundance Saloon will hold "Bahamas or Blast" Every Tuesday 
andWednesday, during- July and August, the Sundance will send a happy customer 
to Freeport, Grand Bahama. 

July 6 through July 11, at Sundance, isHodeo Week. Family Day is July 11th- It will 
feture a visit from the Bud girls and US99's Cat Man and the Country Roads Band 
and recording artist Larl White. - j 

This Friday and Saturday, the Sundance will feature Wild Orchid. The Sundance 
is located at Routes 176 and 83 in Mundeleln. Call 949-0858. 

Mundelein" Days runs July 1 through July 5. Featured acts are: July 2, 5 p.m., REX, 
jazz fusion; 8 p.m., Steve Richards; July 3, 2 p.m., One Night Stand, '40s to '80s; 8 
p.m., Brass Bullet, pop; Jiily 4, 7:30 p.m., Southern Strut, country; July 5, 4 p.m., 
Sensational Salami Brothers, '50s and '60s; 7 p.m., British Import, Beatles 
tribute.— by CLAUDIA M. LENART 



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Lakeland Newtpapors 33 



jB— ^HWJMIWWWW * ' * ' " I ' '"" ! '" ." 





Watercolor exhibit 

Works by the Lakes Region Water- 
color Guild will be presented through 
July 22 at the David Adler Cultural 
Center, 1700 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Libertyvllle. The exhibit can be viewed 
Mondays through Saturdays. Call the 
Adler Center at 367-0707 for gallery 
hours and further Information. 

Recycled art sale 

The Suburban Fine Arts Center, 777 
Central Ave., Highland Park is holding 
its Fifth Annual Recycled Art Sale from July 2 
through 31. Sale hours are 9 a.m^to 4 p.m. 
Monday through Saturday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
on Sunday, July 4. On Friday, July 2, a mem- 
bers', champagne preview and silent auction 
will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The SFAC Is . 
accepting donations of all kinds of original art- 
work or related items. Call 432-188B for more 
information. 

Tireworks in Sound' 

The Lake Forest Symphony will pre- 
sent the annual July fourth Concert- 
on-the-Green musical entitled 
"Fireworks in Sound." Shuttle buses 
are available. For Information and 
advanced tickets call the Lake Forest 
Symphony office at 295-2135. Adult 
lawn, SB; Child lawn (under 12 years), 
$4; Adult reserved chair seats, $12; 
Child reserved chair seats, 56; Adult 
reserved tabke seats, $14; Child 
reserved table seats, $7. Lawn tickets 
will be sold at the gate on the day of the perfor- 
mance for Adults, $10; Children, $5. The event 
will be presented on the grounds of the Deer 




Path School, 95 W. Deerpath In Lake Forest. 
Gates will open at 4 p.m. with the performance 
beginning at B p.m. 

Symphony orchestra 

The Lake Forest Symphony Orchestra will 
perform an outdoor concert on July 18, at 7 
p.m. at the Cuneo Museum and Gardens In 
Vernon Hills. "Bravo Broadway," vocalists will 
perform selections from "Oklahoma" and the 
"Phantorti of the Opera-" Lawn tickets are $7; 
reserved seats, including a boxed supper and 
preferred parking, are $30. To reserve tickets or 
for more information, call 295-2135. 

CSO residency at Ravinia 

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra's 58th 
consecutive season at Ravinia will be per- 
formed now through Aug. 15. Featured soloists 
during the Chicago Symphony's residency 
include Misha DIchter in his 25th appearance 
at the Festival, Andre Watts, Yo-Yo.Ma, Lynn 
Harreil and Kathleen Battle. For further infor- 
maUon call (312JR-A-V-I-N-I-A (728-4642). 

Turn about 

All singles are invited to the 
Combined Club Slnglesj^Tiirn About 
Dance" at 8 p.m. on Saturday, July 10, 
at the Marrlot Oak BrookHotel, 1401 
W. 22nd St., Oak Brook. The women 
ask the men to dance. Music will be 
provided by Music in Motion. The 
event is co-sponsored by Northwest 
Singles Assn., Young Suburban Singles, 
and Singles and Company. Admission 
will be $5. For more Information call 
209-2066. 

Red, white and blue 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance Club will be 



sponsoring "Red, White and Blue," dance with. 
Chuck Jaworskl calling squares and Ellssa 
Plschke quelng rounds on Friday, July 2. 
Dancing from 8;30 to 11 p.m. with a round 
dance workshop from 8 to 8:30 p.m. and a plus 
tip at 11 p.m. The dance will be held at First 
United Methodist Church, 128 N. Utlca SL, 
Waukegan. Call 662-6546 for further Informa- 
tion. 

Square dance 

The McHenry Bachelors 'N' Bachelorettes . 
Square Dance Club Invites all single square 
dancers and couples to the July 2 "Ice Cream 
Social" dance to be held at the Johnsburg 
Community Club, 2315 W. Clfurch St., 
Johnsburg. Round dancing begins at 8 p.m. 
with cures George and Joyce Kammercr; square 
dancing from 8-30 to 11 p.m. to caller Jerry Hill. 
No partner necessary. For Information call 
(815)344-2747 or 885-6178, 




*GodspeU' 



Shady Lane Playhouse in Marengo 
(home to a 50 year tradition of fine the- 
atrical entertainment) presents 
Godspell. The production will run July. 

j 9 through Sept 12. Performances will 

I be Friday and Saturday and Sunday. 

J Matinees are also scheduled for 
Wednesday afternoons at 2 p.m. on' 
July 14, Aug. 4 and 18 and Sept. 8. 
"Godspell" is a musical based on the 
Gospel according to St. Matthew. 

JTickets are $10 and $15. For more 
information or reservations, call the RVC box 



office (815)654-4296 Monday through Friday 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or the Shady Lake 
Playhouse at (815)568-3270. 

'HotMikadp' 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre presents "Hot 
Mikado," a sizzling celebration of Gilbert & 
Sullivan's operetta "The Mikado." It Is a nJxed- 
up tale of mistaken identities and hilarious 
improbabilities. The play runs through Aug. 22. 
Performance times are: Wednesday 2 and 8 
p.m.; Thursday 8 p.m.; Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 
5:30 and 9 p.m.; and Sunday 2:30 and 7 p.m. 
Ticket prices are $31 for adults, $26 for senior 
citizens, students and active military (all per- 
formances except Thursday and Saturday). 
Dinner packages are available for all perfor- 
mances.. Call 634-0200 for further information 
and reservations. 

Theater workshop 

The Kirk Players Is sponsoring a free, nine- 
week theater workshop for teens (age 13 and 
up) and adults. Classes meet each Monday 
evening, starting June 21, from 8 to 10 p.m. In 
the Mundelcin High School auditorium. No 
registration Is required. For more information 
contact John Lynn at 566-6594. 

Summer Theatre 

Eugene lonesco's "Rhinoceros," the 
College of Lake County's summer theatre, will 
open at 8 p.m. July 9 In the Building 5 theatre at 
CLC's Gtayslake campus, 19351 W. Washington 
SL The play will be repeated July 10, 16 and 17. 
Ticket s are $7 general admission and $5 for 
CLC students and alumni. For ticket informa- 
tion call 223-6601, ext 2300. 






Muscle car/auto parts swap meet 

Skip's Collectible and Muscle Car Auto Parts Swap Meet will be held on July 4, 8 a.m. to 4 
p.m. at Lake County Fairground in Grayslake (Rte. 45 and Rte. 12C). This event Is sponsored 
by Skip's Fiesta' Drive-In. General admission Is $4, swap spaces $15, sale cars $12. For more 
Information, call 682-8792. 

History of art in newspapers 

The history of the use of art In newspapers is explored In a program and exhibit at the Lake 
County Forest Preserve's Lake County Museum on Rte. 176 near Wauconda. The exhibit, 
lArtilch runs through July 5, explores the Impact of illustrations, photographs, cartoons arid 
maps on the content and appearance of newspapers. Gallery hours are 11 a.ra to 4:30 p.m. 
Monday through Saturday, and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $1.50 for adults and 50 
cents for students. Reservations for the program are required and can be made by calling 

526-7878. 

(Continued on page 35) 



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HEEL PAIN 

A heel spur is a boney growth on the underside of the heel 
bone. This growth appears in response to an abnormal pull from 
the ngament that runs through the arch. Other factors that indicate 
spurs are long temn standing on hand surfaces. A Bursitis usually 
co-exists with a spur and is what causes the pain. Treatment 
consists of custom made arch supports, called orthotics that, 
relieve the tension on the ligament and pads the heel area. 
Surgery is rarely indicated. 

If you have the abovt) •^ptoma or any other foot discomfort, you 
may conlad Dr. Winter* for a HO COST CONSULTATION to tee If 
- there may be an answer to your fool pain. 



770 Barron Blvd. (81 83}^ 
Grayslahe 



223-4000 



10 Phillip Rd. 11121 
Vernon Kills . 



Summer sheen glistens on shades of corals, flashes of cobalt blues, 
oceanic teals, and cranberries bursting 
with freshness. Exotic colofs that tempt and 
Ironscend as East meets V\/est In on exciting 
LJi new look, Escape to the tranquility of 
our 'Jade Garden' today. 
See your Merle Nofman 
Beauty Advisor for 
o FREE summer 
mokeover In these 
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Bicycle adventure 
of a lifetime 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

Interested in a 38-niilc bicycle lour? How about we 
make this trip in Hawaii. Let's add one raorc feature 
particularly appealing to an tfging babyboomer like 
myself. It's all do wniiill! 

This little trip is known as Cruiser Bob's Haleakala 
Downhill, and begins at the summit of tlic Haleakala 
crater at 10,023 ft, on the island of Maui and ends at the 
beach in Paia at sea level. It is an adventure that you Ayill 
remember for a lifetime. 

Bob offers two departures. The one I would recommend 
is the sunrise trip. Just seeing the sunrise from the summit 
of Haleakala is wortlv Uic trip, and tlmt's just . the 
beginning. You arc picked up from your hotel at 3 a.m. 
.(Think of it as 8 a.m. GcnU-al Standard Tin>c) You're 
driven lo the crater's summit on the same road you will 
bicycle down so you will become familiar willi tlie 
roadway and terrain. You get brcidcfast on the summit and 
watch Uie sunrise. 

You then begin the 38-milc downhill adventure. You 
will experience all of Maui's beauty, from lunar-like 
volcanic terrain, tropical jungles and waterfalls to white 
sand beaches. - 

You arc accompanied by two professionally trained 
escorts, a tour cruise leader and escort van driver. The tour 
leader is in constant radio communication with tlic van. 
You will be traveling at about 15 miles per hour and will 
be allowed plenty of stops for picture taking and 
refreshments. A picnic lunch is also included. 

You will be riding a specially designed bicycle with 
brakes that could slop a Sherman tank. The ride doesn't 
take much physical effort, yet it is still not for someone 
who has not been on a bike before. While tliere is no age 
requirement, you must be over 5 feet tall and not pregnant. 
Obviously anyone with a medical condition impairing 
their ability at high elevations should not take the trip. 

Temperatures can be 35 lo 40 degrees at Ihe summit, so.. _ 
warm clothing is recommended, as arc glasses and 
closed- toe rubber soled shoes. 

The total trip takes about 8 hours. While the '95 price 
tag may seem a little high, it's an adventure you will be 
telling your grandchildren about. 



mERLE nORfTlRn 

COSMETIC STUDIOS 

406 Lake Street, Antioch, iL 
Phone 395-1116 



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0attmsnuf matm ma 



2234 E. Grand Undenhurst, III. 
24 Hr. Recorded Bqrgains - 356-2000 

(708) 336-3010 



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34 Lakokind Newipaport 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



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1993 



Dining and Ehtertainmerit 



Lakelife 



Lakeland 




(Continued from page~3r4) 

Volo Bog's kids ecology series^ 

Volo Bog, 2B478 W. Brandenburg m., Ingleslde, has designed an ecology series every Wednesday 
from 10 a.m. to noon, or 1 to 3 p.m. for kids(minimum age five) and their families. Phone (B15)344- 
1294 to register for the following classes: July 7, Nature Discovery; observation skills; July 14, Animal 
Homes, habltat-our needs are the same; July 21, Pond Life, a close look at a watery community; July 
28,' Volo Bog's Web 'O Life, Interdependence of life Is discovered In a strange community. 

Hooved Animal Humane Society 

The Hooved Animal Humane Society presents Carolyn Resnlck, nationally renowned for her 
specialty in liberty training, A clinic wilt be conducted at the HAHS Rehabilitation Center, 10804 

Stage Two names Mooney artistic 

Timothy Mooney will be taking the Artistic Director post, succeeding Stage Two's 
founder and long-time Artistic Director, Bryan W. Simon. Stage Two is committed to 
innovative idea-oriented theatre specializing in new work. 

Most recently, Mooney directed all four one-acts in the widely-praised Ray Bradbury 
Festival at Stage Two. Simultaneously, he worked m Chicago, staging another one-act 
play for the 1993 Bailiwick Theatre Directo r's Festival. Mooney was one of five 
"best-directors'* at the 48-play festival, honored 
for his work on Secret Obscenities by Marco 
Antonio de la Parra. He is also recipient of a 
playwrlting grant from the Chicago 
Department of Cultural Affairs. 

Mooney's professional background includes 
stints with the Seattle Repertory theatre, the 
Milwaukee Repertory Theatre and the Alabama 
Shakespeare Festival. He was Literary Manager 
and Resident Director with the Playwrights' 
Center in Chicago and was winner of a Drama 
League of New York director's apprenticeship. 
Mooney also spent two years teaching theatre 
at Northern llluiols University. 

In addition, he foimded and currendy edits 
The Script Review, a national newsletter for 
playwrights and producers. New plays in man- 
uscript form are reviewed for theatres Interest- 
ed in producing new works. "Over the years," 
Mooney states, "I have developed a reserve of 
exciting new plays that nobody else knows Timothy Mooney 
about The opportunity to premiere them in a theatre that is already dedicated to Innova- 
tive support of new works is an incredible opportimlty." 

A native of Arlington Heights, Mooney received his bachelor's degree in Acting and 
Directing from Southern Illinois University at Carbohdale and his Master of Fine Arts 
degree in Directing at the University of Nebraska-Lincohi. He wUl be moving to Lake 
County in July from his cturrent home in Chicago. 




McConnell Rd., Woodstoci^on July 9; 10, U, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will feature her easy-to-apply'prin- 
cipals of horsemanship and equine communication. The fee Is $30 a day per person, or $450 for a 
three day clinic with the horse. Problem horses are welcome. For information and reservations call 
(815)337-5563. . 

Island Lake Festival 

The Island Lake Area Chamber of Commerce 1993 Island Lake Festival Commlttee"will be spon- 
soring a festival at Water Tower Park, Rle. 176 in Island Lake. The festival will begin on Friday, luly 

16 with a "Movie Under the Stars" where a new movie release will be shown. Festival activities 
include a "parade, games, food and beverage vendors- The festival will be from noon until 11 p.m. 
Saturday, July 17 and from noon to B p.m.on Sunday, July 18. Fireworks vrill be held at dusk on July 

17 with viewing from Water Tower Park . For additional informaUon, call Lou Sharp at 526-1343 or 
MaretCanfield at 526-8008. 

Fox Lake Saleabration 

Fox Lake Saleabration will be held Friday, July 23, noon to 8 p.m. and Saturday, luly 24, 11 a,m. 
to 6 p.m. and Siinday, luly 25, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.* The events wiii be held in the commuter paridng lot 
off of Rte. 12 and Grand Ave., Fox Lake. There will bean auto and boat show, sidewalk sale, arts and 
crafts fair, food, collector car show, and a Venetican Night boat parade on Saturday, luly 24, 8 p.m. 
Prizes for the best decorated boats. Signup at any FoxLake Marine. All events are free, 

*ChildrenFirst* golf invitational 

On luly 30, Central Baptist Children's Home, 215 N. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, will sponsor the 
"Children First" Golf Invitational at Midlane Country Club, 14565 Yorkhouse Rd., Wadsworth, begin- 
ning at noon shot-gun start The day of golf for S125 includes: Midlane Express lunch, green fee and 
cart, IB hole best bail scramble, locker room and towel, driving range warmup, 5:30 p.m. refresh- 
ments and hors d'oeurves and. 6:30 p.m. dinner followed by magician/entertainer Will TremonL 
Tickets for the dinner are avUable for $50 each, call 356-2391. 



"«■ * 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii: 



Dear Area Residents & Friends: 

The Katris Brothers, proud owners of the Las Vegas 
Restaurant in Antioch, have added the former Landmark 
Restaurant & Banquet Hall to their dining facilities. After 
being closed for remodeling, the beautiful new facility will 
reopen soon. . 

Watch for further details and our new name. Please contin- 
ue to mail in your suggestions for our new name. 

Thank you for your continued support & patronage. We 
look forward to many more years of serving you at Las Vegas 
and the new facility. 

The Katris Brothers 

P.S. For more information, call 395-6363 & ask for John or Chris 



.nllllllllliiliiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiBlillr. 



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Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Nowspap«fi 35 



Dining and Entertainment 



%' 



'^ f' 




elife 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 





Marriott's Uncolnshlro Thaatre presents "Hot Mikado.' Reclining. Stephanie L. Burton, first 
row: Harrison McEldowney, Nicole Roberts, LaTonyo Holmes. Jackie J. Patterson, Robin 
Baxter. Deldre Dolan. Ron J. Hutctifns. Second row: Jonathan Todd Horenstein, Curt Dale 
Clark. Ross Lehman, Felicia P. Fields, Stephen R. Buntrock, Stanley White, Susan Monlz. 
Keith Jackson, Rob Rahn, Robert N. DeWltt. 

Marriott swizzles with 'Mikado' 



The pre-WW II op- 
erettas written by Gilbert 
and Sullivan are classics, 
but tlieir gauzy plots seem 
really dated in this day of 
the heavy musical. So it 
seems to those of us who 



comedian on a stage filled 
with African-Americans, 
Latinos and other ethnic 
groups. 

'Hie male chorus adopts 
a tough stance befitting the 
zoot suits they are wearing. 



Ko-Ko, and Stephen 
Btmtrock is an able Nanki- 
Poo vocally and dramati- 
cally. 



The real scene-stealer is 
gospel singer Felicia Fields 
ac Katisha if we are to 

"Stl^^Lt^^^^ ^::'Lln!f^^^:^^, i-^S^ by *« cheenng press 

night audience. 



school and college produc 
tions of these rather stilted 
pieces of harmonious fluff. 
Maniott Lincolnshire's 
new version of a somewhat 
updated G&S masterpiece, 
"The Hot Mikado" utilizes 
its usual top-notch talent 
and replaces the stilted 
tunes with some of the 
swinglngest boogie-woogie 
we've been privileged to 
hear in a long while. 

Kudos go to the real 
stars of the show, musical 
director Bob Bowman and 
his sizzling musicians. 

Director/choreographer 
David Bell can put another 
notch in Ills award- wiiming 
belt for keeping Marriott's 
stage jumping with jive, 
gospel and the kind of 
dancing we haven't seen 
the likes of since it re- 
verberated vrtth the scores 
of "Grease," "West Side 
Story" and "Black Patent 
^\ Leather Shoes." 

The S'mores plot has a 
wandering musician 
named NanJci-Poo nmning 
from ills father, the Mikado, 
because he has been sen- 
tenced to death for break- 
ing the flirting law. 

He meets the pert and 
dazzling Yum-Yum who is 
already taken by Ko-Ko, 
and the rest of the story 
hangs on the young couples 
efforts at getting together 
when suddenly Katisha, the 
older woman who wants 
Nanld-Poo shows up. 

The action is fast, the 
jokes worthy of the Z.A,Z. 
movie makers ("Airplane," 
et al) the singing and 
dancing lively enough to 
make Cab Calloway smile 
and tap his feet 

Joke: Ko-Ko- "This letter 

is in Japanese — Oh that's 

> right we are Japanese," this 

said by a typical CatskiUs 



vest pockets and whip put 
" Japanese fans. 
' This is Susan Moniz's 
best performance since she 
did "The Wiz" on the same 
stage. Moniz, as Yum -Yum, 
electrifies in the staccato, 
continuous manner of the 
Energizer Bunny. 

Lehman is proficient in 
a top-banana manner as 



Nancy Missimi outdoes 
herself with the 1940s zoot- 
suits and pepluni dresses 
with obis in the back. 

Set designer Thomas 
Ryan has the stage looking 
like a Japanese Tea Garden, 
and we loved it. — b y 
GLORIA DAVIS 



Andrew Uoyd Webber's 1982 musical, "Song and Dance," Is no empty title. This styl- 
ish production at Candlelight Dinner Playhouse offers a solid measure of both smglng 

and dancing. 

Act I belongs solely to HoUls Resnik, a proven talent In the vocal department who 
shines as young Emma, an English lass newly arrived in New York, looking for a green 

card and success as a milliner. 

In song after song, from the humorous to the 
W'^ Jkftl poignant, she tells of not-always-successful relationships 
>C' ;^ii^^. with men In her life, from an unfaithful Mend to a married 
.fS^mi^. suitor. The depth of her vocal range constantly impress- 
es. Unfortunately, during opening night, assertive 
musicians from the band drowned out bits and 
pieces of the lyrics. 

Candlelight makes clever use of Its hydraulic 
system to overcome limitations of its theater-in- 
the-round motif, particularly In the scene where 
Resnik is "floating" in a Los Angeles pool 

Act 11 introduces the rest of the ensemble, 
including co-star Daimy Herman who not only 
performs the strenuous role of Joe but, as in: 
Candlelight's recent "Five Guys Named Moe," 
serves as director/choreographer. One sul- 
try romantic scene, in particular, is a siz- 
zler. 

The cast gets a workout in Act 11, 
which is comprised almost exclu- 
sively of dance routines. Kenny 
Ingram, as a man from the 
streets. Is a dynamo on tap 
shoes. 

Heartwarming "Song and 

Dance" has settled in for an 

open run. Ticket information 

is available by calling 496- 

3000,— by TOM WITOM 




Holils Resnik and Daimy Herman In 
"Song and Dance. " 




Independence Day 
July 4th 




ALL SIZES 



^FACTORY AUTHORIZED 

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Closeouts $ Discontinued 

Fabrics Are 35 To 55% Off & 

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Price Per Set 
From 

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QUEEN . . .$168 
KING .... .$398 

Famous Name Sel5. Smooth To The Finesl 
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Twins From »98 To *428 

Fulls From *138 To »528 

Queens From *168 To *658 

Kings From »398 to *798 

est Selection Now!^ 




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Phone 395-11 16 J 



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■'**C^, 



'*^»* r«'f«»ia»»d Nowf oapertil 



Friday, Julyj2, 1993 



'^0\X;i'. 



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■!P>n 



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ANT^UES & CRAFTS. AKTIQOgSficCRfl 



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Antiques & CoUectlbles 

Anything from custard 
Glass to Cannon Balls ■ 
Buy & Soil 



CLOCK REPAIR 



Estates Purchased 
.22 Center Street. Grayslakel 

' (70a) 223-7454 

Tue9.-Sat1V.00 am. -5:00 p.m. 
Run. 12:00 noon --4-.0Op-iT>. 



GOING our OF BUSINESS SALE! 

940 Old McHeniy Rd^. 83) 
Buffiilo Grove, IL 

(708) sao-oggg. 



Ata\ 



CRAFTS S»W 

July 23, 24, 25 

at the Factory Outiet Center 

Hwy. 40 & 1-94 Kenosha, Wxs. 
Local & OuU>fState Exhibitors' 

For more infonnation o^^ 
exhibitor information caU: .^ 

(414) 763-3796 

1993 -^Hv^ 
ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES 

MARKET 



LTD. of Long Grove 

!^e o'old & Sflver Jeweliy 

•Glass Pressed & Cut ^ 

.China & Por^l^ •""^'^1™ 
.Old Books. Paintings, ^^^^^ 
.Always Buying Items of Interest 
Addresses: 

On the Square 

MlUPond , '^"'"^'f.f' 

(Lower Level) T ^R^SY 

U,ng Drove. lUlnols J"»'="°">i?5 

/08) 334-3512 — rO^Xs 



Sharron's Antique^) 

r. ,n . . sat 10-4 . Fri. Eve &Sun, By Chance 
"°;um^^So^*scrtrn..atmg mid-western 

Sr. Speciallzins In inuestment ^ 
-coS^^so/ctenv. butternut, u^alnul- 

Fumituiehand.slrlpping.&rettnlshlngavaflable. 

UfffiUtOUS SHIPMEHTS 

u=iua Arrived' American/European Antiques. 

WHIPPLETBEE IURM 
ANTIQUES 

210 S. Main S?.Wauconda. (708) 525-7808 

Open 7 days 10 to 5 



linfimieBioiiSs^oroi 

l-"^ Daily from 9:OO^oa^ ^^^ ^^ J 

Buying, saning, trading. Bm,9»jn«Wn9 0^^^^^^ 

Toys, Trains, Dols, ^J^^l'/'jJ^^Xcles. Arcade ttsms. 
Candy 0'l''I."°":.rs?USS=rvl«. We buy contents or 

AUCTIONEER LANCE PETERS 

1 Next Auction ' 

I Ca// Lori At 

(708)587-5848 

For Info 



OVER 'WQ^-ffiACE AVAILABLE 

AUG. 1 • SEPT. 5* OCT. 3 



gain nr Shine 

Food Served All Uay 

Gates open 8 to 4 -Free 

Parking 'Adm. $1.00 

call or Write TERRY SMITH 

(815)398-9546 

P.O. BOX 6598 

DnnKFQRP. It 61125^ 



fCS;' 



liSTT) 



^^ffloNS SALE JULY 17TH 
20% OFF New Christmas 

Fabric & Patterns 

arriving July-Aug 

,1, r ■-- -°T'iiai^Ym 



tome «nd expeWence ai. «c./g d^^^^^^ 

Dealer Inquiries 
Welcome 

(708) 894-8900 

1170W. Devon Avenue 
Elk Grove Village, XL 



; a 



iMK 







July 3rd & 4it» 

Celehratine Our 

GKAND OPENING 

ofOur 

PARK AVENUE ANTIQUE 
MALL'S ART GALLERY 

10% OFF ALL 
PURCHASBSl ^ 

6,000 SQUAREFEET^^ 






DISPLAYED BY 
35 LEADING DEALERS 

OPEN 7 DAYS 

Mon-SaL 10:00 a.m-^<M P--"- 
Sun.1V.00a.m.-5:00p.ni- 



345 PARK AVENUE 

ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 60002 

RfS DOWNTOWN ANTIOCH 

708::838:Li524 -= 




New & Used Boote 
All books 50% off publfehf price 

2MS. Trade-in Credit ^ 

BOOKWORM'S 
NOVEL EXCHANGE 

MAKE A »l^. «j:r" 

• •"'.°,!;,PnUrea marKet "Fun 

*1 ^ I Ike Arf/st S/iovi/<:ase 



Auntie Beth' s 
Doll Shop 

& 
Hospital 



Rcvmir & ResU>raUon 
AulhenUc 



Lake Zurich. Illinois 
708-540-6657 

OpenTuesdaythruSunday 



Lakeland Newspapers ; 



Friday, July 2. 1993 



2, 1993 



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,aH 



Lakeland Newspapers' COUNTY NEWS 



1/ 



T^ 




by ALEC JUNGE 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Flooding and the weather wreaked 
havoc in Northern Lake County, cutting 
off power to as many as 48,000 people. 

Lindenhurst, Fox Lake and Spring 
Grovie appeared to be hit the hardest. 
There were numerous power outages and 
power lines were down because of 
lightning and flooding according to 
Commonwealth Edison spokesperson 
Lisa Kim. 

"The area with the most damage was 
the North Suburban Area," Kim said. 
Lindenhurst, Fox Lake, Spring Grove 
were had the most damage. They still 



have 16,000 residents without power as of 
10 a.m." 

Kim said the attempts to restore power 
were hampered by the weather conditions. 

"The downed power lines and flooding 
made it difficult for teams to get the 
equipment in place," Kim said. 

Harlan Dam, media affairs director, for 
Com Ed, said the priority is restoring the 
main lines first. 

"Our main priority is to get the main 
feeder lines going first," Dam said. 

Dam said they will also focus in the 
Chain O Lakes area to get the areas that 
depend on sump pumps for flood control. 

"It is vital to get the power back in 
areas that use sump pumps. We're zeroing 



County residents copi 



Trees down, 
belongings ruined, 
travel delays 

by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Shen Conner and hundreds of other Lake 
County residents faced the same predica- 
. ment Wednesday morning. 

"Nobody is answering the phones," 
Conner said just past 7 a.m. 

Conner lives on Passavent Road in 
Round Lake and reported her four and one- 
half foot high fence was threatened by ris- 
ing waters. 

"I called 911 three times and nobody an- 
swered," she said. 

In Wauconda, Mayor James Eschcnbauch 
received a call from Marelene Bessler at 
5:30 a.m. 

"I had 12 inches of water in my base- 
ment," Bessler said. 

Bessler lives on Nancy Court and said 
the nearby swail quickly filled to capacity 
and water busted her window. 

Bessler operates a home day-care busi- 
ness, and the students had to be moved 
upstairs. 

"I just put in new carpeting. Now every- 
thing is ruined," she said. 

The water problems are caused by a 
neighboring property, she alleges. 

Verne Bueland, of 21600 W. 
Washington St in Grayslakc, felt fortu- 
nate when a tree fell when jt did. 

"If a car would have been there, it would 
have been a mess," Bueland said. 

Charles Brooker, of 350 Barron Blvd. in 
Grayslake. woke up to find an Evergreen 
tree had fallen in his yard. "It just missed 
the house," he said. 

Brooker heard winds blowing about 3 



a.m. and by 6 a.m. when he woke up, the 
tree had crashed to the ground. The tree 
was scheduled to be cut down later that 
day. 

Ella Irby of Park City said access to her 
Greenleaf Creek area neightwrhood could 
be gained from Washington Street but not 
to the south. 

"It took me 40 minutes to get to 
Belvidere," she said of a couple of miles 
trip. 

Power outages were reported from 
Gumee to Fox Lake as microbursts hit. 

Lake Villa Fire I>epL officials responded 
to a tree hitdng a house on Corona. 
Grayslake Fire Dcpt, responded to a tree 
on fire in Wildwood. 

Hardware stores reported a demand on 
sump pumps. 

"It was pretty wild. I got here at 6:50 
a.m. It has been non-stop," Sheila 
Diggrs, assistant store manager for 
Gumee Ace Hardware, said. 

"This reminds me of 1986," she said. • 

The "Ace in the Hole" battery operatdd 
model was popular due to the loss of 
power. 

Woodland Dist. 50 in Gages Lake can- 
celed summer school due to flooding. The 
elementary building had just sustained at 
least $20,000 worth of damage due to a 
lighming strike Saturday. 

A Gumee police department spokesper- 
son said all the viaducts in the Routes 41 
and 132 area were flooded. 

Park City Police Chief Robert Williams 
reported minor flooding in the Greenleaf 
Creek and Tcskc Boulevard areas. 

Gumee Gr^de School; located near the 
Des Plaines River, has survived at mid- 
moming, SupL Wayne Schurtcr said. 

"It was down to about normal -so it 
stopped just short of a problem," Schurtcr 
said. 










'j,*-*^ 

.*',;* 



^^ 





Motorists traveling south on Route 45 under Route 137 found ttiemseives tied 
up in bumper to bumper traffic until flood waters receded enougti for cars and 
trucks to pass through.— Photo by Gene Gabry 



in on areas that are vital to our 
constituents. It will take all day to do the 
work," Dam said. 

The damage to Fox Lake is severe and 
has already bren fatal. 

"A power outage at the comer of Rtes. 
134 and 12 caused a fatal accident," said 
James Busch police chief of Fox Lake. 

"Rte 12 and Grand Ave, and Rte. 12 
and 134 areas are without power," Busch 
said. 

In Lindenhurst, the power was out for 
three to four hours. It caused flooding and 
an overload at the sewage treatment plant. 

"A large part of the older part of the 
village was flooded. Village Administrator 
Jim Stevens said. The power being out in 



turn caused the sump pumps to fail. The 
basements flooded into the. sanitary 
sewage system causing the sanitary sewer 
treatment plant to become overloaded. 

"The system was pumping 6 million 
gallons per day instead of the 1.5 million 
gallons per day it is designed, for. The 
emergency generators worked and power 
was restored at 9:30 a.m.," Stevens said. 

As of Lakeland Newspapers deadline, 
the area by Woodland and Lindenhurst 
Dr., was still flooded. 

There were six areas where trees or 
large branches were blocking the roadways 
and flooding that made streets impassable, 
Stevens said. 




Dan Kearns of Boone's Cycle Service, 37575 N. Rt 59, Lake Villa watches as 
flood waters rush across the road. Kearns said his shop is a totalloss after he 
discovered four feet of water inside. — Photo by Gene Gabry 

Storm causes fatal crash 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

A severe thunderstorm, which knocked 
out power to the intersection of Rtes. 134 
and 12, apparently caused a traffic accident 
which resulted in the death of a Round 
Lake man on June 30. 

According to Fox Lake Lt. Edward 
Gcrretsen, the car driven by the 27-ycar- 
old man was struck in the intersection by 
a Spring Grove man, who allegedly didn't 
stop when seeing the traffic lights were 
out; 



"Normally, when a driver sees a traffic 
light out or malfunctioning, they treat it 
as a stop light," said Gerretsen. "That did 
not happen here." 

The name of the victim and the driver 
of the second car were being held by Fox 
Lake Police Until the next of kin were 
notified, which occurred after Lakeland's 
prass deadline on June 30. 

Gcrretsen said traffic citations are 
pending for the Spring Grove man once a 
full investigation is completed. 



Chain should remain open 
for 4th despite heavy rain 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The Chain O' Lakes should be open to 
boaters this holiday weekend despite the 
heavy dose rain the area experienced this 
past week. 

Chain 0' Lakes Waterway Agency 
Chairman Dr. William Dam said the 
waters on the Chain had dropped enough 
during the week, before the midweek 
storms, that the lakes could handle 
another inch or two rise before any 
closing would be announced. 

"We arc expecting a good weekend," 
said Dam. "There was been a good balance 
between rainfall and water levels dropping 



on the Chain. We don't anticipate any 
problems." 

However, the agency appears 
determined to continue it 150-fooi no- 
wake zone from the shoreline of all Chain 
lakes. 

"I have heard not one complaint about 
the no-w£jce zone," said Dam. 

The heavy rains, though good for area 
fanners and grass growers, have hampered 
Dam's efforts to continue the Agency's 
dredging all along the Chain. 

'Tm discouraged with the rain because 
it is really slowing our dredging work," 
said Dam. "We will now have to work 
into the late fall or eariy winter to get 
everything done." 



4 



2a Lakolahd Nwttpapw* 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



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^ inkfiland,N©wspapor|i^ijiU^^^;tgj^^A: 



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Dihihg and Entert ahiment 



Lakeltfe 



Lakeland 

Nemprnpere . 






n 






ACROSS 

1. Modem 

recording 
4. Part-time 
8. Symbol of 
patriotism 

12. — jacct 
(epitaph) 

13. Admitting 
a draft 

W.Cltyohtlie 
Truckcc 

15. Eggs (Ijatin) 

16. Cancuncoin 

17. City near 
Cleveland 

18.It*sdownto 
the nanosecond 

21. Sldll 

22.'*TheLady— " 
(movie) . 

23. White-water 
fleet 

26. Festive 

27. "Eureka!" 

30. Hand lotion 
additive - 

31. Enthusiast 

32. Crossword 
diagram 

j 33. Humorist 
1 34. Ewing wares 
35. Morticia's 

mister 
1 36. Chinchilla, c.g 
37. Chum 
1 38. One of the 

tenses 

1 45. Infinitesimal 
bit 

146. Navy mascot 




47. — jongg 

48. Knight's Mrs. 

49. Formerly 

50. Mamie's man 

51. Molt 

52. **Your Erroneous 
Zlones*^ author 

53. Whodurut writer 
Josephine 

DOW 

1. Karate blow 

2. Swan, e.g. 

3. OR souvenir 

4. Long, slender,' 
candies 

5. Oust 

6. Spar 



7. Versatile 

8. Bow;ling game 
division 

9. Jearis-maker 
Strauss 

10. In due time 
U, Vibrant disk 

19. Lot 

20. Wall climber 
23. Like sashimi 



tool 

31. Vulcan or 
Hephaestus 

32. Player's game 

34. Shared by us 

35. Hose holder 

36. Saw red 

37. UN goal 

38. Crazes 

39. Mormon territory 



24. In the manner of 40. Heavy reading? 



25. Navigation 
hindrance 

26. "My — Sal" 

27. Branch 

28. Waste no time 

29. Wood-working 



41. Crib sheet? 

42. Send out 

43. Bake-sale item 

44. "—Drive By 

Night": 



ARIES (March 21 to April 19)Thcre 
seem to be too many loose ends to tie 
up this week regarding a career matto'. 
Talks may break down. However, 
toward die end of the week, a new 
opportunity comes to you. Common 
sense is your ally in dealings with 
others. . 



LIBRA (September 23 to. October 
22) Before you can feel free to travel, 
a domestic matter will first have to be 
settled. You will be pleased about 
happy developments In a loved one's 
life this week. This week's financial 
developments are in your favor. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to Novcm- 

TAURtJS(April20toMay20) You ber 21) You may have difficulty 

may receive misleading advice about a making up your mmd about an invesl- 

financial matter. You seem to have ment or financial move this weclc 

your. head on your shoulders where Talks with bankers about loans and 

career interests arc concerned. Your mortgages are favored. A hcart-to- 

feet arc definitely on the ground this heart talk at home eliminates 

week. A fm opportunity arises this misunderstandings with loved ones, 
weekend, though some social plans 

will be changed. >^ SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to 

December. 21) Partners may not agree 
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) It will .on a possible purchase, but otherwise 
be difficult to agree with others about you will enjoy r»harkable rapport with 
financial interests this week. Watch each other. Now Is die time to jpake 
your use of credit Higher-mind pur- important plans together. A career op- 
suits bring happiness. A talk with a p9I^^I^ty ^^y^^^ I'^^S^^^^^^.y^^ 



lawyer or adviser is beneficial. Watch 
temperament in romance. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) In 



thisvi^eek. 

CAPRICORN (December 22 to 
January 19) You seem undecided 



some ways, you feel misunderstood or about how to handle a job concern, and 

unappreciated this week. Sclf-analysb you will make no progress until you 

brings you important insights. Judg- makeupyourmind.Itshouldbeagood 

ment is good regarding financial inter- ' ' '" *- !— ?--^=— — --•-•^ 
ests. Dealings with bankers about 
loans and property improvements are 
favored now. ^ , 



week for income. An invitation to visit 
others comes this weclc Both travel 
and dating are favored for the 
weekend. 



i 

i 

'L 

i 



EHUD SE1I21B BmClQ 



liiolaUimaidlglumlilniJl 



HQEi mmei . 

□mo Qa[3 EHaBom 
0130 osn 



iOlNl I m\ I iXlllOOl J|U|3ld| 



BmsED inaaQ Emm 




LEO(July23toAugust22)Youwiir AQUARIUS (January 20 to 

be busy on the job th£ week and may Februatty 18) You may havesome wor- 

have to postpone a social engagement, ries about a needless relationship. Get 

Partners work well together as a team, things off your che^ and realize that 

Though some business appointments others arc more than willing to meet 

will be changed, you will still meet you halfway. The weekend is not a 

with a wonderful new opportunity for good time for having company over. 
financial gain. ^^^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ March 20) 

VIRGO (August 23 to September Interruptions from mends could keep 

22) Problems involving children con- you from completing an important 

cem you for part of the week. Efficien- mental project or a domestic task. You 

cy marks your performance on the job. will get thd*answcrs you are seckiiig 

Talks with those in important positions about an investment concern later in 

go well. Luck is with you regarding the week. Talks with business advisers 

publishing, travel and personal are favored. Make a point of getting the 

publicity. privacy you need this weekend. 

01993 by King Features Synd. 









^^^^0^^^-S--<^^--'' ^ 




affic 
^lit 
tdid 



nver 
'Fox 
>vcre 
and's 

s are 
nee a 



Join Us For Our Weekend 
All'U-Can-Eat Specialsl 

FRIDAY Fish Fry M.95 

7-Entree Buffet *7.95 

SATURDAY 

Crab Legs $15.95^ 

Prime Rib- 
$9.95 



wiih 



Soup, 
SikdDv 
& Dciscn Incl. 
ALLUUITETS 



SUNDAY 
7-Entree Buffet 

Baked Ham, Roasi 

Poric, Roast Turkey, *7 Q ^ 

Pasta. Shrimp & t t^U 

BBQRibs 

For Reservations 

(708)395-1707 

28375 W. Rt. 173. Antloch 
3MllBsWoBtOfRt. 59 



Under 
12 



ENIOY SUNDAY BRUNCH 

Served 10 a.m. • 2 p.in. 

Adults '8.95 Children '4.50 

Children under 3 are FREE 

Featuring... 

•Hot Entrees •Belgium Waffles 

•Entrees for the 'lighter* appetite 

•Ice Crearri Desserts "Fresh Fruit On season) 

•Omiettes made to order 

•Homemade pastries •Varied appetizers Including 

•Smoked Salmon •Salad & Frutt Bar 

•Complimentary Glass of Wine 



Enterfainment by Carl Roth 




HimCOimYCLlIB 



(81 S) 670-2631 



5419 Konoaha St. 
Rtchmdnd, \l 



St. 173, IBlk.tattOtRt, 13 



k3' 



IllllllllllllllllllllUIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHiilllllltllll ^! 



Uc.# 
B-796 



BINGO 

Every Wednesday 630 p.m. 

HALI^ FOR KENT 

Lei us cater your wedding, aniiiversaiy, 
birthday parties & bowling banquets. 

OPEN Sunday BreaJ^fast- 7 tum. to Noon 
TO PUBUC ^ ^ 

n^ We Love To See ^ 
^ New Faces! Join Us! ^ 

Lake Villa VFW RailroacI & Grand 



Post 4308 



356-9846 



iiitiniriiiiiiiinriiiiiimiiiiiiinmiiimimiiiiiiimiiiiiir. 



n 



:c any 

ipears 
ot no- 
Chain 

t^about 

or area 
mpcred 
gcncy's 

)ecauso 

work," 

work 

to get 



^2,1993 



IVe' re Creating A Rea l Stir! 

' GllimitiHIO' 
— "Stfff^^ 

ORIENTAL STIR FHY ' 

•Besl Egg Rolls In Townl 
•Solocllona Include Appellzere 
Chicken. BogI 4 Vegetarian Entrees 



FAMILY DINING CARRY-OUT 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 
SUN. -mRU. THUHS. H-0; Fflt.-SAT. It TO 10 

Wc cator your party or special event. 
Five otden or more wIIIIm delivered. 
THE RIGHT CHOICE... 




We're the fresh 
alternative to fast foodi 

Inquire about (ranchlse opportunities 



I 949-79121 

FAX YOUR ORDER 949-7968 

(Comer 01 Rts. 60 & 45) 
1565 S. LAKE ST. (JewolA/onturo Shop. Cntr.) MUNDELEtN 



^ ^'1' OJountrg ^ijwtre 

pestnurttnt & ^nnqucte 
Gracloua dining In the Wesley Sears Country Gstale 



ilie 



*6 



»5 



Itmch 



Now's a grand lime of ihc year to 

enjoy a leisurely luncheon at the 

Country Squire. Our luncheon 

spcdals include appetizer, salad, 

potato or vegetable, Ijcvcrage and 

dcsscrt.Wc also have a "lite" lunch 

menu or our soup and satidwich 

spcdals from only »3.50. Dring i„„^^«^ona Routea 120 & 46 

your fncnds and enjoy our Grayslake, IL 

flowering grounds from our «l«jo«u»»^ *« 

expanded dining roomsl 



% 



Your hosts,' 
\Bill & Kris Govas 




GRATTAN'S WHARF 

On Deep Lake Rt. 132 To 

Deep Lake Rd. Left on 2nd St 

356-0050 




FRIDAY NIGHT 

FISH FRY 

All-You-Can-Eat 

$095 



in 

Nightly 
Specials 



•CLOSED MONDAYS- 
AU major eraitt catd* honand. 



(708)223-0121 



^k 



FRIDAY, JULY 2 - JUMPIN* BONE 
SAT., JULY 3 - SUSPECT 

ROCK <N ROLL PARTY 

SUNDAY, JULY 4TH 2PM - ? 
CORN & BRAT ROAST 

PRIZES/ MUSIC BY JUMPIN' BONE 

FUN! 

KARAOKE Every Thursday Night 



KAKAUKt tvery Thursday Nighi 
Meat Raffle Every Sunday 12 Noon 



7^,KK»fir^rr s r - 



rr n r i ' * '^ ^ 




Friday. July 2. 1993 



Lakeland Nowspapiert 39 



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LakeUmci 

i.XL-\\spuj)CiS .. 



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a?^j'4l'^Sc*Jt^»-<^>0*j^g^f^ i 



OBITUARIES 



i%y*im<^>^h^'i4mii:^4^m^^>erxfmmMsmms§^f^ I 



Rudolph H. Brausam, Jr. 

Of Antioch, IL passed away Saturday, June 26, 
1993 at Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest, IL. He was 
bom December 13, 1921 in Chicago, IL the son of the 
late Rudolph and Mary Swoboda Brausam. He moved 
to Antioch in 1952. He was a member of St. Peter 
Church in Antioch. He served in the U.S. Army during 
"World War II and was a member and past commander 
of the V.F.W. Post #4308 of Lake Villa, IL. He was 
also an Honorary and Life Member of the Military 
Order of Coolies. Mr. Brausam had worked as a 
machinist for Johnson Motors in Waukegan, IL for 31 
years, retiring in 1983. On May 1, 1943 he manied 
Vivian Alex in Chicago, IL. 

Survivors include his wife Vivian, two sons Donald 
(Linda) and Raymond. (Marie), both of Antioch; one 
daughter Maryann (Dennis) Sazama of Lake Villa, IL; 
two brothers Raymond of Homestead, FL and Albert of 
Las Vegas, NV. He was the grandfather of eight. 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian Burial will 
be held at 10:00 AM on Tuesday, June 29, 1993 at Sl 
Peter Church, 557 Lake Street, Antioch. Interment will 
be in Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. Friends may call at 
the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main Street (Rtc. 83), 
Antioch from 4 until 8 PM Monday where V.F.W. 
services will be held at 7:00 PM. 

Ronald L. Cass, Sr. 

Age 54, of Wildwood passed away on Monday, 
June 28, 1993 at St. Luke's Hospital in Racine, WI. He 
was bom July 21, 1938 in Tracy, MN and had been an 
area resident for most of his life. Ron was a former 
VP/Trcasurcr of the Lumbermen's Dealer Assoc, and a 
member of the Power Squadron. He was the owner- 
operator of Ron's Special Woods and had retired from 
Grand Avenue Lumber in Waukegan after 28 years 
service. 

He is survived by his wife, Joaimc (nee Marfia); his 
three sons Ronald (Brcnda) Cass, Jr. of Gages Lake, IL, 
Donald Cass of Gurnee and John (Lisa) Cass of 
Kenosha, WI; his grandchildren April, Donnie, Jessie, 
Tony, Tiffany and Taylor; parents C. Carl (Olga) Cass 
of Grayslakc and his brother Robert (Darlcnc) Cass of 
Gages Lake; also by aunts, uncles and cousins. 

Funeral services will be at 10:30 A.M. Friday, July 
2, 1993 at the Peterson Funeral Home, 408 N. Sheridan 
Rd., Waukegan with Fr. Paul J.. Cull officiating. 
IntcrmcTtt will be Ascension Cemetery, Libcrtyville. 
Friends may call at the funeral home from 6 to 9 PJ4. 
Thursday, July 1, 1993. 



(708) 223-81 61 



Leroy Moore >- 

Age 72, a Fox Lake, IL resident for the past 27 
years, formerly of Antioch, IL and Fulton, MS died 
Thursday, June 24, 1993 at the St Thcrcse Hospital in ' 
Waukegan, IL. He was bom on March 30, 1921 In 
Fulton, MS to Chester and Cora Lee (Brown) Moore. 
Mr. Moore was a veteran of World War II, having 
served with the U.S. Army. He was employed with the 
Modinc Manufacturing Co. in Ringwood, IL for oyer 
20 years. 

Survivors include his wife Betty Moore (nee 
Sellers) of Fox Lake, IL with whoni he was united in 
marriage on July 8, 1966; two sons Roy Allen Moore of 
Spring Grove, IL and Gary Lee (Sheila) Moore of MS; 
one daughter Jackie Nell (Alan) Wagner of Lake Villa, 
IL; three granddaughters Stephanie Rencc Wagner, 
Cassandra Lynn Wagner and Siamantha Marie Moore; 
three brothers. Dow (GabricUa) Moore, Charles (Billic 
Fay) Moore and Stanley (Lorraine) Moore, all of 
Mississippi; two sisters Bessie Bates and Lois 
Underwood, both of Mississippi. He was preceded in 
death by one brother, Dorsey Moore and by two sisters. 
Ruby Comer and Mamie Moore. 

Friends of the family may call from 4-9 PM, 
Sunday, June 27 at the K.K. Hamshcr Funeral Home, 
12 N. Pislakcc Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL (The Chapel on 
the Lake); and from 5-9 PM Tuesday, June 29 at the 
McNeecc-Morris Funeral Home in Fulton, MS. 
Services will be conducted in Mississippi at 11:00 AM 
on Wednesday. Burial will follow in the Fulton 
Cemetery, Fulton, MS. 

Luella S. "Babe" Bennett, nee Hook, 

Age 86, a resident of Fox Lake, IL for the past 66 
years, formerly of Grayslakc, IL died Monday, June 28, 
1993 in Libcrtyville, IL. She was bom in Long Lake, IL 
on August 13, 1906 to Guy and Mac (Brown) Hook, a 



U "H 



H O M.- 



122 SOUTH MILWAGKEE AVENUE 

LAKE VILLA. ILLINOIS 60046 

708/35Cv2146 



Douglas W.Hill 

Age 51, a resident of Fox Lake, IL died Friday, 
June 25, 1993 in his home. Mr. Hill had been crriployed 
as a chemical engineer for Abbot Labs in North 
Chicago for ten years, before his retirement. He was a 
veteran of the Viet Nam War, and was a member of the 
Fox Lake American Post #703. 

Survivors include his longtime companion and 
friend Catherine McDaniel of Fox Lake, IL; two sisters 
Sheila Coughlin of Kccne, NH and Anne Marie Hill of 
Baldwinville, MA; four nephews and one niece. He was 
preceded in death by his parents Walter E. and Eleanorc 
(Dclorey) HiU. 

Arrangements for a private interment were 
completed by the K.K. Hamshcr Fimcral Home, 12 N. 
Ptstakce Lake Rd,, Fox Lake, IL (The Chapel on the 
Lake). For information, call (708) 587-2100. 

Henry C. Zimmerman 

Age 90, of Villa Park passed away on June 27, 

1993. He was a formcrowner of Zimmermans Cottages 

on Rie. 173. He was the beloved husband of Edmec 

(nee Warner); loving father of Janice (Edmund) 

pioneer West Lake County family. She was a longtime Johnson; dear grandfather of Sharyl and Scott; fond 



ANNOITNCEMENTS 



""" "" m 




Notices 



-ROMATIC CANDLELITE 

WEDDINGS- Smokay Mourlalns 
'Ordained Ministers 'Elegant 
Chapel 'Photographs 'Ftorais 
•Urnos *Vkioo3 'AccomodaUons 
'Modest PrIcasI *No waiting- 
btood tests 'Galllnburg, Tenn. 
•t/BOO-WED-RINQ. 



.employee for the Koening and Jensen Bakery and 
Restaurant in Fox Lake, IL, and was a member of the 
Fox Lake Commimity Church. 

Survivors include one son Robert E. Bennett of 
Libcrtyville, IL; one daughter Helen Murphy of La 
Grange Park, IL; three grandsons Michael Murphy, 
William Bennett and Robert Bennett; nieces, nephews 

•and other relatives survive. She was preceded in death 
by her late husband Milton VMilt" Bennett in 1965; two 
brothers Charles Hook and Robert Hook; two sisters 
Jess Shclton and Bertha Scyl; and by her daughter-in- 
law Pat Bennett and her son-in-law Phil Murphy. 



brother of Ruth (the late Harold) Pierce and Mildred 
Zimmerman, the late Harriett (Dewey) Duhrkopf, and 
Rolx^t Zimmerman. Brother-in-law of Lucille (the late 
George) Zimmerman; uncle to many nieces and 
nephews. 

Funeral services will be held on July 30, 1993 at 
Steuerlc Fimeral Home, 350 S. Ardmore Ave., Villa 
Park, IL. Interment is at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch, 
IL. 



The Deadline for Obituaries & Death Notices 
Is; 5 p.ni. on Tuesday. 



SHERRY'S ELECTROLYSIS 
AND PERMANANT CoenMtics- 
Brows^ tye and lip lining. NEW 
OFFICE In Uk» Villa. (708) 
244-1640. 

VENDORS NEEDED FOR Food 
Booths. Crafia, Antiques, Ftoa 
Market Trade Exhbtts, Car Show 
lor FESTIVAL OF THE 
AMERICA'. Aug. 28 &29, HoWay 
Paik. Rb. 12 &134, Ins^esUo, Fof 
BobttT applicallon or f esWa) Mo. 
Call (7Q8)662>3677. 

• * WANTED: • * CANVAS 
DONATIONS. NEV/ or USED. ■ 
Otd Tents, Etc. to cover a lOtt. 
Wigwam end Sweat Lodge. Call 
Jean (615)875-6610; / 

• • WANTED: * 'TRUCK 
RENTAL DONATION- to Dettvef 
badly needed supplies to people 
on Rno RkJgo Indan R^e/valbn, 
South Dakota. CAN YOU or 
YOUR ORGANIZATION HELP 
USl Call Jean (815)675-6610. 

SEEKING FAMILIES TO host 
English epeaklDg European high 
school studeiis tor 83-94 In your 
community. Explore the world 
without leaving home. STS 
FourKlatton, 1/800-382-HOST. 



Jy!ijj*-tv-.'>iv^r>- •3'(.\.<--^-i-.'i, 



Grieftiotes^ 

How do I help the elderly 

at the time of a funeral? 

Death of a loved one is painfuL There is a tendency 
to believe that the elderly adjust more easily because 
they "should" anticipate the loss. Having more time 
to prepare does not guarantee that grieving will be 
easier. The elderly may have fewer resources such as 
friends, money or good health. Losing a partner or 
long time friend may mean living life alone at a time 
when a person may be least able to be independent 
Support from family and friends at this tinie is most 
important. Being over-protective or taking away a 
person's independence by making decisios for them 
is not desirable and may oe harmful. Help the elder- 
ly begin their adjustment by attending the funeral 
and offering specific help. 

^ ^ ^ / 




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12 N. PIstakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, lllfnols 
Phone: (7O8J587-2100 • (8151 385-1001 



ARRAJJ 

Geneva Arrajj, 57, of 

Round Lake Park, IL, 

formerly of Grayslake, 

IL. 
BALDASSANO 

Nick J. Baldassano, 

65, of Fox Lake, IL. 

Arr: The Ringa 

Funeral Home, Lake 
ViUa.IL. 
BALES, Sr. 
Eugene F. Bales, Sr., 
70, of Gages Lakei' 
IL. Arr: Strang 

Funeral Chapel, 
Grayslake, IL. 

BOHN 

Naomi R. Bohn, 75, 

of Round Lake, IL. 

Arr: Wenban Funeral 

Home, Lake Forest, 
IL, 

HANSEN 

Lionel H. "Red" 
Hansen, 90, of 
Libcrtyville, IL. Arr: 
McMurrough Chapel, 
Libenyville, IL. 
MOUNTFORD 
Albert "Al" 

Mbuntford, 68, of 
Libcrtyville, IL. Arr: 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Libcrtyville, 
IL. 



MULLOY 

Michael J. Mulloy, 

39, of Gurnee, IL. 

Arr: Ringa Funeral 

Home, Lake Villa, IL. 

PFLUG 

Howard A. Pflug, 82. 

of Wauconda, IL. Am 

Strang Funeral 

Chapel, Grayslake, DL, 

PLOTZ 

Carl A. Plotz, 76, of 

Grayslake, IL. Arr: 

Strang Funeral 

Chapel, Grayslake, 

IL. 



POTTS 

Alvin Potts, 85, of 

Mundelein, IL. Afr: 

Kristan Funeral Home 

P.C., Mundelein, IL, 

TERRY 

William R. Terry, 62, 

of Lindenhurst, IL. 

Arr: Strang Funeral 

Home, Antioch, IL. 

WIMBLE 

Irene V. Wimble, 87, 

of Liberty ville Manor. 

Arr: Strang Funeral 

Chapel, Grayslakc, 



WARNINGI 

Wh/$p«nd too much?. 
$400 o( irit|ew«lry lor only S260 
Bua. opt, loo, NO InvMtmant. 

NO reUHIng 

Call (708) 292-5236 

(24hrs) 




Lost & Found 



ARE YOU THAT Good 
Samarlllan who FOUND 
somoones PET or speda] lost 
Article? Gal Lakotand Classffied, 
arvJ gel resulta, FOUND acts are 
HUN FREE ol Charge. Call 
(708)223-8161. 

FOUNEll MffERED a}NURE 

Vldniiy of Breriwood and RolSrB 
Rd..TT)urB. June 17lh cal (708) 
740-1321. ^ 

MISSING JUNE 20TH. BLACK 
AND WHrrE SHELTY, Rt.12 & 
State Paiit Rd,, Spring GraweyFcK 
Uke area. REWARDI (708) 
587-6151. 



Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home 

222 North Rosedale Court ' 
Round Lake, Illinois 60073 




OurfiiH-service Funeral Home offers: 

• pre-arrangement planning 

• pre-funded funerals 

• traditional services 

• contemporary services 

• customized services 




Funeral Director/Manager 

Je£Erey E.Jordan 

Saving Round Lake for over 30 years 



George R. Justen & Son Funeral Home 

3519 West Ellin Street, McHcnry 



Justen'sUbnder lake Funeral Home 

761 1 Hancock Drive, Wonder Lake 



SPRINQ 
AND on 
RUN HE 
(We~dl8. 
CALLTC 



ADOPT 

ALTERI 
make pi 
areave 

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flmaper 
you to 
thai yob! 
of love,- 
Medlcs 
court a 
paid. I> 
Ptea»' 
6837;^ 

ADGT 

LAUQiJ 

your I 

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to giv 

future' 

paid. 

and 

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40 Lakeland Nowcpapers 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



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Good 
•OUND 
da] lost 

lasstfled, 
tads are 
30. Call 

lONURE 
idRolUns 
Bal(708) 

I. BLACK 
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Lakeland Newspapers 



f f ^ r ■ 

Lakcliuid 

. .\i\\spn|jL-i"*» J 



CLASSIFIE>D ADVERTISING 




j^'|i*s»«*ca- 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 




Free 



SPRING CLEANING?? FREE 
AND GIVEAWAY ITEMS CAN 
RUN HERE AT NO CHARQEl 
(We~ discourage any pal ads) 
CALL TODAY. (708) 2ZJ-ai61 . 




Personals 




Pereonab 



' \ 



ADOPTION- A LOVING 

ALTERNATIVE, Please hetp us 
make our dream come true. We 
are a very caring ar)d successful 
couple wHo want to become (un 
Ime pererts to yotr beby. We ask 
you to consider us and know 
thai yourdild wll havea lletlme 
of bve. t>applr>es3, ar)d ^eoirty. 
Medical, legal, counseling arid 
court approved living expenses 
paid. Information confidential. 
Ptease cal our attorney (706)967- 
6837. 

ADOmON- ABUNDANT LOVE, 
LAUGHTER, and alfectk)n await 
your baby; Happily married, 
financially secure couple long 
to give our hearts and bright 
future to your neMbora E)q}ense3 
paid. Confidential, Call Jayne 
and Ben 1/800-722-6620 
Weetoiays Biter Sipm or weekanda 
anytime. 

ADOPTION- BECAUSE YOU 
CARE: Our shared pain can 
become shared happiness. Your 
very difficult situation can be 
eotveid by ours. Alow us to adopt 
your baby. Rnanclally secure 
elementary teacher and 
accountant wll t>e loving, devoted 
parents. We wlO give your baby 
a life of love, security, and 
knowledge of a birth mother who 
. made a loving unseStah choice, 
Medical, legal couseltng, and 
court approved expenses paM. 
Confidential. Please call our 
attorney at (708)957-6e43. 

ADOPTION- HAPPILY 

MARRIED Nurse and successful 
Businessman wish lo share 
wonderful and kiving home with 
your newtom. LsgalCorAdertlal. 
Please call Vera and Don, 
800/450-1607. 

ADOPTION- PROFESSIONAL 
COUPLE unable to have our 
own child. We would love to 
adopt an infant to share our Dfe. 
Have home In a wooded area wlh 
lots of neighborhood chikJran, 
t good schools, relatives end 
frfsfxls wtK) have also adopted 
children and a loving and 
st4)poitlve extended famlfy. CaO 
iis at our hiome Tolt-Free 1/BOO- 
377- 1602 Avh/a/Lfle. 



ADOPTION- OODLES OF love 
we have to give. WONDERFUL 
life yourchnd wfi) live: We k)ve 
lo sM, read and bike, travel, Lsb. 
dog, swim and Nka. Ourspiedal 
town Is grand: Great schools, 
trees, sand. Expenses' paid. 
800/450-1607. 

ADOPTKIN- AFFECTIONATE, 
DOWN to earth couple bng to 
give your baby warm at home 
Mom, professional Dad and 
unlimited opporlunHles. We're 
Catholic, happily marrfed 11- 
years and we are easy to taK wtttl 
We'd like to l>e)p you. Can Diane 
and Michael, (70a)289-6508 
collect. 

ADOP1X)N: DAD, STAY-HOME 

. Mom'andSyr. old Son (adopted), 
have tots of love and lime lo 
give your chlki. Peaceful home, 
finandaly secure. Willing to stay 
In touchi Legal/Medfcat paid. 
CairCollect Jan and Bob, 
(205)716-0103. 

; CHEZCH BOY,17, ANXIOUSLY 
awaiting host family. Enjoys 
sports reading and oorr^uters. 
Other Scandinavian, European 
hiigh school students arriving 
August. Call Baibara (217)243- 
8453or1/800-SIBLlNG. 

DANISH BOY, 17, anxiously 
awafting host family. Enjoys 
sports and music' Other 
Scandinavian, European high 
school students aiTtvIng August. 
Call Barbara (217)243-8453 or 
1/800-5IBUNG. 

FANTASY FASHIONS1 ADULT 
Faitasy FashkxB. In marv stylos, 
sizes, and flavora. Send $2.00 for 
Cok>r Catalog plus Free GIFTS. 
P.O.Box 666, Island Uke, IL 
60041. 

HELP US FULFILL OUR 

DREAMS. We are a bving couple 
that kings to share our lives and 
tove with a baby. We can provide 
a happy and secure IKe for your 
. chlkl, a beaulHul and spacious 
suburban home and many 
wonderful opportunities. Legal 
and altowable expenses paid. 
Please can our attorney, SARA 
(312)975-0535 (confidential, 
collect OK) TJ. 

LONELY? WE WEREN'T 

CREATED TO BE ALONE. Free 
Singles club appflcatlon. Send 
S AS.E. to The Club, P.O.Box 
67. Zk)n,lL 60099. - 




ily 2, 1993 



' '-'^-f 



•' REUNIONS* • 
WARREN CUSS OF 1 983, Will 
be hekl Saturday, October 16, 
1993, at the Princess In 
Uboftyvle. AddHional Konnallon: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 
(815}477-085a Of (800)924-6643 
(CtiJcago Sutxirbarl areas only). 

•' REUNIONS* •' 
WAUCONDA CLASS OF 1983, 
Will be hekj Friday October 1 , 
1993, Homecoming weekend, 
at Barringlon Banquets In 
Barringloa Addtional kiomelion: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 
(81 5)477-0658 or (800)924-6643 
(Chicago Suburban areas only). 

" REUNIONS* -^ 
WAUKEGAN CLASS OF 1953, 
Will be held both Friday (Ice- 
breaker) and Saturday (dinner), 
August 20,21, 1993 at Bonnie 
Brook Country Club, Waukegan. 
Anyone Nerved In attending or 
knowing o1 someone from this 
class please call Additional 
Information: Contact Alumni 
Systems al (ai5>477-0658 or 
(800)924-6643 (Chicago 
SiAurban areas only). 

•• REUNIONS* • 
WAUKEGAN CLASS OF 1968, 
Wn be held Saturday August 7, 
1993 at the Holiday Inn, 
MundQiekv Adcffionel Momnsllon: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 
(815)477-0658 or (800)924-6643 
(Chkago Suburtian areas only). 




Personals 



PERSONAL PROTECTION! 
PROTECT your self and your 
f aniiy at home or away. AlfordeMe 
Alarms, Sprays, ETC, Free 
Catalog; P.O.Box 866, Island 
:LakB.IL 60041. „ 



PREGNANCY? 

Adoption can be a good 
option. We can help 
wilh no cost to you. 

CALL 

The Adoption 

Connection 

^708)433-7821 



•^ 

:::■ 



EMPLOYMENT 



T il im iiii imnnri m 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



FRIENDLY HOME PARTIES 

now has openings tor 
demonstrators. No cash 
Investment. Part-time hours will 
full time pay. Two calak)gs, over 
700 Items. Can 1/800-483^875. 



Contemporary ChrisTian 
Choir 'Tell the Wofkr zmA% 
good voices, ags* 14-33. No 
pay but lou ol talltfaciion. 
CaHlordeiBllc. 
(708)526-8306 
AtkrorWak or Miriam- 



Certified 
lifeguards 

Hours: 

^1:00-4:00 M-F 

& weekentjs 

(708)360-YMCA 



BBBaHe9E9BBBB9 



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• • REUNIONS* * 
GRAYSLAKE CLASS OF 1983, 
Will be hekl Saturday, October 
16, 1993, Homeooming vwekend. 
at Holiday Inn, Mundeleln. 
Addilkinal Infonnatlon: Contact 
Alumni Systems al (815)477- 
0858 or (600)924-6643 (CHcago 
Suburban areas only). 

• • REUNIONS* • 

LAKE ZURICH Class ot 1973 
wtllbo hold Saturday Oct.O, 
Homecoming weekend, at the 
Princess In Llwtlyvte. For further 
Information contact Alumni 
■ Systems, Inc. at (615)477-0858 
or (800)924-6643 
(ChlcagoAsubuttan area only) 
or wrlle to Alumni Systems, Inc. 
6201 Scott Ln., Crystal Lake, IL 
60014. 

• * REUNIONS* • 

ROUND LAKE CLASS OF 1983. 
Will be hekl Saturday, October 
2, 1993, Homecoming weekend, 
at Holiday Inn. Mundeleln. 
Addltk>nal Infonnatlon: Contact 
Alumni Systems at (815)477- 
0858 or (800)924-6643 (Cticago 
Su burban areas only). 

• • REUNIONS* • 
WARREN CLASS OF 1984,.|3 
seeking classmates lor 1994 
Reut^n. Additional Information: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 
(ei5)477-0858 or (800)924-6643 
(Chkago SubuttMtn areas only). 



i 



(708)223-8161 



EMPLOYMENT 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Help Wanted 
Pait-Time 




*mm Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




• ^ Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



TELEMMKETING 

We're looking for people who 
enjoy talking on the phone. If you 
do, we'll train you in the exciting 
field of Telemarketing. We Offer: 

•Pleasant Working Conditions 
•AM, PM & Earty Eye. Hours 
•Houriy Wage Plus Commission 

This is an Ideal position for 
someone wanting to supplement 
their income, Sound good? 
Then call Nigel. 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 
30 S. Whitney, P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 

(708)223-8161 



Experience 

required 

Apply in 
Person 

cDino's Den 3 

gas E. Grand Ave. 3 
D Fox Lake, IL a 
g (708) 587-66043 

HBBaBQuyuyQa 



• * REUNIONS' • 
GR^.YSLAKE CLASS OF 1963, 
soeklrtg dossmatea for reunkin 
tentatively set for July 24 at 
Gumee Holiday Inn. Contact 
John Carlson at (708)362-5101 
with Intormallon. - . 

•• REUNIONS* • 

BARRINGTON CLASS OF 1983, 
WILL be held Homecoming 
weekend Friday, October 8, 
BanlngtonBanquetelnBarrlnglDn. 

• ' REUNIONS* * 
ZION-BENTON CLASS OF 1984. 
IS Seeking dassmales lor 1 994 
Reunbn. AddAlonel lnfonnatk)n: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 
(815)477-0658 or (800)924 -6643 
(Chicago Suburtan areas only). 

•♦REUNION 1 1" 
LAKE ZURICH HIGH SCHOOL 
Class of 1973 Is Planning thelr 
20lh Class Reunion tor Oct. 
1993. If you have any Informaftkxi 
or need any— I you tiave moved 
or know of anyone who has, 
ptoaso cortad Shanxi (70e)566- 
4724 or I3ebb!e (708)516-4313. 
Pkjase call V.you would like to 
Mp. 

COME TO A MYSTERY 
HOSTESS TUPPERWARE 
PARTY. Place an order and 
you might WIN ALL the great 
Hostess GItsi Uml is^ieopto per 
party. CaH for dales and details. 
MoBssa (708) 740-0355. 

NACEL EXCHANOE 

STUDENTS will bring the 
oxchment of their culture Into 
your home for 25days thb July. 
Please Invio them. Ced 1/800645- 
9655, 708-907-0303. 




BOOKKEEPER 

Some secretarial. 3 
days a week. For Real 
Estate Management 
Office. In Bannockbum 
at tollway & Rte. 22. 
Lotus & Wordstar or 
Word Perfect. 

(708) 945-6600 



GENERAL 
OFFICE/ 

CaSTOMER 
SERVICE 

1 week day, 1 weekend 
day . 20 hours, $6 per hour ; 

(708)244-0016 

^pcriarJJTrtonneL' 



MANAGERS AND 
DEMONSTRATORS 

Par^Ba, a tvwnV yssr oU oorrpa- 
rv- Newto lino^ fOeed demoristra- 
iDiB & managers duing tie Xmas 
season & ttiru-out tie New Year 
Feahilng oonyiefe in a olC olonisI 
carides of Cspeood & horns doo& 
tafng aocsssories. Woik the days & 
hous you want Work PfT/ Earn 
F/T psy. Earn monthly bonus & 
Free tps & awards. Free kiV No 
wper. nee Free tiahhg. Jdn ai 
raiityfts sales team. Theratlorfs 
Bstest gnovAxi nidsizB (Srect sales 
company. (708) 393-6924J-Iidng 
new lor AuguEt start ip. Maiy Arm 
KteOon*! 



'£iiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii± 

|Lifegu2irds| 

lutings Lake = 

YMCA 

=is now hirlngE 
Ecertifled llfe-S 
Sguards for the= 
=summer and forS 
=the fall. For moire= 
Sin formations 
Eplease call . = 

I (708) 356-4006 = 
= or stop by = 

giinimmiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiifF. 




Cook €^iutty 



AISZSOIlIirCBNESrrS ^IARKET guide RE/U/ESTAIK SmnCEDIRCCroRT 



NoUcM t 

Loita Found 2 

Fret 3 

PaciOfudt 4 

Auctlora S 

Buslnau PAfwxuia 

FInindal 7 

H^WsntedPoit-Thno 19 

HelpWajnadFuMTrm 20 

Enployment AQMides 21 

BinlneM OpportuntlM 22 

Wok Wanted 23 

CttldCafs 24 

SdMoMnttnxlkin 25 

UfARKEfT GCIDB 

AntlquM 30 

AfjpllancM 31 

Bvlw/Trads 32 

Ba2aan/Cnt\M 33 

Buldir>o MitirUt 34 
ButlrKni/Otflos Equipmant 35 

Etectrontt/CotTputefB 38 

FaimQukto 37 

Flwuood 38 

Qan«a/RurT¥Tiage Salet 40 



Qood Thingi lo Eat 41 

Hone* & Tack 42 
HouMhold Qoods/FumiturB 43 

Jawaliy 43A 

Lawn/e«rd«n 44 

Macallaneoui 45 

Medicel EqulfVSuppIbi 45A 

Musical IratrumenU 46 

P«ti i Supplies 47 

Tools & Machinery 48 

Wanted To Buy 40 



realestaub 



-CermUKyLjots ' 66 

naa^EttalaWutcKl 67 

RMlE«tal«Ml(C 68 

RBCREAinOSLIII, 

RMTMlIOMlVShlclM 70 

Snowmobl)a/AT\r> 71 

Bom/Ution/Etc 72 

Canping 73 

TraveWacailon 74 

$po<tt Equipment 75 

Akplanos 78 



Home* For Sale 
Homoe For Ront 


SO 
51 


TRAKSPOinCAnOST 


Horiw* Waned 


52 


CaraForSalo 60 


Homes Sultien 


53 


Rontalleasoa B1 


Condo/TowinHomea 


54 


Cl»tlc/Antlqu6 Com B2 


MobJkoMomai 


55 


SflrvioeA Parts 63 


Apaitmenta For Hunt 


56 


Cor Loana/lnauranca 84 


Apanments Wanted 


57 


V«u SS 


A^KAtarm To Sham 


58 


Trucka/Tratlera 86 


Roo(T» For Ram 


SQ 


Heavy Eqtiipiiwit 87 


BuilnMi Propony For Sato 


GO 


Motorcydea 88 


Butlrwi PropBfty For Rent 


61 


WantwJToBuy 30 


Fams 


62 




Vacant Lota/Acroao« 
ReAOftsA/acallon Rerrtala 


64 


SfitmCEUlUECTORY 


Out o< Aroa Propaily 


65 


Afpllanoea Hopalr 31 
eiaddop S3 



BuMen 

Caipentiy 

Caip«( OMmlng 

Concrota/CMTant 

DryWal 

EducatkxVltMtrucUon 

Electrical 

FkBWDOd 

Handynnn 

14eallngrAir CondltorJng 

HouuJweplng 

Landacaplne 

Laundry/Cleaning 

Legal Sefvlcaa 

Movlng/SlMaoa 

PakitJng/IDecofHtlng 

Pa/aLegaVTypIng Servicea 

Plurtjing 

PocM 

PR»*urs Wenhlng 

Protefrtlonal Gervtoa 

haidlo/TV Repair 

Remodel ng 

RacunM 

Rodino^ldlng 

Stoniflo 

TaxSecvtM 

Trces/Planla 

Waddhg 

MItcelaneout 



SS 
S7 
S8 

SO 
S10 
S11 
S13 

siaA 

S14 
SI 5 
516 
S17 
SlB 
-S21 
S23 
S25 
S2B 
S27 
S2B 
S30 
S31 
S33 
S3S 
S37 
S39 
541 
S43 
S45 
S47 
S4B 



Lakeland's Classified Ads appear in alt 14 newspapers with a 

Readership of over 200,000 



■ - ^~ NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Pl«»* chKk your ad on the FIRST lni«1lon daa. In lh« aveol o* an atrof or omiuloo. *• wil l» rwpontbla lor ONLY tha FIRST incorrea 
Insertion TTia n«fwp^»af wil be roeponaWa Iw only 1h« portiwi ot it>* ad that i« lr> eow. Pluse ootly tha ClaulW Dopartrwnt In the event ol an 
atTOr w«hln 1 waak o» run dala. CANCELLATIONS nwl be made prfof lo 5 p.m. on the Tuaaday bejoce pubtallwv .4_^..™. , 

Laketand Nawipapwi reaarvaa the right to property cJaaaWy al aAredWng. edk or deMe any obi«ilonabte wofding. or felecl any advortttemeni 

Aimolp Wartied adverthlng i» puWi«hed under un»led headings. L«»i«tand Nawwpapera doot not knowingly xc^ help wanted advertising thai in 
any way vtoUlet the Human Rights Act. 



Hours: Monday - Thursday 

e Ajyi. - 6 R.M. 

Friday 6 a.m. -6 P.M. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - Nooh 

DEADUNE: 

Wednesdays at 10 A.M. 



(708) 223^161 

Fax.: (708) 223-8810 




MasTcrCord 



Payment in advance ts required 
FOR these ads: 

• Adwrtisara out of Lakeland circulation a/aa 

• Buslneta Oppoitunklaa • Mobile Homea 

• Slualloni Wanted • DeM Otsdalmert 

• Qaraga and Moving Salsa* 

•Found and GWeaway Ads ato FREE 

Nopetswilba conaJdend for gtvoaway. 



< ■ 1 


1 ■ J. 


1 ■ ' 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Nowipaport 41 






!J I W!J4!- ! - ! !JWW!- ! W.H!iU ' |- l -|JW^^^^^ 



«»e»H«K»M 



i 



i-f- 









I: 

1* ■ 




in. 



EMPLOYMENT 



■itr.MtifimiMMitM^t^Aimtai!a- 




• ^ Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Tim© 



STUDENTS 

Here's a great opportunity for college and mature Wgh school 
students - learn the exciting field of 

TELEMARKETING 

l( you enjoy talking on the ptione. here's an excellent way to 
Wo oKar ^'*T'^ V^*"* P^^'P'^ skills and ma!<e money. 

•Pleasant Working Conditions 
•Flexible Parl-Tlmo Hours 
We Can Tailor To Your Needsf 
•Hourly wage plus commission 
. Call Nigel 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney 
Grayslake, IL 

(708) 223-8161 





We have immediate part time openings for 

TECHNICAL ASST. DESK 

7:30 r 1 :30 pm Daily 

8:1 5 - 5:00 pm Sat. 

Must be able to work Weekdays & Saturdays. 

CUSTOMER RELATIONS 

9:00 - 2:00 pm Daily 

STOCKROOM 

7:00 - 1 :00 Daily 

8:15 -5:00 Sat; 

fir 10:15 -7:00 Daily 

8:15- 5:00 Sat. 

Iinmediate employee discount. 

Call for appointment. 

SEARS SERVICE CENTERl 

1951 Waukegan Rd. Bannockburn, IL 

(708) 948-1540 

EOE M^ 



R.6.I.S. 
INVENTORY 

Is seeking part time 
inventory takers for 
the Lake County 
area. Paid training, 
flexible hours. 

For more 
Information call 

708-786-5342 

EOE 



COOK 

Expanding nursing 

home located in 

Long Grove has 

need of an additional 

part time cook. 

Therapeutic cooking 

experience helpful, 

but will train. 

Call Marta 
(708) 438-8275 



restaurant 

Lancer Cafe 

3 pm to 9 pm 
Monday thru Thursday 

THE COLLEGE OF 
LAKE COUNTY seeks 
someone, preferably with 
cashiering experience, to do 
cashiering, aeli prep, watr 
ing on customers, making 
pizzas and cleaning. 

COMPLETED applies 
tlon form must be submitted 
10 Personnel by July 9, 
1993. • 

FOR APPLICATION or 
more information, contact 
Personnel at 708/223-6601 
ext. 2216 (TDD # (or hear- 
ing Impaired Is 708/223- 
561 5J. COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COClNTY, 19351 W. 
Washington, Graystake, IL 
60030-1198 (a.a./e.o.e.; 
women and minorities 
encouraged to apply) 



Help Wanled 
Full -Time 





M]\M]\ 


M]\ 


J^J^Jm]\ 


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^ 



Entry level position fori 
Retail Route Driver, Must] 
be 21 with GOOD driving | 
record, Hard work, excel- 
lent pay and benefits. 
Requires CDL Class B| 
license within do days. 
Apply in person with Copy] 
of Driving Record, 

SPARKUNG SPRING 

I MINERAL WATER CO. I 

29841 Skokle Hwy. 

Lake Bluff, IL 
(708)578-7160 



Contact Your 

Classified Account 

Executive at 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
(708) 223-8161 . 




wFriendly 
^regular 

Sfinrnflt sf 



dly Atmosphere, 
pay raises, 



^profit sharing, heahh^ 
gins. 




^ Cages Lake RcL % 
g & Hwy. 45 I 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



HELP VVANTED: AUTO 
DEALER Office Manager. 
Dealership. Accounting 
experience required. Good 
compensation packages. AJ. 
LUCKETT Fo«Rlnooh -Mercury, 
Attn: Ron Murphee, Box 6-7, 
Effingham. IL 62401. 

DRIVERS, ATTENTIONI 
EXPERIENCED OTR Drtvers. 
CORE Canter Corp. Is expandng 
If te fleet with alt new oonventionaJ 
tractors. Immediate positions 
and new tractors available to 
top drivers. Call David 1/800- 
279-4402 for more details, 

COVENANT TRANSPORT 

EARN BIG BUCKS h a Covenart 
truck, our top team earned over 
$65,000.00 last year OTR dtfvefs 
you know the tiesi way to tnooase 
eamhgs Is to drtve vMi a growkig 
company. Nobody Is growing 
f asler than Covenant Transport 
We are expanding our 
conventtonals air rkle fleet, and 
we rwed drivers nowl If you are 
23yr.old with one year OTR 
experience and fiave a Class A 
CDL, with a H/M endorsement, 
and you are kiterested h earning 
top pay and benents CALL 1/800- 
441-4394. 

J.B.HUNT. OUR TOP Pay Is 
Bollom Una. Looking to fncteasa 
your famlt/s bottom line? Look 
Mo diving for JBHjnl, Amaitcafs 
most successful tranpo rial Ion 
cooparv. Youl earn the best psy 
on the road, exoeleft bonoAs and 
en|oy our pennanlly assigned 
equipment programs. Training 
Is avallabte. Call today for mora. 
Information. 1/800-368-8538 
JBIIUNT THE BEST RUN FOR 
THE M0NEY...E.O.EySubIecl 
to dnig screen. ' 

DRIVERS: TAKE YOUR PICK! 
Immediate OTR opportunities 
with several nalk)nwkle canters 
ottering choices of pay, 
equipmorH, home lime, twrief its. 
DSI Driver Placements No fees. 
1/800/826-7136. 

HEALTHY AND WEALTHY. Are 

you Interested In kising txxly fat, 
cholesterol concern, athletic 
perfonnance. 100% guaranteed 
Consularts needed patt-tlme, ful 
time. Call 1/800-741-3446. 

UCENSED UFE & Health Agent 
.needed. Quality products, high 
oormrts^oos wlh achranoe before 
Issue, lead system, and benefits. 
(Must quality for advances arxl 
benafHs) Call (1/800)252-2581 . 

LONG HAUL REFTIIGERATED 
CARRER seeking experienced 
qualified drivers. Newer 
oonvertftonals eqiipmeri, medkal 
Insurance available. 401K 
retireinent, safety bonus and 
also pakJ vacathins. Dubuque. 
1/800-962-8425. Bob. 

OWNER OPERATORS- 
MIDWEST. South, southeast. 
Home every 7-14 days, mitoage 
pay, bonuses, ptate/permlts, 
workers comp. paid. Rider 
Program, HEARTLAND 
EXPRESS, Inc. 800/441-4953. 

SALES/MANAGER TRAINEE. 
LOCAL employer Nring NOWl 
. 2^iUne sales. Manager, Trainee. 
Duties: Customer tialnhg- outskto 
sales !o kx:al clients. Complete 
service- $300 weekly during 
O.J,T. Family benefits, merit 
pronK)lk)ns. Qua)l1lcatk>ns: 21 + 
with car, bondable, amltious. 
Can 1/800-677-8406 9-7pm. Mr 
Murphy. EOE. 

DRIVERS- SHARKEY 

TRANSPORTAION, INC. has 
Immodlato openings lor long 
haul or short haul. Chotoe of dry 
van or refrigerated divisions. 
Percentage pay, full family 
Medcal, bonuses, regular twme 
lime and more. Call 1/800-395- 
9381 E,O.E. 



Expanding long term 

health care facility in 

Long Grove seeks a 

people oriented 

GENERAL 
OFFICE 

pcison for a variety of duties 
(Conr^Milcr skills not icquircd) 
Hours 9-5:30, Th-M 
Includes Weekends 

Call Pat At 

(708)438-8275 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Customer Service 
Inbound calls no sailing 

Lovo BwloeVliJali oi?er Calalw 
Co. Feaiuring quality bsby prod- 
uc)B neads FT/PT raps., order 
onlry experience hetplul. Good 
telocomrrwnlcailons skills a plu». 
Hero Is an oppty to grow w/young 
CO. Call Ann, TOa^t 5-21 10. 



SIDING 
APPLICATORS 

Eastern Nebraska 
1-800-927-7969 



SEEKING LAKE 
COUNTY JOBS? 

We can help I Permanent 
oniyl All typesi No temps. 

ACCURATE 

(708)244-2511 



AUTO CARE 

Jllly Lube Inc. is currently 
toeklng qualified candldales 
tor lt« Lobe Toctintelan posl- 
tlons. BenofllB are available 
Including an Insurance pack- 
age, paid vacation and holi- 
days, /^y In person al: 

JIFFY LUBE 

445 S. Milwaukee Ave. 
Uberlyvllle, (L 

An Equal Opponunty 
Etrptayor M/F 



TELEMARKETING 

Cash Paid Dally 

Start Today 

Will Train 

MANAGERS 

ALSO NEEDED 

Mundelein 

(708) 949-9240 




Round Lake 
Area Schools 

MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

Experienced with 
mechanical, electrical, 

plumbing and 
carpentry skills. Ability 

to read prints and 

diagnose trouble. Must 

be a team worker, 

Contact 

MnEdSauld 

Director of 

Support Services 

Round Lake 

Area Schools 

Diet #116 * 

811 Sunset 

Round Lake JL 60073 

(708)546-8913 



i^ ASSISTANT 
5 HOUSEKEEPER 
i SUPERVISOR 

2 Recently expanded, 
H^ long-term care 
1 facility, is looking for . 
g a working/housekeeper 

■ assistant supervisor. 

■ Supervisory 
Jexperience is a must. 
H Must be able to 

■ speak fluent English. 

S Call Pat: 

■ (708)438-8275 
B Monday-Friday 
■"9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 




Il 



Help Wanted 
FuII-Time 




Help Wanled 
. Fult-Timo 




Help Wanted 
' Full-Time 



AUTO PARTS 
MANAGER 

Ford exper.' Wages open. 
Call or send resume to: Jerry 
Fiedler, FIEDLER FORD, 
Granisburg.Wl 54840. 

715-463-5367 



SIGN 
PAINTER 

Wanted to paint billboards 
In beautiful Lancaster 
County, PA. 

717-293-9331 



Traval .. •-, ^ - 

*CnUlSE LINES 
NOW HIRING* 

Turn 7our dreams Into' realHvL 
1300-$goO/wKly salary. Apply 
In all dlvfalons, Fult-llme or 
taaional. Free room, meals, 
uniforms A morel Hawaii- 
Caribbean-Bahamas. Call 
407-774-44U, ciL C-3313 



HANDWORKERS 

Exper'd structure granite 
handworker lor company 
based in Madison, Wt. S§-t\b 
depending on exper. Please 
send resume to: Personnel, 
Quarra Stone Co., Inc. 4301 
Robertson Rd. Madison. Wl 
53174. Wo are an Equal 
Opportunity Employer. 



SERVICE TECH 

QuBltlled, with at least 2 yrs exp. 
in commercial refrigeration, AC & 
relrigerallon installation. Contact: 
Mabry & Haynss Construction 
Co., 1700 McFarland 400 Dr., 
A}pliarella,GA 30201. 

404-475-8455 



CHEMICAL 
OPERATOR 

Lubricant co. has open 
ings on 2nd stxift for expe- 
rienced batch processor. 
CatI Bob, Mon.-Fri, 
815-459-1250 



ASSISTANT 
HOUSEKEEPER 

Must be able to work weeltends & 
holidays. Bl-llngual preferred. 
Nan>Bmoking posRlon. 

ROOM ATTENDANTS 

Ful & pan time. Must be able to 
work weekends & holidays. Apply 
in person: 

ADVENTURE INN 

3732 Grand Ave. 
Gurnoe - 



SERVICE 
TECHNICIAN 

Northwest MN manufacturing oo. Is 
seeking applicants for a service 
technician for CNC machining 
equipment. Must have exper. In 
CNC etedronlc & olectrtcal mainle- 
nanoe & repair. Mechanical exper. 
is also prefd. Wagee & beni. nega 
& dependent upon quaillicallons. 
Subnet resumes to: Dee, Inc. P.O. 
Box 6Z7, Craokslon, MN 66716. 

218-281-5811 

EOE 



Mundelein 

OFFICE 

TELEMARKETERS 

wanted to sat 

appointments for 

our sales personnel 

Please Calf 
(708)949-8222 



Automotive 

CAR PORTER 

Busy Lake Co. new car 
dealership has an imme- 
diate opening for a 
Porter to clean c^s, prep 
deliveries, and perform 
general lot maintenance 
duties. Full time days. 
Must have valid IL 
Drivers License. 

Potentiat for overtime. 

Contact Mr. Barnes at: 

708-526-5541 



/ 



CUSTODIANS 

Local CGntrador has full 
time second shlH posi- 
tions av^lablc for men 
and Women In 
Grayslake, Vernon Hills, 
Gumec, Lake Forest, 
Lake BluIT. Rlvcrwoods, 
Unoolruhlrc. 

For Information 
Caff betwe&i 6pm • 8pm 

(708) 675-6000 



^ 



6EDMAKER 

needed. 
Call Mary Reel 

TOWN HALL 
ESTATES 

(708) 526-5551 



^^^^g^^^^^^ 



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SSE3a^S!S£SffiS®SS!SaiSaSS33s!5SSa£S^5 



MEDICAL OPPORTUNITIES 



DENTIST 

Qanenl practica dentist wsntftd as 
lull time employss at an establnhad 
faderally funded practice. Salary, 
full bans.. & malpracllce insur. 
provided. 36 hra, wk. & some on- 
catl r«fd. Communrty health center 
loc'd In northern Oconto County, 
the heart ot the Nlcojat NaUonal 
Forast. For Into. 716-276-6321. MN 



Medical 

Opportunities 

Winchester House 

CNA'S 

All shttls, $6.g8/hour, 40e 
3hl(t diderentlal ana 65e 
weeltend dlflorenilal. 

Must be available oallend 
orientation: July 12 & 13, and 
July 2G&27, 1993. Submit 
applications (o: 

Jim Adama 

Personnel Manager 

1125 N. Mjlwaukn Ave. 

Ubertyville,IL 60048 

Equal Opportunity 

Employer 



Expanding 
skilled/intermediate 
care fadlit/ located, 
in Long Grove has 

need of CNA'S 
Good Benefits/Salary 
CaUSuzyM'F 

(708)438-8275 



Expanding long 
term iiealth 

care facility in 
Long Grove 
has need of 

REHAB 
AIDE 

Full Time 
Competitive Salary 

Call Katliy 
(708)438-8275 



i>iREei 

iM<;iiT 
siiiinr 

(9 p.m. -6 a.m.) 

Must include weekends 

Work with 

severely and 

profoundly 

mentally retarded 

women. Contact ; 

Sister Arlene 

Mount St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiii 

Immediate 
opentngs for 

Direct 

Care 

Workers 

Weekend hours only 
; PartTtme 
Willing to train for 
positions 

Call Sister Arlene 

(708) 438-5050 
MOUNT ST. 

JOSEPH'S 

Lake Zurich 






^ Inmwdlate ^ 
Q Opening for q 

g RESIDENTIAL g 
c SERVICE a 

BccX)rdinatorS 

g Full-Time position to^ 
I] work with mQntatly a 
retarded women. ^ 
ICF/DD a 



D 
D 
D 



D Please contact: n 



n 

D 
D 
D 

n 

D 
D 
D 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



Immediate Opening 

for • 

Master Level 



SOCIAL 
WORKER 

for158bodlCF/DD.racility. 

Contact Sister 
Arlene 

(708) 438-5050 

Mount St Joseph 

Lake Zurich JL 



Expanding long term 
care facility in 

Long Grove 

has need of 

Full Time 

RN & LPN 

all shifts plus pool 

Excellent benefits 

Competitive salary 

Call Nancy 

(708)438-8275 

f\/lon-Frl, 9-5 



Cathy Netting 

Mount St. 

Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

g (708) 438-50503 

BBQsayBByiasB 

Immediate Part- 
Time opening 

11:30 am -8 pm 
and Saturday 

Contact 

Sister Mary 

D.O.N. 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(708)438-5050 

Lake Zurich 

Inactive or Retired 
^gNurses Welcome 2 



Lakeland Classifieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



42 Lakeland Nowspapers 



Friday, July 2, 1993 




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irich 3 

-5050 g 

yyayn 

pi\r 

aPart- 
ening 
-8 pm 
Lirday 

act 

Mary 

.N, 

jnt 
jseph 

)8-5050 

Zurich 

jr Retired 
Welcome 






EMPLOYMENT 



[l_ HefpWanlod. 
Full-Time 



l^tf? Help Wanted 
Fdl-Timo. 



aaa^rfaa-tii-B 



-? srsMSWsaoDflflSffli&aBQittiiSQMa 




Relp Wanted 
Full-Ttme 




Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmo 



Desk Top 
Publishing 

Local printing firm 
Ipoking for a full time 
person with desktop 
capabilities X6 work 
our 2nd shift. Must 
have experience with 
Pagemaker. 

Phone Ruth 

(708)244-7161 

8:00am. •4:30 pm 



■^Sp^^BS!"- 






remporaiy 

Summei Help 

Wanted 

Maintenance person 
needed for .Apt. 
Complex in Vernon 
IHills. Some knowledge 
of maintenance (or 
Apt. turnovers. Basic 
skills include cleaning 
apts., work orders on 
maintenance, tiling 
floors, shampooing 
carpets, some plumb- 
ing and electrical help- 
ful. M-F 8:00-5:00 . 

For Interview Call 
(708)367-4505 



Adminlslrallon 



PROGRAM SPECIALIST 



JThe Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad 
Corporatlon/Metra, the Cofporation responsible for, 

I commuter rail activities In Northeastern Illinois, is 
cunently seeking a qualified candidate to fill an 
Immediate vacancy for a Program Specialist. 

Responsitile for the development and production of 
mandated federal, state and local governmental 
reports. Also responsible for the administration, 
coordination; and trouble-shooting of the depart- 
ment LAN's system. Develop and maintain project 
Implementation schedules on Primavera, and project 
database files. 

B.S. in Accounting or Rnance, or equivalent work 
experience with a background of at (east two years of 
financial analysis. Requires experience In PC and 
network operating systems, with 2 years working 
knowledge of spreadsheet, database and project 
management applications. 

Position provides excellent compensation and ben- 
efits. Please send resume including salary history 
and requirements to: . 



etra 



Director, Office of Employment 
547 West Jackson • Chicago, IL 60661 
EEO M/F 



9 f >A^ TELEMflRKETINO :^ 

With a smile In your voice! Pface outgoing calls 
- to corporations. Full or Part time, days or 
X • evenings. Room for growth. -ii^ 

(708) 244-0016 SuperiorE^o„„L 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Q: Dear...Scan:h: Back in April I started a job wiih ihc (ruunc 
withheld) company. It was a job I liked, and siartcd lo make 
friends almost immediately. On my ihird week with ihc 
company, a friend of mine out of suic Iwcame ill and I offered 
to go and help care for her. I told the company that I needed a 
leave of absence for personal reasons and ihey told mc to give 
ihcm a call when I got back in town. Well. 1 relumed six weeks 
later and contacU;d them informing ihcm that I was ready lo 
come back lo work. They responded by telling mc thai I no 
longer had a job with ihcm. They lold mc to call when I 
returned and now will noi give me my job back. They claim that 
I walked off and abandoned my job after 13 days of 
employment They have also infomicd mc thai I am ineligible 
for Unemployment Compensation. I thought thai a company 
had to comply with the new law staling that an employee is 
eligible for a leave of absence lo care for a sick person or 
newborn. What's the story? II.V. - Libcnyville. 

A; Dear H.V. Unfortunately for you, your fomicr employer is 
100% correct in his actions. The words "call us when you gel 
back in town" do not uanslatc into "your job is here for you 
when you return". He has a business lo run with or without you. 
Leaving your employment to care for a sick friend was strictly 
your decision ana holds nothing in your favor after 13 days of 
cmpIoymcnL One is not eligible for uncmplojincni benefits in 
Ihis siiuadon either. Let mc help set ihc laws on medical leave 
straight and get you back on the road to cmploymenL 

Businesses within the U.S. who employ 50 or more persons 
must provide: up lo 12 weeks of unpaid leave if the following 
situations occur. One: the birth of an employee's child, or the 
placcmcni of a child within the employee's home cither foster or 
adopted. Two: to lake care of one's self, spouse, parent or child 
widi a serious health condition. Keep in mind that an employer 
must guarantee the employee to return to a position ctjuivalenl 
to the one they had before ihc leave. There arc criicrias, 
however, for an employee lo be eligible for this "leave": they 
musi be employed with the company for no less than 12 nrtonths 
and have worked a minimum of 1250 hours before the "leave" 
lakes place'. While this law is scheduled to go into effect, there 
are provisions which may yet- be made to strengthen the 
employer's ability to regulate this. The Family & Medical Leave 
Act of 1993 is whal it is referred to,- and is scheduled lo go into 
effect on August 5, 1993, and specific rules will be announced 
on that date. 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior I'crsonncl in Gurncc. 
Letters can be sent lo Nancy at 5101 Washington St, . 
Gumcc.lL 60031. 



Now Accepting Applications For 

PRODuciiojir 

WORKERS 

TprXstSiZnASMStB 

Full Company Benefits 

Apply In Penon 8 a.m. to 5 p.ml 

NU-WAY SPEAKER PRODUCTS 
945 Anita AntiochJL 

Equal Oppoftuntty Einptoyer 



Fremont School District #79 

HeamLCkrk 

Duties Include: Administering medication to tuidcnu 
- NCnor fint mid 

Light oQicewoik . - 

' Qualincatloni: Excdleni pooplo ikilli and willingnot to woik 
wiih children 
Fim Aid Ceitification 

SUrllng Date; A^K^t 23, 1993 

Hours: - 7:30-3^Mondiy-Riday(w4)enRchoclutnKnion) 

This pociticm is • 9 monih pocidon. 

Salary and BcnelTts: To he determined . 

Secretary to the A.ssistant Principal 

. Dulles Include: Typing. rBccptioa, filing, ind other oinceduiin 
.Coorduuiing die onice of Siudau Scivicci ' 

. Qualincatloiis: Excdlcnlpa^lesldUsand wiUingncsstowodc 
,-. with chUdicn 
■ Computer experience desinble ,' - 

Starting Date: August 2. 1 993 

Hours: . 7;30-3:30 

This is ■ 12 monih poiiiion. 

SiUry and DencniJt To be detcniiined . 

[f you are inteicsted,' pleue call Guy Mica!, Superiniendent School 
District #79 in writing on or before July 16, 1993. 

28855 N. Fremont Center Rd. 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

(708)566-0168 



Garage 



Dior 
Openers Installers 

Immediate openings for the right 
candidate with good mechanical 
skills & background. Will be trav- 
eling a wide area of Northern IL. 
Must have own transportation. 
Daytime hours, immediate 
employee discount. Mileage 
reimbursed plus benefits. 
Send Resume ATT: PERSONNEL 

SEARS SERVICE CENTER 

1 951 Waukegan Rd. Bannockburn, IL 6001 5 

(708)948-1540 

EOEM/F 



MUNDELEIN 

fHijH ScHooC 

is seeking persons to fill several positions 
Guidance Office Secretary 

9 month position 

7:30 a.m. -4:00 p.m. 

Excellent typing and computer skills required 

ESL Registrar/Counselor/ . 
Evening Supervisor 

. Experfence and BA degree preferred - 
No phone calls. Send application letter and resume 
to Mundetein High School c/o Mrs. Dorothy Ford 

Media Center Secretary 

9 month position 

7:30 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. 

Computer skills and experience working with students 

Hall Monitor/Dean's Assistant 

7:45 a.m. - 3:45 p.m. 
on days when school is in session 

Career Resource Center Secretary 

9 month position, 4 hours per day 
Good typing & telephone skills required 

Applications available at 
Mundelein High School 

1350W. HawleySt. 
Mundelein, IL 60060 




m Help Wanted 
FuikTnn©. 




|H He^ Wanted 
Full-Ttmo : 




Help Wanted 
- Fidl-time 



BIRCHWOOD TRANSPORT INC. 

IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR 

PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVERS FOR 

OUR OVER-THE-ROAD LOCAL DIVISIONS 



IF YOU: 



WE 
OFFER: 



APPLY 
AT: 



ARE HONEST AND DEPENDABLE 
HAVE A COMMERCIAL DRIVERS UCENCE 
CAN PASS A DOT DRUQ SCREEN/PHYSICAL 
HAVE OVEn 1 YEAR EXPERIENCE 

MILAGE PAID OFF OF HUB 

STOP PAY 

VISION AND HEALTH INSURACE 

SAFETYBONUS 

HOME ON A REGULAR BASIS 

BIRCHWOOD TRANSPORT INC. 
3111 1S2ND AV KENOSHA Wl 
MON-FRI8AM-4PM 

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 



Grant High 
School 

is accepting 
applications for 
the. position of 

BUSDRIVER 

Applications may 
be obtained at 

Grant High School 

285 E. Grand Ave. 
Fox Lake, IL 

From 8 am to U am 
A Commercial 
Drivers license 

and experience is. 
necessary 



Shop For A New Car 

Turn To The Lakeland Classifieds! 



Do you enjoy variety? Do you enjoy a 
challenge? DoyoUthflue in a fast 
paced, dynamic environment? If so. you 
could be the person we're lookUigforl 

Lakeland Newspapers Is seeking the right 
person to Join our exciting Sales 
Department. You will be a success if you 
possess good organizational skills, com- 
munication skills, and are self motivated. 
If you are looking for a rewarding career. 
Investigate this position today! 

Please send resume to 
Attn: Ann Roberts 

Lakeland Newspapers 

EO. Box 268 

Grayslalte, IL 60030 

Fax:(708)223-8810 
Plione: (708) 223-8161 




WE ARE NOW 

ACCEPTING 

APPLICATIONS FOR 

PART-TIME 
CASHIERS 

EVENINGS and WEEKENDS 

atourMUNDELQN& 

GURNEE STORES 

WEOFFER: 
A pleasant working 
atmosphere, along with 
competitive wages and 
the opportunity for 
advancement. 
APPLY IN PERSON 
ASK FOR MANAGER 

AiiCE 

Hardware 

609 E. Hawley St 

Mundelein, IL 

or 

Rt 21 & Grand Ave. 

Gumee, IL 




EXPLORE THE MOUNTAIN! 



GANDER MOUNTAIN HAS OPENINGS 
IN THE FOLLOWING DEPARTMENTS: 

WAREHOUSE OPERATIONS: 

PICKING - Full-time 1st shift. Mon.-Fri., 7 am -3:30 pm. Select mer- 
chandise to fill our customer orders. 
PACKING - Full-time 1st shift. Mon.-Fri., 8 am - 4:30 pm. Packing 
the products after reviewing the customers' orders. 

INBOUND TELEPHONE SALES: 

We are looking for enthusiastic people with basic typing 

or keyboard knowledge and good oral communication 

skills to take customer orders during our busy season. If 

you are people oriented and have good problem solving 

abilities, we offer a variety of flexible schedules plus 

incentive pay on phone specials. 

ENJOY OUR GREAT BENEFITS 

(Many apply to part-time, also) 

-Paid vacations •Disability pay 

•Life insurance •l\/1edical insurance 

•Dental insurance ^Pald tiolidays 

•Merchandise Discount ^Education assistance 

•401 K savings plan •Sicic pay 

•Pay for performance •Employee assistance program 

PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON 

Our Personnel Office is open: Mon.-Fri., 7 am - 5 pm 

P.O. Box 1 28, Hwy. W, Wilmot. Wl 531 92 



(l^Qoulkllloi^^ 



J 



KC. 



Hwy.W, 12400 Fox River Rd., Wilmot, Wl 53192 

Equal Opporlunlly Employnr WFItiN 



n 






f, July 2, 1993 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 43 



'i 

r. 
i ' 



I. 



-.'.:.:{ - 1 



EMPLOYMENT 




?.ssv.-.vvsv^-:->.vwi-:s<vvi-;v.v.v-j;-i^wi.w^v:-:<.v--.^^^^ 



■'■•■'■•"■'••-•■•■'-•-•-• 




I H Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




I ■ Help Wanted 
. Full-Time 



BEMOS 

We have immediate part time openings for 

Lawn & Garden 
Technicians 

Heating & lUr Condition 
Teciinicians 

Must be able to worl< weekdays & 

Saturdays. Immediate employee 

discount. Call for appointment. 

SEARS SERVICE CENTER 

1951 Waukegan Rd. Bannockburn, IL 

(708)948-1540 



EOEM/F 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Superintendent of 

Parks & Maintenance 

FOSS PARK DISTRICT 

Resppnsibia for maintenance of 9II grounds, 
properties, vehicles and equipment witiiin ttie 
district (excluding the golf course). 

High school diploma or GED required. B.S. 
in parks management, horticulture, forestry 
preferred. Minimum of (2) years maintenance 
experience. Valid Illinois drivers license. 
Operators license in pesticides. 

Resumes mail to: 

FOSS PARK DISTRICT 

1730 Lewis Avenue 
North Chicago, IL 60064 

Resumes/Application Deadline 
July 30, 1993 at 5:00 p.m. 



adterhsikg s 



argest weekly I 



l^ketand Newspapefs, Lake Count/s largest ' 
newspaper group, is saekirig an Advertising Acxount 
Executive. The cancSdate will t)o responsible for fiekj 
sales calls, developing a key area in Lake County 
■ and must possess excellent sMIls in Interpersonal 
communkation, creativi> and personal responsibility. 
The cancSdate must also be self motivated and able 
to work with minimal amount of superviston, enjoy 
variety and be abte to hande multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile Is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professkmal, energetic and pos- 
sess al of the above charactafistics we are interest- 
ed in talking to you. A candkiate shouM have previ- 
ous sales experience. Please send resume or call: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers . 

80 S. Whitney St. 

Gmyslake, IL 60030 

(708)223-8161 



JOB FAIR 

Holiday Inn 

July 10th, 1993 

10 am -3:30 pm 

CLERICAL SUPPORT -P/T 

PARTS/STOCKROOM - PA" 

LAWN & GARDEN TECHNICIANS -FfT 

HEAT & AIR TECHNICIANS -F^ 

Immediate Openings - 

Employee Discount with Full 

Benefits for F/T positions. 

Must worl< weekdays & Saturdays 




1951 Waukegan Rd. Bannockburn, IL 
(708)948-1540 



EOEM/F 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




I 



TELEPHONE SALES 
MANAGER 

Experienced full-time sales manager. Must 
be flexible in hours. Salary position with full 
benefits. Taking applications immediately. 

Call 
SEARS SERVICE CENTER 

(708)948-1540 



EOE M/F 



Order Packers 
Libertyville Area 

Long and short term 
temporary assign- 
ments avail. Qualified 
applicants must pos- 
sess good reading 
skills & basic math 
skills. 

Excellent starting 
pay rate and 
opportunity for 

overtime! 
Call Today 

KEUY 

Temporary Services 

(708)367-1140 

EOEM/F/H 




Child Care 



GURNEE- (GRANDWOOD 
PARK) Mom avalableto cam for 
yourchild In my honw, beginning 
July 16> NorvsnuMng househotd, 
lencdd-ln yard, snacks/meals 
Included, Call Leslie (708) 
356-9^46. ' 

LOOKING FOR SITTER. 
Childcare needed for ages 4,3 
&awlcs. oh as-needed'basis. 
Reltabte. Must have relerences. 
WMvmod area (706)548-2231. 







Business 
Opportunities 



AG DtSTRlBUTORS/ DEALERS 
WANTED: GreenwOfW Products 
Coip. Foiar Follzets - Made from 
fish and seavwed. More Bushots 
at a lower cost. Credit check 
required. Call 612-343-0933. 

TANNING- ALISUN & WOLFF 
TANNING BEDS, New 
■commoiclaHiome units. From 
$199.00, Lamps- Lotions- 
Accessories, Morthly payments 
\ow as $18.00. Call today Free 
n«w color calak>g. 1/800-462- 
9197. 

.WOULD YOU LIKE TO MAKE 
$1,000 $$$ without working? 
Unlike anything you have ever 
seen advertised or heard of. 
FREE Reporll Send SJV.S.E. 
Envekjpo to: B.WrigN Enterprise, 
107 E. Grand Ave., Fax Laite, IL 
60020. 



MATURE PERSON TO Care 

for 4/chfldneo, SAJays week, In my 
WOdwood home. $35/day.'(706) 
223-4492. after 6pm. 

SITTER AVAILABLE. WILL 
watch your dilkl full time only. In 
my McHemy home. Toys! Fenced 
yard. Meals frKtuded. Ftrst-aki 
and CPR knowledgable. For 
hfonnadlon.cal Katly, (815)344- 
7823. ,- " ' 

SUMMER CHILD CARE 
WANTED: In my Wauconda 
home, next to beach and park. 
S/days aweek, 3Jt>oys (1 1 ,7&5). 

(708) 520-1878. 

WTLDWOOO MOTHER WOULD 
kwe to tiabysll your toddler 3- 
4days a week, excellent 
refercncas. (708) 223-7495. 

WILL DO BABYSITTING for all 
ages, anytime. Also overnight 
ar>d hoHdays. CreallVB activities. 
Meals and snacks Included. 
(708)546-3718 or (708)740- 
4414. 

WINTHROP HARBOR MOM 
will babysit for companion 
betwwen 7&1 1 . Hours and rates 
negotiable. Call Sue (708) 
872-3942. ' 

INTERVIEWING WOMEN IN 

Graysiate, to walch iry 2<hUen, 
while I attend CLC Mon+Frl 
nrwmlngs. Call (708) 949-5929. 




Work Wanted 



HOUSECLEANNa I WLL doan 
your house OR apartment at 
leasonabto rales in Central Lake 
County area. Releroncos 
available. Call Baib anyllme, 
(708)223-7401. 

UCENSED BEAUTICIAN ABLE 
10 do hair In your home. Ask lor 
Irene (815)675-2893. 




wmnwrwrff^vrvfrvmw^rymrfrminyfniimrrwrm 



MARKET GUIDE 




I 



Antiques 



^ ■al^ l ^ i lLl^ | |m l ^lWJ^m^JiJMI^lJli^^U!L ! Ml^^^ 



MARKET GUIDE 



"*'*'^*^>^^*^'*^^™^*'*'*'*^''^^ 




Bazaars/Crafts 



KNrmNQ MACHINE, KNIT a 

summer sweater this weekendl 
Brother punch card machine 
w/ribber, accessories. 2 years. 
$60Q^hegotlE<})e. (312) 296^6236. 





Business/Offjca 
■ Equipment 



DESKS-LARGE SELECTION 

OF quality used of1k» lunntturo; 
chairs, tables, wali panels, 
computer lumlturo and mucti 
more. B4L Office FumMurBillOl 
60th St., Kenosha. WI 53140. 
Phone (414) 656-1717. 

LASER FAOSIMILE MACHINE. 
Shaip 3300, Plain Paper FAX 
machine. Top quality laser 
provides camera-ready, 
reproduceablo copy that 
automallcaDy reduces/enlarges. 
Perfect lor graphics, forms, 
indepth detailed proposals. . lyr 
old. mint, with all BELLS and 
WHISTLES. Will sell for $800. 
(Retail $2,200.) Call Sharon or 
Bob at (708) 223-6161. 

SECRETARIAL WORK 
STATWN, (kafUng table, Minola 
copier. EP4S02, TIE 820 Multl 
tmnk phone system with 15- 
phonos. NEC letter qualty printer 
with stand. (708) 234-8534. 

SMALL BUSINESS- 

ATTENTION! Phone system. 
(lO)lO-llno Stromberg phones, 
K.S.U. with call waiting, and 
more. $500. and misc. office 
(umlture. (708) 918-71 27. 




ChQd Care 



CHILD CARE- IN my Zkm home 

on 20lh SIreet, oxperloncod. 
dean f»mo. Will give your child 
toving care. (708) 746-5650. 

DAYCARE PROVIDER 
NEEDED FOR 4/month Old, 
beginning end of August, In your 
home, GrayslakeA/emon Hills 
area. Can (708) 223-7463. 

MONDAY MORNING MOM'S 
OFPEf^ Reliable qually care for 
Infants- Preschoolers, Insured 
monltorod, (708) 497-#MOM 
(4666). 

PRESCHOOL TEACHERflWOM 
HAS childcare openings In her 
Fox Lake home. Meats Induded. 
Planted adhtlae. (706)e7a-154Z 

RELIABLE LOVING PERSON 

to care tor my Infant 3-day3 per/ 
week. In my Vomon Hills homo. 
(708) 660-6379. 

RESPONSIBLE TEENAGER 
WILL BABYSrr In your homo, 
Mon-Frl. Anttoch area. (708) 
B36-3994. 




Appliances 



44 Lakoiand Newipap«rs 



^■ii.M,5>,^ij^;-^ji 



■faSti.- 




Oectronics/ 
ComputBrs 



IBM PC HOME computer, 
complete, games, elc„ VGA 
color monitor. $600. (708) 
740-1880. 

TELEPHONE SYSTEM- 
TRILUUM Panther 1032. Gives 
print-out of datfy call activity. 
Indudes 4-phone3, pdnter, Meico 
monitoring unit. $2,300 Call 
(708)526*5633, leave message. 




Fami Guide 



BACKHOE- TRACK MOUNTED, 
P&H Model 750, Dotrott 4-53, 
$9.000.(708)587-5088. 

HAY BAYLER, RAKE, haybhe. 
mower and crimper, bale throw 
box complete, cuhtvator rotary, 
hoe, sprayer, com planter, drlD 
and other equipment. (414) 
B72-2295. ^ 

HORSES BOARDED- 

$195/MONTH, Includes dally 
turnout and tml access, largo box 
stalls in Spring Grove. Lessons 
also available. (708) 395-^863. 




Garage/ 
Rummage Sales 



(2)ANTIQUE JOHNSON 
MOTORS, 192S and 1929; 
7-1/2hp, Elgin, All 3fo»$1,200. 
Flintlock pistol, antique, made 
hi IflOO^, $1 ,200 (708) 587-0572 
J.Wonzel. 

ANTIQUES AND 

COLLECTIBLES WANTED. 
JEWELRY. CLOCKS, 

GLASSWARE, POTTERY, 
TOYS, DOLLS and FURNfR/RE. 
Top Prices paid. (708) 872-9808. 

BEDROOM SET, 7-DRAWER 
dresser with mirror, 4-drawer 
chest dressor, bookcase 
hoadmaid, excellent condltton, 
$650. (early 1960's). (414)694- 
5979. 

HEKMAN 4-POSTER 

MAHOGANY Canopy bod, King- 
size, mahogany, triple dressor. 
toathertop^aotd leaf, hlglvboy, 2- 
end tables, $5,000. ALSO, 
'Foderal* couch, 1890's, 
Mahogany, Good condUon, $300. 
(708) 918-7127. 



Good Things 
toEal . . 






Deep Lake Road 
Berry Farm 

OrganlcGrown 

SIRASVBERRIES 

at $1;85 per quart 
Ready Picked 

(708)395^235 



ALL HOUSEHOLD GOODS; 
washers, (kyera, refrtgeratorand 
fumtturo. Used, good condnk)n. 
Paymert arrangemonts avalaUo. 
923 (iOOnwood(708) 263-3772. 



SEMI ANNUAL 

STOREWIDE 

1/2 PRICE 



TIT 



Nothing held back/ 
ONE MORE TIME 

236 Center St. 
Grayslake, IL 

(708) 223-4433 




Horses & 
■Tack 



300-HOME SUBDIVISION 
ANNUAL GARAGE SALE. IN 
LAKE ZUnCH/ Chestnut Comets 
Subdivlson. Quentln Rd and 
Pheasant Ridge. South of R122, 
north of Rt.12. July 9,10,11; 
9am-4pm. ■. 

AFTER YOUR BIG Sale, and 
you still have things that just 
did not go.... Call LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It under 
the "FHEE/Ghfwwrays" section, 
at No Chargei (708)223-8161. 

HARVARD BARN SALE/ 

ANTIQUES. Fumiluro, dishes, 
tools, much MISC. Womens 
clothing, size 10-12. JULY 4lh 
WEEKEND. SaI,Sun, ^4on. 8am- 
Bpm7418 GaHleW Rd. Harvard, 
(last house on Garfield north 
going out town near Rt.14, next 
to St. Paul's Lulheran Church.) 

HOUSEHOLD SALE- 27707 
LAKE SHORE DR.. oil Grass 
Lake Rd., Spring Grove. Sat. 
9am-3pm (7/3). sleeper couch, 
recllner, couch & rocker, crafts, 
dishes, organ, dishwashers, 
$75/E»cti; saKx)aL Antique kichen 
hutch, end tables. (708)587- 
0637. __^__ 

SALE)- SATURDAY- JULY 3ni. 
6am*3pm. 262 Seymour, 
Graysluko (l/2block north ol 
R1e.120) Plnt^poog tabto. do(he<' 
oscUtiscope and much MOREl 
(708) 548-1403. 




Households/ 
FumHure 




Lawn/Garden 




Households/' 
Furniture 



ARABIAN 6 YEAR-OLD reg 

gray gekfng, 15H, level headed, 
sound, good home vety hportant, 
$1.800.(414)279-3229. 

GORGEOUS BAY 

THOROUGHBRED (ELDING, 
fiyrotd, very athletic, 
hurter4umpef,w1ldo4n.couise, : 
1st level dness^, $5,500 (414) 
637-6933. 

HORSES BOARDED- 

$19SnM0NTH, Includes dally 
turnout and tral access, laigo box 
stalls In Spririg Grove. Ijossons 
also available. (708) 395^663. 

LARGE FLASHY PqNY 54lnch 
Gekf ng, rides arxJ drives, single 
and double. Road safe, large 
enough for adult needs 
Interrrwdlafe handler, 12yrs.okJ. 
(708)223- PONY. 

SAMOYED PUPPIES AKC- 
tMautlful white fluffy coats, shots 
and VKXtned, famlV raised, $1^- 
$200.(815)948-2001. 

TRAILER WANTED: HORSE 

or Stock. Bunper or Gooseneck. 
Any condition. Also looking for 
Trail Horse. CASHI (414) 
693-8048. 



(2)WINDOW AIR 

CONDITIONERS, $50. Both in 
gOod working condition. (Air- 
Sweet /Frige daie) After 5pm 
(708)S4&-1324. 

PILLOW BACK COUCH. 

kiveseat, chair. 3-plece living 
room set. 3 years okf . ExceDont 
conojlkxi. $^0. (708) 949-7591 ■ 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bettoom, 

complete $1 ,100 Dining room 
set, $1 ,700 Cheny. All in perfect 
condllton. Must Selll (708)e5&- 

0611. 

QUEEN SrZE WATER8ED. lul 

headboard with shelves and 
minor with lights on each sMe. 
GKlrawer?, each side ol bed, 
good oondnion. Between oam- 
9pm (706) 705-€B31. ' 

SOFA, PLEXSTEEU SOINCH, 
soft white, $525. Excellent 
concfltlon, like new. (414)694- 
5979. 

WINDOW AIR CONDmONER, 

Carrier, S.OOOBTU, New 8/88 
(4-summers of use) Excellent 
condition, best offer. 
(708)949-^434, 



BLUE SOFA AM) UDVESEA^ 
good condltbn, $300/set Med 
size desk and chair, $75. Double 
bed oonptok), $30a Oakodagon 
comer table w/doofs $50. (708) 
26^-7909. 

QUEEN^StZE MATTRESS AND 

box spring, brand new, never 
used. $260. Brass Queen 
head/footboard with porceleln 
knobs, $190. Never Used queen 
firm mattress set, .$260. 
DELIVERY AVAILABLE. 
(708)374-0203. 

CHERRY OAK DINlNQ room 
set with S/chairs, china cabinet. 
Wen taken care ol. $3,500A}e8t 
(708)249-5830. 

DINING ROOM, QUEEN Anne, 
Exquisite Chenywood, 9-plece, 
Ported $1,995. Sender available. 
Never Used 3-plece chenywood 
wan entertainment center, $900. 
(708)374-0203. 

EASY CHAIR, SOFA, and 
Loveseat, Blue, mauve, and 
cream. Excellent condllkxi, tnust 
sen. $550. (708)855.9047. 

EVERYTHINQ MUST GO t HUa- 

a -bed sc(a and malcttig Iveseef, 
$325, Kthchen table and ciialrB, 
$125. 2 brass lamps and en 
tables, $50. (708)223-5635. 

FOR SALE- LOVESEAT, light 
blue, excelkint condition, $200. 
(708)735-8114. leave message. 

HYDRAULIC LIFT CHAIR. 
Perllck Party Tap, king size 
wataibed set, electric typewriter, 
convection oven, arxl MORE. 
(414) 652-3857. 501S-67th St. 
Kenosha. 

IF YOU'RE LOOKING lor 

somethtng unique walnut and 
cane Dvtng room set, 2-couches, 
2/matchkig chairs. $750. (706) 
546-8773. 

MITSUBISHI 2SINCH COLOR 
cable ready TV+ Quasar VCR. 
Excellent condition. $500 for 
both. Slmplk:lty llhp se-tnch 
cut w/lhatcher. ExoBlenl oorxllon 
$^0716 CrestvlawDr. bi^asida. 
(708) 587-5072. 

MUSTSELLI COFFEE TABLE, 
good condition, $26: Laminated 
wood, entertainment center, 
exceBant. $100; (706) 2^-1435. 

PIANO, $500; CHlfJA Cabkiet, 

$700; Hlde-a-bod $200; 
washer/dryer $50/8eL (708) 
546-5223. 

SOFAISLEEPER QUEENSIZE,* 
EXCELLENT oondUon, TracMon 
styling, $175. (708) 660-1552. 

VCR, $60. VCR Stereo4-hoads, 
$120; lOinch CohirTV. $60 ALL 
WDrit great. (708) 546^ 320. 



43A 


Jewelry 



MARQUIS DIAMOND 

ENGAGEMENT RING- $2,100 
vahie, wis sol for $1 ,600. Never 
worn. (414)862-6901. 




Lawn/Qarden 



MOWER- TORO SELF- 
PROPELLED electric start 
2yr8.new, cost $750, sell $450; 
Hedge trimmer, electtk:. 1 84nch, 
$45: Edger. electric, $45. (708) 
883-9988. 




LMGE SFRIHG HmSERI STOOL 

AUCTION 

Sal., July 3rd, 11 AM 

Adam Fritz Co, 

24838 N. Old McHanry Road 

(3 miles E. of Rto. 12), Lake Zurich 

Fresh dug Norlhern Trees, Shrubs & 

Evergreens. Potlod'B.iB. Ready to 

load. Full Catalog Sale Day. 

For more Information 
(708)438.5101 




Miscellaneous 




Miscellaneous 



3-VENDMG MACHMES SNACK 

with 30 setectkins, coffee, and 
7up. Afl In good dbndnion. (414) 
275-6009. 

>CLASSICig720id3T«omdo, 
9oat oorxUon. reduced to $2,700. 
Electric hospital bed, new 
mattress,$350. Efedric lawn 
chair, $75.(708)587-5687 Atler 
3pm. 

LASER FACISIMtLE MACHINE. 
Stiaip 3300, plain paper FAX 
machine. Top quality laser 
provides camera-ready, 
reproduceable copy that 
Butomatkafty reduoes/orlarges. 
Perfect for graphics, forms, 
Indepth detailed propolis. . lyr 
old, mint, with all BELLS and 
WHISTLES, Win sea for SBOO. 
(Retail $2,200.) Can Sharon or 
Bob at (708) 22^-^181. ^ 



COLOR TV, SONY 27/Inch, 
Mtilf^ystem, $525; WashorAlyer, 
Whlipod, $550/^hL Al 1yrJ4EW. 
3-pc. Bedroom set, new queen 
mattress, $500/best. (70B) 
263-3673. 

DOUBLE KITCHEN SINK wth 
double drali^Kiard, complete 
wfth faucets, by Kohler; 17Hewel 
ininols walch, Stewail special: 
t<odak Retina Reflex IV camera; 
1965 AMBASSADOR 4-door 
sedan, 23antr. Needs wortc Can 
Frank (414) 652-2895. 

FOR SALE- PANASONIC "Haid 
Pack* Celkjlar phone. Includes 
Battoty pack, chargor. lighter 
adapter, and external antenna. 
Good condition, over $2,000 
new, $175. (all Ralph (708)390- 
8050 Xfl67 or (708)546-5809. 



Friday. July 2, 1993 



-GOT 
Memi] 
taken 
resort 
Resbl 
Hotllf 

IBMV 
adap 

$300 

JIM 
plect 

sef'.r 
838^ 

STA 

(414 

E 

ATTI 
PIEC 
extra 
$1.5 

^Al 
PIA 
Bra'i 
251 

FOI 
CO 
(70 

GL 
DP 

sta 
2a 

PI/ 
e» 
mi 
Ge 
P« 
sc 

ai 
(4 

U 

Q 


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^-i- '-■> :^;-. -- 



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j..iits^gwf^*a 



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1^ 

a.*. 



9- 
8. 

in 

ill 
10. 

!2: 

n. 
ize 

ler, 
IE. 
St. 



lor 
and 
les, 
r08) 

5r 

/CH. 
J tor 
Inch 
[tlon 



nalod 
inter, 
■1435. 

i)inet, 
(200; 
(708» 




MONO 
$2,100 
I. Never 




SELF- 
■lc start 
^l$450; 
,ia*»ch. 
<tS.(706) 




ellaneous 



MY 27/Jnch, 
WasherAkyer. 
.AllyrJCW. 
I, new queen 
rbest. (708) 

ENSlNKwth 
ird, comploto 
3hlen 17-iowel 
awart special; 
.lex IV camera; 
\DOR ^-door 
Beds work. C£d 
-2B95. 

lASONtCHaid 
Itone. Includes 
iharger, lighter 
lemal antenna. 
1, over $2,000 
na}ph(708)390- 
f08)54 6-5809. 

/July 2, 1993 



tiij ^w 



i»jsa»-, 



MARKET QUIOE 



:^^^t^S^!w?s^^.?ty«r.fi»»:?.r-aa-'^ >y7a«<far*i^)!^WiawWi^ffss»jw«*'^^'*^?.l 




Miscellaneous 



ESC 



Pets & Supplies 



FREESTANDING- 
WOODBURNINQ FIREPLACE 
lor sate. Includes llreplace tools, 
chlTiney pieces, and grate. SIOO. 
Call (414y65fl-4479, leave 
message It no answer. 

-GOT A CAMPGROUND 
Membersh^ orTlmeshare? We'll 
take K! America's Most sucessful 
resort fBsale dearingtiouse. Call 
Resort Sales Iftfonnallon loll free 
Hotline. 1/800-423-5967 24hr3. 

IBM WHEELWRflER UKE new, 
adapter lor use as pc Printer. 
5300. (706) 526-1769. 

JIM BEAM DECANTERS 30 
pieces Including &-pIoce Irain 
set. If Interested please call (708) 
836-1814. •' -■ ' ^ 

STAIN GLASS- $1. BO SQ.FT. 
(414)654-9270.. 




Musical . 
Instruments 



ATTENTION DRUMMERS1 16- 
PIECE LUDWIQ Dnim set, plus 
extras. S3,200 value. Wll sacrMcQ 
$1,500(708)740-6003. 

Baldwin axronsonic 

PIANO Excellent tone. $650. 
Bra'as Piano lamp, $20. (708) 
251-2039. 

FOR sale-clarinet, GOOD 
CONDnriON. $300 or Best OTer. 
(706)223-1823. 

GUITARISTS, bassists. 
DRUMMERS. Interested In 
starting a band, call (70e}54S- 
2891.- ■^^■-^^-..- \ 

PIANO- KIMBALL CONSOLE. 

exoeflBrt condton, hltf)es( grade 
model made. Artist series. ■ 
Cabinetry beautiful legs, l-plece. 
Pecan finish. Keys perfect- no 
scratches. Matching bench, 
appraised by Bradford's. Call 
(414)694-1276.?;:-"^: •:' 

UPRIQHT'PIANO- GOOD 
oondUon, daric wood. $400 or best 
offer. (414)537-2397. 

WURLIT7ER ORGAN, SUPER 
Sprte, fun maker, good oonciOoo 
with bench. $125. (708) 
395-7385, 




Pets & Supplies 



2iYEAR-0LD AKC 

REGISTERED, red-and-whlte 
female Basaett Hound, very 
energetic, needs loving home 
wdh older tdds, $250. Only eerlous 
cans, please. (414)862-6737. 

AIRDALE- PUPPIES. AKC, 1st 
shots, l-male, 1 -female, (414) 
689-6069, Ready NOWl 

AKC CHOCOLATE LAB 

puppies jxth parerb OFA oettned 
and on premlsas.Born May 
. 2nd.Female.$350, males $300. 
(414)878-1203. • 

MINIATURE PINCHER AKC, 

Stag red, Champton bk)odtIr)es, 
1/male, 7month3 old, ears 
cropped, (706) 6a9-<^7l4. 

AKC ROTTWEILER PUPPIES, 
mate/Iemate, exoeilerl dsposWon, 
family raised, parords great wUh 
kkls. Ready to go end of Ju|y> 
$400-$600. (708) 526-1286. 




1 HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAY! 

The Assisi 
Animal 
oundation 

ONE CAN 

MAKEA 

DIFFERENCE^. 

TOGETHER WE'LL 

MAKEAMIRICLE. 

GIFTS ARE 

TAX DEDUCTIBLE. 

NOT FOR ^ 

PROFIT... 

VOLUNTEER 



We don't destroy homeless 
animals! They live their full lives 
uncaged if. not adopted. We spay 
and neuter, conduct a dynamic pet 
visitation/therapy program for the 
elderly, provide education 
programs for young people and 
offer a special 'pet retirement" 
program. THAMK YOU FOR 
YOUR HELP! 



j"Name~ 
I Ad(dress. 
I City, St_ 



i Zip Code 

Mndividual Membership $15. 

Ipamity Membership $20 Donation $ 

{ Please mail to: Assist Animal Foundation 
P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815) 465-9411 




Wanted To Buy 



CHAMPION BLOODLINE 
FAWN male Shar-PoJ, has all 
shots, 12 weeks bkJ. Excellent 
famly and guard (414)682^^433. 

CHOW-CHOW -AKC 

REGISTERED, lemais, black, 
1-yrold, $150 (414) 656-1263. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS 

born May 22,1993, AKC 
regfetered. dew claws removed, 
mottier on prernbes. Ready soon! 
No better dog lor kids, Doni 
miss these pupplesl 
Females,$37S. Males $350. 
(706)356-3277. - 

GREAT DANE PUPPIES, 2 
liters, top qpialy, black, fawn, and 
brindle. AKC, shots, wonned, 
champton lines (414)248-2597 
alter 5pm. ask lor Sandy. 

GREAT PYRANESE. PUPPY 

6-month3oW.Housebroken,dog . 
house inducted. (708)548-2891. 

WHAT'S SO DIFFEHENt 
ABOUT THE HAPPY JACK 3-X 
FLEA COLLAR? It Works. 
Cortahs NO syrthetic pj^^sttvukbl 
At feed and Hardware stores ' 
evepfwtwfe and TSC STORES. 

MALE SHELTIE- PART St. 
Bernard mix, 100 pounds, 
excellent with children, good 
home only. (708)587-9065. 

PROFESSKWAL BIRD TAMING 
AND TRAINING. ALSO BUY. 
SELL, or TRADE ANY TYPE 
OF BIRDS and CAGES. Call 
Jim (708)740-4756. 

RED DOBERMAN, 11-WEEKS 

okj mate, Purebred, S200it>est 
offer. (708)223-7319. Of (708) 
223-0284. 

SHELTtE PUPPIES, AKC. good 
quality and temperment, family 
raised, BeautHul rmrWngs.Tris 
and Sables. $200-$250. (815) 
946-2001. - 

AKC TIBETAN TERRIER, 3 

month otd male, $400, (708)395- 
8148. 

AMERICAN ESKIMO PUPS. 
TAKING ORDERS NOW bom 
&mi9i. (4)Btaiitl1UI pure white 
pupplM to ehooM from. All 
raited In. loving fainity 
■nvlromeiit. Parents on 
premlaee, $27S/m. Purtbr*d 
with papers. Knee-hl sized 
fully ijrown. Excellent family 
dog% OTMt wHh Uds and other 
pets. Order early and watch 
your puppy grow and become 
familiar with you and your 
family. Ready lo Go Iwme July 
IBih to loving homat only! 
(708) 223-8161 ext.HOdaya. 
,: Of (70e)MtM>41S, after S:3Qpm. 

BETTER THAN A Kennell 
DEPENDABLE and MATURE 
ADULTS Will care for your 
DOQ/Pup while you're on 
vacation, Make reservations 
eaityi Tender loving care and 
attention In our home. Fenced 
yard. Must be able to get abng 
with other sweetheart(dog) 
residents. References and 
Reasonable. Call anytime 
(70B)966-6319 Ftorence. 



..AAAAAAAA... PAYING $25 
TO $40 FOR MOST JUNK 
CARSI Glenn's Towing (708) 
244-43620 24 hra. 

ABLE TO PAY cash for 1940'3 
fumlture, spectalUing In dining 
room, bedroom sets. Also, 
depression glass and poltery. 
(708)263-8562. 

APPLIANCES- WASHERS, 
DRYERS, FURNITURE AHD 
HOUSEHOLD GOODS ' 

WANTED. Wl Buy or Sel loryou. 
(708)263-3772. 

LOOKING FOR REASONABLY 
priced 4-wheeler/dli1 BIKE, that 
you/I woukj feel safe letting a 
S-IO/yr.otd rkle on Fami land, 
(backyard). Under $200. Call 
after 5:30pm (708)949-0415. 

KITCHEN CABINETS 
REMODELING your Kitchen? 
Am interested In buying y ou r okl 
set of cabtnels. Please call (815) 
3B&-5415. • 

PIANOS: ANY CONDITION. No 
ok) uprights over 4g-tnches tall. 
No organs please. Quick cashi 
(414)246-6491; 

REGAL CHINA, REDrldlng 
hood, Cookie Jars, canisters, 
any pteces. Elen (706) 655-4762. 

SLOT MACHINES, JUKE 
BOXES, MUSIC BOXES, 
Nkkekxteon and Cote Machines 
wanted or related parts, any 
condition. CASHI Call. 
(708)985-2742 or write Frank 
ZVgnurt, P.Ofiox 542 Weslmoni, 
IL 60559. 

WANTED TO BUY- Appliances 
and furniture and all househokl 
goods and lawn equipment. 
(708)263-3772. 

WANTED- WANTED- WANTED: 
COPY OF 1993 ATLANTIC 
MAGAZINE. Call (706)634-3025. 

WANTED: JUNK CARS and 
- Trucks, all sizes; also farm 
machinery, top price paid. 
HEBRON, 10-car garage 
$500/monlh. 2-car garage 
$200/monlh. (815) 36^^1329. 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 




Carpentry. 



FINE FURNITURE ft CABINET 
refinlshlng. Make the old look 
like new. (708)546-6941. 



SI6 



Housekeeping 



S17 



Landscaping 






MULCHES 

Sbtxlded 0«k UCVOl Yd. 

SlveddodOau £IIVCu.Yd. 

StnddodPiiB S3(VC^Yd. 

OcuCiMltfChitM UOCilYcL 

OcuOilcQiin l}1VCa.Yd. 

FREE DELIVERY 

8 per ywd to iptead 

Call: SURE GREEN 

(708)483-9300 

(800)303-5150 




Legal Services 



$SaveAltonjey'sFees$ 
Bankruptcy From $75.00, 

Divorce S1S[).00 

WIII/Livlng Trust $290.00 

Call Toll Free 1-800-556-0505 

U.S.'Sclf.Hclp Litigation, Inc. 



YOU ALWAYS 

HIT THE 
MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 




TWrwWTrTSTWWWQWWWSSfiWWft 



REAL ESTATE 




]^;.^HoniQS For Sale 






Hiii^ 



vy,.V.>.y^^^W/<^----.-.-J. 



HOUSECLEANING- WE WILL 
Clean your Home to your 
specifications. Sallsfactlon 
guaiartoed. Ftoforenoes provldod. 
Reasonable rates. Ask about 
our cleaning gift certlfk:ate3 and 
how you can obtain FREE 
cleaning. Call Andrea. (708)263- 
S244. - 

A TYLMAN ENTERPRISES. 

HOUSE Cleaning and Lawn 
Mowing Services. Weekdays/ 
Weekends. Try U« Once, Youll 
Always Call Back. (706) 
746-2428. or Pagori (708)944- 
9260. 

WILL CLEAN YOUR home, 
cohdo, or apartment. Weekly or 
bt-weeUy. ExceBenl references. 
(708) 636-0648. 




I 



Homes For Sale 




|V HontesForSale 



MOVING?? CALL BOS The 
Mover. FumSure; pianos; sales; 
restaurant equipment; Light 
machinery. Lift gate van and 
small crane trucks. PACK RAT 
EnlerprlBee. (708)662-1956. 



S29 



Foots 



BRAND NEW 12X3FT. above 
ground steel wan pool wtth solar 
cover and skimmer net. Never 
Used. $150 (708) 872-8719. 




Professional 
Services- 



LES & JEAN SIGNS. 
Handieltering- boats, trucks, 
banneis, magnetks, ETC. Moble 
Shop. (708) 587-^060. 

STAY COOL! AUTO ^ass twmg- 

Buildings 3M. Summer prk»s. 
Energy phis windows (Kenoaha) 
(414)-694-3851. 



S45 



Trees/Plants 



TREE&STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
Seasoned Haidwood 

Nordstrom TV^e 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 
708-526-0858 



■iJR-^ 




SERVE EVERYONE 



••BY OWNER** 
LAKE GENEVA Lovely 2- 
bedroom year raund. vacation 
home wKh fireplace and nice 
Florida room. Inctudee 19ft. 
, lO boil. boat buoy and privrie 
lake rights. Only $89,900 (414) 
27fr-3347. . 

ANfnOCH BY OWNER- Savel 5- 

yrs. Newl Sunny. 34)edrDom, 2- 
bath, full basement, ranch wth 
2-1^acar garage, certraf air, dock, 
beauduly Landscaped. $147^00 ^ 
(708)395^^527. J| 

ANT10CH. SWM - BOAT- FISHL 
LAKEFHONT IMng at Rs besll 
soft. Graaa Lake frontage on 
the Chain, 3M-*cn^ 3-4bedroom 
ranch, new kftchen and bath, . 
all appliances, full basement, 
2-1/2 car garage, la rg* deck 
ovarlooking lake. $209,900. 
Call today for detail* or 
ap polritmwit (706)631 -3602 No 
raaltora pteise. 

DISCOVER YOUR AMERICAN 
DREAM. Is the rising cost of 
housing keeping you from the 
American Dream of owning a 
home? Ttwn you may want to 
consider ctiooslng a modem 
manufactured txKne. For more 
inlormalton call the Illinois 
Manulactured Housing Asoc. 
1/800-252-&495. YOU CAN'T 
AFFORD NOT TO MAKE THB 
CALLI 

BY OWNER- SOUTHERN WGC. 

Saiem/Sllver Lake area t)y Fox 
Rtver, goverrwnent ceriRkxl not 
in flood plain, high and dry. 
Beautiful 3- wooded lots, aprox. 
12-mature oaks, frul trees and 
ptnes. 2-ttedroom.f»me, easily 
made to 3, new roof and holding 
tark Syrs. ago. Needs sone TIC. 
$49.000flrm No agents, please. 
By appointment only! Leave 
message, (414) 537-4490 or 
(606)339-7624. 



3-BEDROOM CAPE COD, 

Fenced yard, CLoso to Beach, 
NOW ONLY $56,900 Ask for 
Josie, Century 21-Rockefbach 
(708)546-1870. 



GOVERNMENT 
HOMES 

From $1 (U repair). 
Delinquent tax property. 
Repoiseiiiont. Your area 
(1) g05-962-80pO Ext: GH 
4458 for canent lepo liit. 



!i] Michael Lescher tj 

"Your Link to the Chain" 



E^08) 395r30pd 




iHiiSBiiiiiH 



V, ff-'f-'J-f,: 



!?!Vv'-?!vA^;y,>^^^.^?^1?'Jw?"-yy-J!?^ 



Branti new 3 bedroom 2 bath home 200' 
off Fox Lake. Great view and lake 
access.Great room with sliders to deck. 
Walkout basement with sliders to yard 
and 2.5 car garage. $119,900 

Re/Max Advantage 



t=j 

EquyHoiMing 
Opp0itmiiM 



Ail real estate advertising in ihis newspaper 
is subject to the Fair Housing Act of 1968 
wiiich makes It iiiegal lo advertise 'any 
preference, limitation or discrimination based 
on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial 
status or national origin, or an intention to 
make any such preference, limitation or 
discrimination. 



-'.Vi^^-. 









Lakeland Newspapers 

(708)223-8161 



What's New On the Market 



Ct£AN^:UT LAWN SERVICES. 

Lavnnowlng, landscaping, Gutter 
Cteanhg arvl in9lal1atbr>, naklng, 
call Don Malzahn. 1524 
MeadowBrook, Round Lake 
Beach. (708) 740-9168. 
■QUALITY AT AFFORDABLE 
PHICESf 



Vacant Land 

Elxcellent Hawthorn 

Woods Location 
2.11 acres on private cul- 
de-sac. Largest Lot in 
Bridle Woods! Come build 
your dream home todayl 
Priced to sell fast $89,900. 
Lot «I70 Steeplechase Dr. 

- Call Mary Bebak 
C-21 American Northwest 
(70S) 726-2100 



OFFICE SPACE 

FOR RENT 

On Rle. 12 near 
Richmond. 800 sq. 
ft. new buikling with 

air conditioning. 

$450/mo. 
(815) 675-6677 



EXCEPTIONAL 

163 Kincald, Lake Zurich 
Quality constaiclion & design 
is evident throughout Ihls 
custom 2-slory near the lake I 
Custom, customi It's these 
custom touches that make 
this home 'extra special". 
$237,500 

Call Mary Bebak at 

(708)726-2100 

C-21 American Northwest 



HALF ACRE HOMESITE 

The Homeslta is Beautiful I 
This home is a charmer. 
H.W. floors, brand new 
kitchen flooring, freshly 
painted Interior, 2 car garage 
w/a workshop, mature land 
scaping, too. Hurry, this one 
won't lasli $155,000 

Oak Grove, UbBrtyviHe, IL 

C-21 American Northwest 

call Maiy Bebek 
708-726-2100 



UNIQUE FRENCH 
MANOR HOME 

B«iuii1uly Bttuatod on 3.5 acras ot 
e»]utekt ««talft propwty in KHdow, 
luturing a privalA pond and mature 
lush landscaping. Solid masonry 
brick conttnidion, muki zoned ayt- 
terriB, formal IMng and dining arsaa, 
Z master oultaa, olfica/den. Ful tin- 
tahad wikout baaantant. wat bar, 
atrft/m w/hol tub and ao much moral 
A must SMi Cal Mary Bebak. 

C-Zl American Norttiwest 

708-726-2100 > 
ask for Mary Bebak 



WAUCONDA 

2 bedroom Ranch In 
town, 2 car heated 
garage on large lot. 
City sewer & water. 
BARGAINl 

$84,900 

Ryan & Co. Realtors 
(708) 526-0300 



STAfELY COLONIAL 

3 bedroom, newly remod- 
eled t 1/2 balh and country 
kitchen. Beautiful fenced 
yard w/greal deck. Seller 
transferred! $89,900. 

VA/FHA 

Call: Miranda Reader 

orJeanette Donahue 

Century 21 

MakI & Assoc. 

708-336-7333 



GUR 

New listing! $134,900 

Landtoven take notelll 
Weil malnt. Iri level on 1/2 
acre lot. 3 bd, 2 ba, cus- 
tom eat-in kitchen + dining 
rm, sun room w/firepiace 
+ fam. room. 

Call Debbie 
Remax N.IV. 

(708)827-1117 



Gurnee 

By Owner 

Just Reduced! $1 12,900 
3bdmi, X 1/2 bath, 1 1/2 
car garage on nice cor- 
ner lot All new kitchen. 
Beautiful condition. 
36790 Grandwood. 

708-356-4382 



DONT MISS OUT! 

To lind out how you can 

include your listings In 

this weekly feature and 

run in all 14 of our Lake 

County newspapers, call 

your 

CLASSIFIED 

AD-VISOR TODAY 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(708) 223-8161 



Outstanding 

Park city Mobile Home 

2 bd, )g bath, all appliances, 
fireplace, storage shed. 
Roomy kitchen. This is the 
one I $29,900 

Paradise Koues Realty 

815-385-1960 

or 

DEENIE 

Pager #708-881 -2431 



OUTSTANDING LOCATION 
IN EXCLUSIVE DEER PARK! 

Nosllod on a quiet cul-de-sac, 
bodying lo a torost preserve. This 
otegant lanch lealures spoctacu- 
tor views from ovory room, wlih all 
tho oxirat includedl Coma see 
Ihis beauly today. 

23455 Mallaj-d Court 
Deer Park. IL 

021 American NorUiwest 

call Mary Bebek 
708-726-2100 



Let's Deal! 

One of the largest units in 

'the complex, countryside 

townhome, 2013 Westvlew, 

Round Lake Beach, for sale 

by owner. OPEN EVERY 

SUNDAY 1-4 pm til sold. 

Huga savings, buy direct 

from us. no commissions 

. added in. 

MOVVATED 

Incentives if purchased imme- 

dialely. We'll listen to creative 

partial down paymenL 3 

bdrm, 1 1/2 bath, living room 

with fireplace, dining room, 

kitchen, family room, 2 car 

garage. MAKE OFFER. 

Move in immedlatoly. Call 

(708) 546-08 1 7 or (708) 740- 

6149 leave msg. 

Must sell. Moving out of town 

as soon as you mova inl Job 

related urgency. 

$89,900. 



Beautiful 

New 3 bdrm. 2 full 
baths, manufactured 
home in Lake 
Geneva. Vinyl dou- 
ble-glazed windows, 
central air, 2x6 side 
wall construction, 
(1,152 sq ft). All Ihis 
& more on nice deep 
lot for $41,900. Pool, 
clubhouse facility, 
playgrounds & more. 
Call for details. 
414-248-3831 

Pioneer Ests. 

Hwy. H. South 
Lake Geneva, Wl 



i 






Friday, July 2, 1W3 



Lakeland Nowtpaper* 45 



;■) 



{ 

-.,V 

(I- 






U! ■ 




Homes For Sale 



3-BEDROOM RANCH, 

FtREPLACE, richly carpeted 
IMng room/dlnlng room, kitchen 
and targe famly room, 1-iy2balh, 
basemeni, 2-car garage. 
S169.50O. NOTE: wIthMrithout 
Ingrourtd poo!. (12x24) Fenced 
lot. (708) 336-0866; (708)662- 
7960 owner/agent. 



JACUZZI ANDFIREPLACEII- 
FOX LAKE. Oriers this 
4bedroom,2-slory home on full , 
aero. Deluxe Brick arxJ cedar 
w/Engllsh basement. 3-car 
gaiago, central air, energy etfkiefi 
2x6 exterior walla, Many 
upgrades. Call (or details- See 
houBQ now... at under 
construction pricing. A 
BARGAIN at $249,900. Deal 
direct WITH Bullderl (70S) 
£26-^306. 

AFFORDABLE WATERFRONT 
ON CHAIN OlakBS, In Spring 
Grove. 2-bedroorTB, huge master 
bedroom. This bouse has been 
remodeled. Seautllul stone 
tbBplaco In oak trim Itvtng room, 
Cedar dining room with large 
bay window. KHctian has oak 
cabinets and trim. Quarry tile 
tloor and ceramic ttle counter 
top, breakfast rxrakand stained 
glass doors to laundry room. 
Shed, 3-dock3 with 75!t. pier. 
$125,00^. MUST SELLI 
(708)587-0903. 

DOOR COUNTY HOME - 3 

bedroom home located on 3/4 
wooded acre In Balto/s Haibor. 
Attached garage, new carpeting, 
new plumbing, new well, Many 
updates. All In country decor. 
Furnished or non- furnished. 
Must see. $62,500. (708)244- 
4484, ask for Wayrw or Carol, 

FOR SALE BY CWNER. Localed 
near Mchenry Country Club. 
Maintenance-free 2-bedroom 
house, detached 2-1 y2car garage. 
Nice, quiet neighborhood. 
$95.000. (815) 385-5995. 

FOX LAKE- 3.040 sq.lt. 
Beaulluly remodeled (5]be(*oom. 
2-l)alhs, olftee, laundry, dining, 
famiV and entertalnmoni rooms. 
Closets throughout, fireplace, 
central air. Aprfl-alre, 2-deck3, 
maIntonarK©-f ree sWIng. Eaves 
and seamless gutters. New black- 
top driveway, EVERYTHING IS 
NEW) Immediate occupancy, 
$159,000, 29 Poplar, for vtewkig 
caB JotmGebert (706) 587-6772. 

BUILD YOUR OWN HOME 
NOWIl NO downpayment on 
Miles materials, bek>wmart(et 
xnslructlon flnandng. Call Miles 
Homes today. 1/800-34^2884, 
axt.1. 



HEATHEHIDGE 
TOWNHOME-PRIME 
LOCATIQNt 1-bedroom loft, 
fireplace. I.Sbath, centralalr, 
dtehwasher, washor/dryer. white 
appliances. The Oak Model for 
HR! Priced to sell- $70,000. Call 
Lisa (or appointment (708) 
916-1 D20evo3. 

ILLINOIS/WISCONSIN 
BORDER- 4 bedroom chalet 
heme, 2 t»(h. 2 Hnjplaoes, finished 
basenerl; vtew ol Late Mtchigaa 
Asking $185,000. Bulldable 
75x140 ft. lot also available. 
Asking $20.000, (414) 942-1808. 

UNDENHUHST- 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH In super location, 
separate dining room, a stor>e 
fireplace and beamed celling 
enhances ttw massive tec room 
(30x26). large eal-ln Wtchen, all 
NEW windows throughout, NEW 
lighting and celling fans In 
evoryroom. all on an oversized, 
nteely landscaped tot. 2-1/2car 
attached garage. Yours tor Of^Y 
$129,500. Call for Viewing, 
(708)265-0443/ owner. 

HEATHER RJDGE, GURNEE, 
BY CWNER. 3*edh)om, 2-balh, 
oorrwrunit towntwme. Fkeptaco. 
vaulted ceilings, completely 
remodeled throughout. AH new 
\ appliances. Walk to 
pool/clubhouse. $88.000/obo 
(708)918-8168. 

WAUKEGAN. CUSTOM BUILT 
S^jedroom, 3-l^Zbattis, Tri-leveL 
Greenwood school iocallon. 
Large family room, great for 
raising family and/or entertaining, 
Large living roonvdining room 
combo, ceriral ak-. 2-car attactied 
garage, By appointment Only 
$220,000. No Realors. 32429qJL 
(708)662-1863. 



GRAYSLAKE 

Fami house in excel- 
lent condition on 1 
acre. 4 bedrooms, 2 
bth, 2 car garage. 
$169,900 

Forney & Co. 

(708) 362-2000 



OPEN HOUSE 



fnn 



msma 



(^ ■, 



MC HENRY- OPEN HOUSE- 
Sal. asun. JULY 3-4th, 9am- 
6pm. OR by Appointment. 3- 
bedroom Ranch. 2-car garage, 
centred air, deck, $96,000 Worth 
tatdng a LOOKl (815)344-^256. 




MC HENRY/ RIVER RIGHTS. 
Cfiarmlng 3-bedroom ranch, lull 
basement, fireplace, central air. 
2-car garage witfi attached 
screened porch on 3/4-acre. 
Well Malntahod. $129,900 (815) 
344-3981. 

WATEFFORD. WL 3-inACRES: 
2.600sq.ft. now 3te<*T)om ranch 
homo. $195,000 (414) 763-8503. 

WISCONSIN- FONTANA- 
GENEVA LAKE. *Unlque 3- 
bedroom, 2-bath home with 
vaulted cellngs, *Massive natural 
f irepiace In great room. *Ma|GStk: 
trees and wooded privacy. 
•Oversized 2-car tiealod garage. 
•Huge entertainment deck, 
•Geneva Lake righls. -All this 
coukl be yours for on^ $179,500 
(Low taxes) Call owner after 
5pm (414) 275-3347. 

NICE NEIGHBORHOOD IN 

Round l.ake Beach. 3 bedroom, 
1-1/2 bath tri -level with large 
family room & fenced yard, new 
carpet and central air, excellent 
condlion, priced ttelow maricet at 
$85.000. (708)566-6056. 

TOUND LAKE BEACH- trf- level. 
9 room, 3 bedroom, 2 full balh. 
kjjge tot. oversto garage, fenced- 
hyaid, move-ki condion. Zoned 
commercial. Asking $109,900. 
(708)546-8832 anytime. 

SILVER LAKE, Wl. By Ovmer: 
Almost new, 3-bGdroom. 
1.500sq.ft. + 1,500sq.ft. finished 
basement. 1-3/4bath. 
dshwasf)er. refrtgeralor, Jenn-Air 
range, natural gas heat, central 
air, city sewor, 2-l/2car garago. 
and 24tt. pool. $145,900. Extra 
lot available. Phone John 
(414)876-3304. 

TIRED OF SUBDIVISION 

HOUSES THAT ALL LOOK THE 
SAME? WANT MORE SPACE 
AND PRIVACY? For sale by 
owner In island Lake, prtce 
reduced from real estate listing- 
You save the whole oommlsskin. 
4-bedroom3, 1-1/2 balhs. new 
windows. wtMte house fan. large 
k)l. tteaulHul trees, Quiet street, 
unincorporated so LOW taxes, 
$110.000. (708) 526-2502. 

TWIN LAKES. WISCONSIN. - 

LARGE Raised Ranch, JUST 
3-mIles north of Illinois border. . 
Fheptaoe. certral air, water rigtts. 
Buy from Builder and SAVE. 
$128,900. Possible Renl/Buy 
option. (708)526-6306. 

WATERFRONT PARADISE- 
NEWLY REMODELED, 3 

bedroom. 1-1/2 bath Raised 
Ranch. 2 car garage, deck, dty 
sewer and water, laiige k>t with 
mature oaks. $123,9(20. (708) 
526-3821. 




Homos 
For Rent 



ANTIOCH- HOUSE RENTAL 
wlh Optbn to BUY! l-BEDROOM 
totally remodeled, spectacular 
deck. Certral air, diannoHronago 
near mouth of Channel Lake. 
Rental $735/month. ($89,900.) 
(706)487-6161. 

WANTED: HOUSE OR 
townhome. SOONll 2-or- 
3bedfoom. Rental or buy Option 
possble. Round Ljake Schools. 
To Occupy July 15lh? Under 
$650Anonthpfk» range PlEASe. 
Call (706)740-2789. Or call 
alternate day ptKino. (708)966- 
6319. 

BEAUTIFUL AND SPACIOUS 

e-tMdroom house. 2-full baths, 
large deck, 6-car garage. Located 
In Fox Lake, near public 
transportation. Available July 
1st. Sl,100/mo. with garage. 
$900Avilhout. (312) 587-8102 
Of (81 5)675-2651 . leawa messago 

FOX LAKE- 3 bedroom, tauncfey, 
lakelront. $760 per month plus 
securty deposit. (815)653-2122. 

FOX LAKE- 3-BEDROOM ranch, 
new kitchen, and balh. flnsplace, 
large ctosets, large family room, 
1-block from lake. 1-1/2monlh 
security dep and references. 
$800/month (703) 566-8866. 

GRAYSLAKE TOWNHOUSE. 
AVAILABLE Aug.1 . 3 full lloors 
of livings, 2+be*oom3, garage. 
ferKed yard. pool, clubhouse, 
' lst^& last security. $850/month 
Broker/ owner Christopher Hoelz. 
(708) 223-6260. 

GRAYSLAKE- Z-BEDROOM, 
2-BATH, single family home. 
Private garage, large yard, 
minutes from towii. No dogs. 
$a25/month. (312) 561-3222. 

GURNEE- 3 BEDROOM, large 
wooded tot. Cape Cod home. 
Gumee shcoots. $1 ,200/month. 
Available Juty 1 . (708)662-6087. 

GURNEE: 3-BEDROOM HOME, 
1-1/2 bath, family room, large 
fenced-in wooded backyard. 2- 
1/2car garago. Gumee school 
dist References required. (708) 
336-1538 for appolnlrrwnt. 

JOHNSBURG. RIVERFRONT. 
ALL brick house, 2 bedroom, 1 
bath, fireplace. 1- Ifficar garage, 
no pets. $825 per nnonlh. (815) 
344-2726. ■ 

LINDENHUnST- LAKEFRONT 
3-BEDROOM, 2-story, full 
basemeni. short term lease 
aralabte, $1 .250 (706)638-1778. 



LONG LAKE WATERFRONT 
2-bedroom house,' hardwood 
floors, porch, basement. 
$685Anonth +u11Htles. (708)480- 
.5760.day3. (708) 945-3442 
eves or weekends. 

.LONG LAKE-SMALL 1 bedroom 
house, large fenced double lol, 
appliances, carpet, no pels. $530. 
(703)839-2346. . 

MUNDELEIN LUXURY 3- 

BEDROOM, 1-1/2ba1h. largo 
equ^ped kitchen, llvIng/dlnlng, 
basement, with washor/dryer. 
central air. attached garage, 
yard, excellent location. 
$1,050/month. August 1st. (706) 
945-0449. 

WAUKEGAN- 3-BEDROOM 
HOUSE. $750/month. 

washer/dryer, micro Irrduded, 
off street parkkig. (31 2) 33S-0199. 

ZION- 2 BEDROOM, freshly 
decorated, new carpeting. No 
pets. Refrigerator and stove. 
Furnished. Available now. 
(708)872-4086, 



NICE HOUSE IN Good 
nelgliMxhoodI 24»droom fwuso 
h Waukegan. Near an efemertary 
school In quiet family 
nolghbortiood. Garage and largo 
enclosed yard. Available Aug. 
Call (708) 295-0105. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bodrpom. 1-1/2balh, centralalr. 
fireplace, deck, appliances, 
washer/dryer. Available August 
1st, $800/tTKjnth plus security. 
(708) 546-6938. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- 1- 
bodroom House NEWLY 
Remodeled, has large t>ack yanl. 
AppItatKes. $420/monlh. ^08) 
546-8130. 

SILVER LAKE, KENOSHA 

COUNTY. Wise. Uke new 3- 
bedroom, 2-balh, dishwasher. 
Carpeted rec room, central air. 
swlTinlng pod, taigs 2<ar garage 
with paved driveway. 
$1 .400/lnonth. Security and last 
months rent required. (414) 
876-3304. 



WAUCONDA- RUSTIC 2-1/2 

bedroom housei' 1-1/2 bath, 
commercial property wlh couf*y 
living, $850/month.- Includes 
Ulllltles. (708) 526-5055, 



RENVU. SEARCH? 

We can he<pl Hundreds 
of listings, air areas of 
Lake County) Sec. 8 OK 

ACCURATE 

(708)244-2511 




Homes Wanted 



WANTED: HOUSE OR 

townhome. SOONII 2-or- 
3t)edmom. Rental or buy Option 
possfclo, Round Lake Sctwob. 
To Occupy July 151h7 Under 
$650itnorih ptka range Pt£ASE. 
Call (708)740-2789. Or call 
attomate day phone, (708)966- 

6319. _:___-_ 

SINGLE FAMILY HOME to rent 
wlh oplkMi h Late Courty. Prefer 
homo wHti acreage or waterfront 
property. (708)949-5577. 







Washington 




72,000 

(on your lot) 



Compere these standard features: 

f 12* of R38 ceiling Insulation 

• 2x6 exterior walls R-20 standard 

■ Ceilings and interior walls are gypsum board 

• Maintenance free vinyl siding, standard 

• Cedar or other sidings, optional 

Welcome 
Home 

TOOVER90,0()0 
FAMILIES • 



•Gas forced air iiaai 

• Poachtroe insuisiod metal dad entrance door 

• Berrrul wood w'mdov^ with maintenanca froe 
eicierlofdadwrBpplrfgs. 

• A conplat* hoiiM, paint, itaJrwl and cuptlad. 

Price does ml Ircbds permits, survey and engi- 
neering lot clearing sewer and water or seplfc 
ard wflll. culverts, driveways, walks, tarKfecap- 
trig or financing (Tliese and other site Inprove- 
mertls availablo. Lower (a vets on Bl-isvels and 
Tri- teveb not fi Dished). 



COUNTY LINE BUILDERS 

21 6 Janet Drive Island lake 
708-526-8306 



TRIPLE "A" BUILDERS 

34390 N. Rte. 45 Lake Villa 
708-223-7900 



LAKELAND MORTGAGE MARKET 



(A Service (5f Mortgage Market Information Services And Lakeland Newspapers) 

MORTGAGE HOTLINE FOR DAILY MORTGAGE NEWS. UPDATES AND TODAY'S MOST COMPETITIVE RATES 976-8500 (7S«/min.) 



ECONOMIC EVENTS 

6/26 Weekty Auction of 3 & 6 Month T-Bills 6/29 New Homes Sales 

6/29 Consumer Confidence Index 6/30 Factory Orders 

7/1 Construction Spending 7/2 Monthly Employment Report 



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Rates By Fax 515-5626 
PC Users Bulletin Board 834-1450 

30 Year Dally Rate Chart 





6/21/B3 


' e/22/S3 


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a/2«93 


6/2SS3 












































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ISYr Jun«a 



□ -.IB Y«»rFI»«l 



30 Yr Jumbo □ SOyoorRxod □ OOYoorFHA 



RATE 



TYPE 



PTSFEE 



WOWt 



LOCK 



CAPS 



Advantage Bank 

7 iSyrFut cwgs 5% 

7.S MjTFa (y295 Wf. 

5 1 Cloiing (VMS 10% 

Cfinimrli: CoraL iMi EpKUitli • Lot Uxnt AviL 
Etl 37-17 GrantI \\x. Gumee 6003 1 



708-204-4067 

eodayi 
ConsVEnd Loan 



American Home Finance 

4,G2S lyrARM 0/710 10% 

fl,5 7yiBaDooft' IV270 10% 45dayj 

7,25 3a IT Fa IV270 5% 45 days 

'{;(mmb;WaK0ndienM.AptBJd}tC4nAlla(lMni. im,IND,Hral,WA. 
aift r250W, NWHwy, Sle»700 PaUUne 60067 



708-705-1940 

45 day* 

•7/23 



Associated Financial 

7.25 MyrRx CW95 5\ 

e.7S 15yrF« CW9S 6% 

e.25 SyrBslbonf (V29S 10% 

oomrmnti: Opm Situidiyi B-tZ. 

3i. $95 Skokic Blvd. Stc. 300, Nortlibrook 60062 



708-291-6580 

60 days 
60dayf 
60 days 45/25 



Beacon Mortgage 1-800-559-1993 

7.25 • MvrFa IVSOO 5% 60dayi 

6.875 ISyrFa fl/300 5% 60dayi 

7,5 MyrFtx* (WOO 10% 60 days 'Jumbo 

eomnwnti: Silurdiy i Evmlnji by ippolnlnwnli In you; homa of otilci. 

ffl 31 E. C07UI Lake Ave., CrpUil lake 6001-1 ■ 



iUTE 



TYPE 



PTWEE 



ijowm LOCK 



CAPS 



Block & Co. 708-295-5554 

6JS SOyrRx* 0/120* 10% 60fdayi '2/1/0 Buyitowft 

6.876 ISyrFiK' 0/120* 10% 60+days '2/WGuy(i»«n 

6,125 SyrFix" 0/320+ tO% BOtdayj "l/OBuyiJiwn 

ummanti: Cill ibout our lera po[n1/iero eb*lng coat prognm. 
Jfi 25-1 MMkel Sqiurc Ct Uke Forest 600-f5 



Capitol Federated 815-477-4999 

7i5 30yrRx 0/300 6% eOdays 

6.125 30yrFtxf 0/300 5% 60 days 42/1/0 Buydmn 

6.675 ISyrHx 0/300 5% 60 days 

convnenlii Rolling U«*dcwi;70e-»e^OUE, UI><[tyvigt:7C»457-HOME 
SkSk 17 E Co">tJl lake Rd, Cryiul Like 600N 



Chief Financial croup 708-634-5850 

6.376 eyrBaltoon* 0/300 10% 45 days tS/25 

6,75 ISyffix W300 t0% 45 days 

7.25 aOyfFix 0/300 10% 45 days 

commtnU: NO JUNX FEES. LOWER RATES A VAIUBLE WITH POWTS. 
mSk 101 S. Schdicr Rd. Stc A - 103 lincoliutilrc 60069 



Countrywide Funding 708-816-1377 

7.25 30yrfiK OfigS 6% 45d3ys" 

7 ISyrRx , 0/295 5% 45days 

4.5 lyrAflM 0/295 10% 45days 

conuTMnti: Low Applicilioni Tikin By Undemrritif/Detlilon-Uiliir, I 

S&St 102 J N .Milwaukee Ave.. Ulicny'vllk 6004S 



RATE 



TYPE 



PI&fEE 



%OOWr< LOCK 



CAPS 



FOX Valley iviortgage 1-800-339-9868 

7.375 SOyrFa 0/295 -10% 60 days 

7.25 20yrFH 0^295 10% 60 days 

7 ISyrFot 0^5 10% eodays 

commenls; 2nd moilgigH Uillsbl*. Wl makt housf Gatlt. 
dSaesi W.TcmCoiia»230Cr>3UlLake.6O01-i . 



GMAC Mortgage 


708-680-5090 


7.375 30yrF« 0^300 5% 


60 days 


4.5 lyrAflM 2/DCQ 10% 


eodays 


7.125 30VfF«' 2/300 10% 


60 days 'Jumbo 


convTMnts: 397-GUAC, Schiumbutg oIK:^, 




a !)f 5 Lakevlcw Nrkway Stc. *l lu Vernon IIIIIs 60061 



Guaranteed Financial Mtge services, inc. 1-800-466-0909 

7.25 30yrFa 0/295 5% SOdays 

6.675 ISyrFot Q/29S 5% 60 days 

4,875 lyrAflM 0/295 10% 50 days 

commtnlst Alii ibout our NO FEE LOAN! 
A 19 W.Jackson CtilaE0 606Oi 



JM Mortgage services 1-800-498-7870 

7.25 SOyrFix Ott95 10% 60 days 

6.75 Syr Balloon* 0/295 10% 60 days 'Jumbo 2/6 

7.5 30yrFD(4 0/295 10% 60 days tJumbo 

conntnli; Annilo1miL24hotf innwlngnuchiniNa1hb(ooli7M-191-Tt70 

S& 33-10 Dundee Hd. Nortlibrook 60062 



rwTE 



TYPE 



PTSFEE 



%aam lock 



CAPS 



Lake cook Mortgage 

7.375 SOyrFtX 0/295 10% 

7 ISyrFot OflBS' 10% 

£5 7yi'Balloon' 0095 10% 

convnenti:ZM&foIn(prognmt. Good Jumbo nlit. 
AS$flF(DnUBcRd.Sic272 Nonlirickl 60093 



708-4il1-5121 
eodayi 
eodays 
eodayi 7/23 



North Shore Mortgage 

7,25 MyrFui .75/295 

5.5 lyrARM (V295 

7.25 ISyrFixt 0ft95 

commcnli: Eviniton TOMTHJOa 
:ai& 576 Uncoln, Winneika 60093 



708-446-7472 

10% eOdays 
10% eodays 2/4 
10-25% eodays 4jumbo 



United Mortgage Service 708-480-0101 

7.375 SOyrFa 0/3CX3 , 10% eodays 

6.876 ISyrFix 0/300 10% 60days 

7.5 SOwFot'. 0/300 10% 60 days 'Jumbo 

nmmnts: No doc, condo, jumboi, Invttlminl loans ind 2ml migis fvibblt. 
ffi 3000 Dundee Rd. >308 NorUibrook 60062 



wonderllc Richmond Bank 708-587-4710 

7.375 XfPx 0/300 5% 60 days 

6.875 ISyrFbi 01300 S% 60 days 

7.5 SOyrFa' (VOOO 10% 60days -Jmb) 

commanli; Zero points., No Incoms t Jumbos, EnnlngtwtilundsppUivillsblL 

Ch IWIO.NblnSl, RIclimond 6()071 



LEGEND: Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee Mn Bank M Savings & Loan jffiiiSB Mortgage Bapker j2& Mortgage Broker . -Funds provided by another entily whicti may affect availabllHy. Rates subject 
to ciianae willioul notice Sun/ey Date; 6/28/93 Informalion independently compiled by Mortgage Market Information Services, not affillaled wilh any financial institulion or real estate group, and is believed to be accu- 
rate but not warranted 976-8500 seventy-five cents per mlnule <D Copyright 1 987, 1 9flB, 1 9B9. 1 990, 1 991 . 1992. 1 993. LENDERS CALL ROBIN FOR INFORMATION 708-834-7555. 




US CAP 

rent 3-4! 
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Friday, July 2, 1993 



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■7.75 
■7JS 



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CAPS 



-441-5121 



•7/23 



S-446-7472 

2/4 
♦Jumbo 



18-480-0101 



I *Jumt» 
n ivilibic 








Apaftmonts 
For'Ftent 




Homes Wanted 



US CAPTMN USM DESIRES to 
rent 9<4bedroom, 1-2balh home 
wtth garaoe and basement In 
Lbertyvme, LaKe BfuH and Lake 
FbtesI area Ptease cal (706) 578- 
9859. 




Condos/ 
Town Homes 



CLEAN 1-BEDROOM CONDO 
rental In Vacation Village, 
$S40/mon1h Inctudlng utllRles. 
Ctiain O-Lakea Raalty. (708) 
587-6233. 

FOX LAKE TOWNHOUSE- 

HkUen Glan area. 2 becfeoom pits 
don, A/C washer/dryer, pool/ 
tennis court. Available 8-1-03. 
No pels. Credl check and seoiity 
deposit. (708)251-4702 or 
(708)724-2713. 

FOX LAKE TOWNHOUSE for 
rent or rent with option. 3 . 
badfoom, 1-1 /2i baltis, 
waahor/dryer.pool. and tennis 
court. $750/morth plus 1 month 
security deposl. (815)338-4676 
altar Spm. . 

FOX LAKE- 2BE0RbOM 

townhome lor Sato Of Rert. Pool, 
tennis, t>oallng. Available now. 
(708)729-7431. 

GURNEE- 3-BEDROOM. 1- 
1/2BATH, townhome, prtvale 
er<iance, open neutral floor plan, 
wastier/dryer on Isl floor, C/A, 
anached gajags, DghL blue/Mhle 
exterior, large landscaped 
backyard, $104,500 (706) 
62^-5745. 



I 



08-587-4710 



'S ' *Jtfrt» 
nd ippl'i ivinibl*. 



^ates subject 
d to be accu- 




1976 HOLIDAY RAMBLER 2Zn. 
Motor home, Statesman, 1 ,000 
Domestic refrigerator, A&E 
owning, 44)umer range and oven, 
excellent condRion, Must seel 
$7,995 (708) 433-7200. Ken 
Ferrer!. * 

1992 PRESTIGE DOUBLE 

WIDE, Mobile homo, approx. 
SO^xSCr. Whl(t>ooi, washer/dyer, 
dbhwasher, 34)edpo(n, 2-betfhs, 
air concfltloned, borage shed. 
Paid $46,000 this year, Will sell 
for $40,000. Getting Divorced. 
(708) 263-6000. . 

KIRKWOOD MOBILE HOME, 
2-bedroon)3, 2-baths, lots of 
closet space, Mngroom Mtchen, 
all appliances stay. New air 
conditioner. New furnace, 3- 
smoto alarms. Fenced-H skied, 
porch and shed. $i 5^00 (708) 
54^-0924. 

MOBILE HOME- 12X60, T1ni)er 
Ridge Mobile Home Park, 2 
bedrooms, firopiaoe, new carpet, 
bath, shod and 8idi>g. (414]694> 
1680. 

MOBILE HOME- 1992 CaiTOlton 
24x44, abettoom, 2-b3th. centred 
air, deck, wtikf^xxf, 3-carparMng 
(414) 942-1709. 

NORTH AMERICAN, 1983, 
63x14, 2-bedroom. patio, atr 
conditioning, shed, In good 
condition, Park City, South- 
$20,000 (708) 731-2412. 



usc:o 



FOR S AILE 

CaQfor detaiU 

414-857-2891 

Rjiinbotv 
Lake Manor 



, ^ Apartments 
For Rent 



HIGHLAND PARK, LARGE 2- . 

bedroom apartment Kitchen, 
stove, relrtgorator. carpet, g^at 
location near train arxl town. No 
pels pfease, Avalable Aug. or8/1. 
(708)432-7449.-. 

ISLAND LAKE, 1-BEDROOM 

apaitmont, all utilities Included, 
except eieciria Clooe n( Ehoppkig 
center. $400/mon1h +Becurtty, 
(706)526-1491. 

LAKE BLUFF- LARGE 1 and 2- 
foedroom apartment fn quiet 
pdvaio an>a. Poo) and ddjhouse. 
$535+up/rnonth. Heal indudod. 
(708)615-9717. 

LAKE MICHIGAN SHORELINE 
2^t)ednxxndoluxo.conclo. garage 
storage, largo 2-acre estate. 
(414) 658^278 or (414)552- 
9488 alter 5pm. 

LAKE VILLA- 1-AND 2Hbe(tTOm 
apaitmerts, targe Mtdien. burvky 
facfity, beach ricfits. From $475- 
$eoo/month. Includes heat. 
(706)356-9112. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large land 2- 

bettoom apartments, Laka VUa, 
$535 and $650/month. Heat 
WBtef ;air hduded. (706)356-6474. 

LARGE FURNISHED MOTEL 

rooms, private bath, deanlng 
service, Cable-TV. Near towa 
Kitchenettes. $110/Wedk. Call 
Lakeview Mote), Twin Lakes. 
(414)877-3043. - 

LAKE BLUFF- VERY taige 2- 
bedroom apaitmart in quiet wel 
managed security complex. 
$500/mo. Garage avallablo. 
(708)473-3931. 



LAKESIDE 

LUXURY 

APARTMENTSI 

•Microwave ovens 
•Washers & dryers - 
■Vaulted ceilings 
•Patios or balconies . 

•Dishwashers 
•Convenient location 

(708) 356-0800 

705Wa1)ef'8EdgeDr. 

Lake Villa, IL 

On Routa 132 (Qcand Ave.) 

Just east of Routa 63 at Ihe 

Boutti akio of Doep LaJcs 

.^^V Pfott»atonally 
^^j m»n»§»tl by 
Uanagtittmnt 
fttltyPunnan 



3SMyiFftS!rWB5uS^a$fi>r 



i 



DEEP LAKE 
HERMITAGE 

rlBedroom Special^ 

Spacious 1 & 2 bed 
room apartments. Free 
gas & cooldng. Wall to 
wall carpet, appliances 
Included. Ample close 
space. Tot lot, tennis i 
basketball court an 
aundry facilities 
each building 

From $545 

149 N.Milwaukee Ave 

Uke Villa, IL 

(708) 356-2002 

Sorry, no pete !SL* 



******A*i 



SAA*<**A*A 



PEBBLESHIRE PHASE 1 




FREE heat & cooking gas. 
APLUSHCARPEHNG 
A MODERN APPLIANCES 
A LAUNDRY FACILmES IN EVERY BUILDING 
* ON SfTE MAINTENANCE 

MINUTES FROM 
HAWTHORN CENTER 

7O8-367-45O4 

695 Westmoreland Dr. 





A):^r1ment3 
For Rent 



APARTKIENT FOR SUB- 
LEASE, Giaysiaie, $73&'h)onlh, 
heat, free oedl chock, 1st moifth 
free. Available Aug.lst. (706) 
548-5013. 

COMPLETELY FURNISHED 1- 
BEDROOIM apartment, ZIon, 
new carpeting, laundry, cable- 
ready, ulUIKea included, 
$465/month. Navy Welcome. 
(706)872-7693: 

COZY STUDIOS AND 1- 

bedroom. Unfumlstted, dooe to 
SL Therese. Heat, not Included. 
No pets. (706) 244-7433. 

FOX LAKE- VERY large 2 
bedroom apartment In quiet wefl 
managed complex $575Anonth 
Includes Heall (708)973^<S44. 

GURNEE-^ BEOROOIri, GOOD 
location, dishwasher, 
wastierAliyer hookii), air, screen 
porch, dadc No pets. References . 
requked. $75Qi^TiaTtfi andsecuty. 
(708)662^141. ^ 



Gumee 

ONE BEDROOMS 
FROM $529 

Pays your 1st month rent 
Swinuning pool 
and cooking gas 

CARRIAGE 
HOUSE 

(708)244-1616 

ShonTam Icuct iviilable 
*new midcnt, 1 yurleaie 



WAUKEGAN 3-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, on street partcfcig, 

$49SVtnonlh. Inchjdea gas. (312) 
336-0199. 

1-BEDROOM APARTMENT 
OVERLOOKING lake, 

$550/hionth. AvaSabte July let. 
(706)526^5206. ' 

2-BEDR60M APARTMENT, 

GRAYSLAKE. No pets, security 
and references required 
$500/month. (708) 358-1898. 

GURNEE: 2-BEDROOM 

apartment FkBptace, basement, 
laundry hook-ups. includes 
rafrigeralor, stove, (fishwasher. 
999 Depot Rd. $7D(Mno. Avdafals 
July 1st. Near Hwy.4l. (708) 
336-1665, home; (7De)937-3161, 
wortc > -■ 

2124 KRBTAN-$490MONTH 

S-Bedfooms. Sectton 8 WBkxxhe. 
(708)623-^07. 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS- »- 
1/2 miles west of CLC on 
Washington St. 2ybedroom, 
carpeted, air conditioned, 
appliances. Heat, water and gas 
Indudod. Lauraty f adBtes. NOT 
Approved for Section 8, No pets 
or Waterbedst $55S/mo. 
(708)326-6i874 

UN»N GROVE. 2BE0nOOMS, 

carpeted, air conditioning, 
appllajKes, Intercom access, 
petlo. No pets. Avalable August 
(414)878-1730. 

UNION GROVE, WL 24)edroom 
apartments. FREE heal. FREE 
\f2 month rent! New carpet. 
CeBng Fan [ Mini bflnds. Close to 
-schools. No pets. From 
$488AT>onlh. (414) B7a-<609. 

VERNON HILLS. CONDOS. 1- 
bedroom (Aug.lst) $625. 2- 
Bedroom, (Sept.1) $660. 
Carpeted, appliances, cerdral 
air, laundry. Quiet aioa &frlr)utas 
from Hawthorn Center. (708) 
272-7449. 



Grayslake . 

1 Bedroom 
Apartments 

**499.00 

pays '1 St mo. rent & deposi 

GRAYSLAKE 
APARTMENTS 

Heat Included 

(708) 223-8870 

'new resklent, 1 yr tease 



H Ingleside S 

j $300 Deposit V 

8 on Ij 

? One & Two Bedrooms B 
2 'Spacious 2 

5 •Private Balconies S 

5 •FREEHeat S 

* 'Short Term Leases avail. S 

H LAKEViEW S 

{apartments 8 

j (708) 587-9277 If 




^ I & 2 Bedroom Spocul 



WATER'S EDGE 
APARTMENTS 

lAr Scenic country setting 
A Stocked fishing pond 

-k Dislinctivelv designed epta. with spacious lloor 

plans & C7A 
ic FREE gas heat, cooking & hot water 
A Picture window kitchens with color coonjinated 

appliances Inc. DAV & new no-wax floors 
A Balcony or patio. Palio verticals Incl. 
•k On-site management/maintenance . 
■k Security buildings/intercom 
■k On-sitB laundry facilities 
k Uinutet from train, 1*94 & shopping 

CALL MARIA FOR APPT. 

708-587-6888 



WESTWIND VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave. 
Zion, IL 

1 Bedroom from $395.00 

2 Becirooms from $495.00 



HEAT INCLUDEDII 

Appliances 

Custom Biljnds 

On-Site Manager 

No Pets 

Call Manager to view 

708-872-5404 




Apartments 
For Rent 




iV Rooms For Rent 



VERNON HLLS, l-fiEOROOM 

deluxe qnttmoft ki smal b(Afti0,' 
No pets, $540Anorth 4«iedrta 
(708)362-0854. 

1 -BEDROOM APARTMENT, 
NO PETS. $525Amonth (708) 
362-3933. 

WAUKEGAN MODERN' 1- 
BEDROOM apartment h qufet 
securly buMrig. Launcfty facBy. 
$425/monlh, (708)69^850. 




AptsJHomes 
To Share 



ROOMMATE WANTED. 

FEMALE prefened, Vernon Hfe 
24)edn)m, l-ia»th towrtiome. 
Washer/diyer, air, non-smoker, 
dean, considwate. references. 
$325/month Indudes utlttles. 
^deposit (706) 54&-7615 afler 
6pm. 



LAKESIDE ROOM, PRIVATE- 
b£th, prfvEla eriranoe, SOQAwaek. • 
(706)356-2747.' 

PRIVATH ROOM FOR RENT. 
Wth house prlveledoes In oMar 
part of Round Lake. SeeMno 
health conllous.cleari and 

reapohsble Indvidual wtw Ites 
animals. Walking dsfance to 
train. $32SAnonth plus securty 
deposit. Evenings alter 6pm. 
(708)546-0825. 

ROOM FOR RENT.$3SOAnorth 

dotijie, $2aMnor<h sinf^, Mbhen' 
prKfedgas, iaurxfty. fluaJ setHriQ. 
Non smoldars praferod. (708) 

2ZJ-2807. 




1^ 



Bus. Property 
FbrSale 



Montello,tVis. 

(just 1 hr. noilh of Madison) 
Close to lake, hunting 
& recreational activity 
excitement. Great 
Business! 

Dagget Realty 
608-297-2171 




Bt», Property 
For Rent 




MUNDELEIN SHOPPING 
CENTER. 575 sqJI. offloe/Mal 
store,- $560/month (312) 
464-1200. 




L/ wCTmunX 



g°3Sl J UiJj<- 

1^ >H^ f^% 







REDWOOD 



(wuot 



' iwf^iswxuw ' 



OVERAU DIMENSIONS; ST-V X 74'-0' 
UVING: 2480 squam fwt 
OARAGE 721 square foot 



REDWOOD (333-040} 
By Landmartc Designs, Inc. 



its lofty portico, supported by slander classical columns, the Redwood creates a strtking first Impres- 
sion. A high-pitched hip roof accentuates the sense of grandeur. 

There's no disappointment once you step Inside. All of the rooms ara la^ and most have high ^rault- 
ed ceillnQS. Only the two secondary t>edn}Qms have flat ceilings. The rnring room is the largest, txight- 
ened by two la^ge street- facing windows. A klcltef corner aeaies an Ideal locaiion far a window seat 

While slightly smaller than the living room, the family room' actually seems larger. The ceiling hoe is 
vaulted toward the center.,Ughl filters down through six rectahgular slcyfights, thr^ on each side of the 
peak. And while the living room Is enclosed, the family room Is wide opea Were it not for the Greplace, li 
would tie hard to tell where the family room ends and the dining room, nook and kitchen begin. Sltdofs 
on the left open onto a railed dock. 

Sink and dishwasher are built Into one side of an eating barihat is easily kmg enough to seat Rve 
people. The dishwasher is raised to the level ol the eating tiar, six or more Inches higher than it>e sink 
and counter. This aikiws kiading and unloading of the dtshwai^ef without the inconvenience of bendmg 
down as kiw as is usually necessary, A large step-in pantry provides eddltnoal storaga space. 

The utility room ts larger than mosL Ainenliies include cabinets, sink, counter arxl a lokl-down Ironing 
board. And this room Is also convenient to the garage, handy for dean-up after working in the shop area 

tn the vaulted master suite, a skylight bathes the private bathroom in soft, natural tIghL Other features 
Include twin lavs, and a spa tub roomy enough for two. Tropfcal plants flourish in this moist, bright envi- 
ronment, on the shelf next to the tub. There's plenty of storage here, too - a linen closet and a tong 
wardrobe. AddtionaJ space for clothing Is in the halfway, just outside the door. 

For a study plan of the REDWOOD (33-040), send $9.00, or for a collection of plan books featuring 
our most popular home designs, sand $20.00 lo Landmark Designs, P.O. Box 2307-LP60, Eugene, OR 
97402. (Be sure to specify plan name & number when ordering.) 



It's that ttme of year to gear up for a giant, spectacular 



mt 




RECEIVE A 

FREE 

GARAGE 

SALE KIT 

INCLUDING: 

•3 Garage Sale Signs 

•A handy garage 
sale ledger 

•Some helpfullips 
for a successful 
Lakeland garage sale 

•Coupon (or $1.00 off 
yourne)ct classified 
ad. 



We want your 
sale to bo fun 
andprolilablo 
Ihoroforo ... 




VISA 



Use this handy coupon or call 

(708)223-8161 ^ 



Name. 



I 

lAddress. 

iDatetoRufi. 



Phone_ 
—City. 
,2p. 



J 



I 



Mail coupon or stop 
by our office at 



l$6.25 for the 1st 15 words. 15e each additional word [ JLRKCldllCL 
I : __l . Newspapers 

I —I 

I 1 



I 



! Prapayment la fJoqulred \ 



30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

Deadline: Wed 10 am 
for Friday publication 



^ July 2, 1993 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



Lakeland Nowspapori47 



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Out Of Area 
Property 



•SKSSKSBfcSSS: 




Bus. Property 
For Rent 



Bu8.ftop«ty 
For Rant 



Hainesville 

15;000 sq. ft. office & 
warehouse space with 
wide store-front. Ideal 
exposure on state 
hwy. Reasonable rent. 
Call 

Forney & Co. 

708-362-2000 



Car Lot 

on Rt. 12 

n Richmond . with 
excellent visibility. Car, 
lot with 1 1/2 bays,, 
detached garage and. 
sales ofdce. SSgS/mo. 

Land 
Management 

815-678-4771 



PRIVATE PAnrrY WANTS: 
BARrrAVERN/ LOUNGE; 
LEASE OR OPTION TO BUY. 
MUST HAVE BASIC 
EQUIPMENT. CALL (708) 
540-B752, It no answer, leave 
messagei ,^_^ 

FOX LAKE OFFICE (or RentI 
Certer o( Downtown. Utilltlea 
Included. (708) 823-4485. 

LAKE VILLA- COMMERCIAL 
zoned. 1 ;a)0-1 ,500 sqJL Heat and 
water p£dd. Slatting $7Da/tnorttt 
,(708)356-6233. 




Vacant Lots/ 
Acreage 



] 



■l! 



Bl 



BUSINESS 



INDUSTRIAL SPACE 



FOUKTAINHEAD 

CORPORATE CENTER 

ON RT. 12 IN RICHMOND 

Superior 2,650 sq. ft 

to 5,100 sq. ft unit 

Overhead door/dock 

A/C Office 

Land management 

(815)678-4771 



THE WINNING TEAM 

jrou 

AND THE 
OASSIFieDS 
'OETrOU 

vmEne you 

WMT 70 CO 




*FOX RIVER FRONTAGE*. 5- 
■cre gorgeous slopped Ms, 
Just iimlmim north of imnois 
bonlsr, Brever Rd, Burlington, 
Wise. Perfect for eipossd 
bassment. Enjoy fishing, 
canoeing, wiid-lifs, and 
picturesque sunset viewal 
Psrc snd survsy Included. 
Land contract- OK. Call for 
Plat $51 .900. Others avanabie 
from $29,900 to$64,900. (414) 
421-*Sa2. 

FARMETTE, 1 1-ACRES, WITH 
toam3, weB & etedric, no house, 
l-mle north of n One, e-mies east 
of Belott, Wl. Priced. $55,000 
(708)395-5853 eves. 

LANDSCAPED LOT. 
LOVELY COUNTRY LOT tor 
Your Exeojtfve Dream Home. 
Located across road from Fox 
Rh/er on Braver Rd., Burtfngton, 
Wise, Just 12-mlniJtes north o1 
llllnots border. Pen: and sunray 
Included. Land Conlract' OIC 
$29^00, Other larger 5 toQ-acro 
tots avaBaUe. Cafi lor Plat today. 

(4^4)42t-as6^ 

NORTHStDE LOT. 100X1S5 

wtth dty sewer arKi water (414) 
654-7932. 



TDPS ON- 

HOW TO WRITE A 



CLASSIFIED 



AD 



SELLS 




1. Use a KEYWORD. This 
immediately tells the reader 
exactly what it is you have to 
sell. 

2. Make your description . 
CLEAR and PRACTICAL. 
State ti^e year, make, model, 
color, size, and tell what 
condlUon Ihe Item is. Also. 

.- state the special feaojres. 

3. State the PRICE. 
Successful Classified 
advertisers have learned 
Ihat the price in an ad helps 
inaease the chances lor 
results. 



4. if there's a genuine 
sense of URGENCY, say 
so. The words, "We're 
Moving" or "Must Sell Fasr 
suggests that readers 
respond immediately. 

5. Indude your PHONE 
NUMBER. Classifieds get 
results fast and often 
generate immediate sales. 
If you cannot be available 
to answer the phone ai all 
times, be sure lo specify 
special calling times such 
as "after 6 PM* or 'Before 
11AM-. 



If you need ossiatanco ask one of our friendly 
AD -VISORS lo help you word your ad. 

Call (708)223-8161 
LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 




Vacant Lots/ 
Acreage 



NOW AVAILABLE- IN John 
Klng^ Emerald Estates, UnR #5. 
Chok» tots wlh d^ waier/sewr. 
Prices Etatt at $38,000 Broudture 
avallal>le upon request. (708) 
546-5211 

SUNDIAL FARMS IN Spring 
Grove, 1-Full ACRE Only 
$39,90<V negotiable. In executive 
homes area. Near beautllut 
wooded Stale Park, by Cftain 
O'Lakes. Call (706). 
9e5-7706fawneftormoiBdataift. 

WINTHROP HARBOR, IN 

Covenant Cove, fuly Iti^Moved 
bulldable lots In area ol fine 
homes, $34,500/each (708) 
872-3678. 




Resorts/ " 
Vacation Rentals 



FOR YOUR VACATION SPOT 

or RENTAL AD TO Appear In 
OUR Monthly Sumrner 
RECfBalton GUIDE. CALL Atteoe 
at (708)223-8161 0X1.140. TWs 
Booklet Is dlstrtxjtod Uiroughout 
IjaKe County at ht^ tiaftto areas 
(Ike Marinas, Resorts, OASIS's) 
lor only $14.50. (25/wd.mln) 
Deadllns for August Issus: 
July 16. 

FOX LAKE- 2BEDROOM 
lownhome Jor Rent or Sale. Pod, 
tennis, boating. Avalable now, 
(708)729-7431. ' 

LAKE GENEVA- 
VACATION home- Just bring 
vour toothbrushl 4th of July 
week Is OPEN! $450AMeit. Gill 
owner. (414)275-3347. 

MODERN SUMMER COTTAGE, 
fully furnished and boat. East 
Ijoon Lake, IL on water, avalafcto 
now ttwough 10/2/93. Month or 
Season Rates. Call (312) 
736-0974. 




( Out Of Area 
Property 



WISCONSIN 
ATTN: DEVELOPERS 

Ona o( iha last frontlsm In Central 
WlBconsln. Tha famous Beall't 
Port-O-Calt Re£or1, 3a acs, 1100' 
undy t)sach, ^0 cabins, rastau- 
rant, bai, elc Ideal recraallonal 
davetopfnert. %32. million. Toims. 
BADGER AMERICAN REALTY. 

414-784-2500 



CO.-Midway Denver & Colorado 
Springs Exec Home. 4bf, 4bth 
ort 5 acs. Trees & great mtn vu. 
Over 4600 s.(. great rm. satellite 
sys., CaJ sfxi hot tub, all appTs. 
Top quality & cond. $398K. 2 
adjoininf^ 5 ac sites also avail, 
303-681-2247 agt 



MAINE 

SEBAGO LAKE Windham 
Waterfront, 3BR cape & 2BR 
ranch, sandy beach, dock, 
renov. Great rental history. 
Two for the price of one, 
$229,900. By owner. 

603-382-7217 



ORANGECOUNTY.VRGNA 
■ANNANDALE" 

A77 ac (arm. 9 rm brick, anlolwl- 
lum homo built around 1604, In 
oxcell. condition. 11' ceilings, 4 
woriilng Irplcs, 3bth, slata roof, 
steam lieal, 5 rm guost cotlaga, 
Irg. bam wrtioreo Btalis. 90% open 
land, pasturo & alfalfa, wall 
fenced. Loc'd 6 mil. fnam James 
l^adison's homo 'Monlpolier*. 
S900K. For Bate by ownor. 

703-832-2758 




ISLAND PARADISE 
MISCAUNO ISLAND, Wise. 

Breathtaking 1.25 wooded (pine, oak & birch) acres with 250 ft. of 
Menominee River waterfront can be yours for $20,000. Enjoy your own 
high-country hideaway on private 82- acre (^iscauno Island, located 200 
miles north of Milwaukee. 28 miles south of Iron Mountain -and east of 
Pembine, Wise. Island boasts a 9-hole golf course, tennis courts, country 
Club, hotel and lodge. For more information call (708) 381-8299 



VERY UNIQUE OCTAGON 

3-(eason laKohome |usl 70 ml. W, 
ol Twin Cftios on beaulKul Lake 
Ripley, This homa w/BS* Dcstir. Is 
sura to bocome a tavorlts tummer 
o'liaway. Jason Watt. MEIER- 
HOFER REAL ESTATE. 615 N 
Sbley, Uichlleld, MN 5535S. 
612-693-8242 or 
612-693-6493 



TENNESSEE 

(East) General 
Longstreet Headquarters, 
Historical Marker, Quality 

partial restoration. 

$250K. Ms. Bise 

(615)581-9300 



Friday, July 2. 1993 



MINNESOTA 

LAKE SUPERIOR HOME 

Spacious laka bom« 20 ml N ol 
Duiulh. 140' trontge on private 4 
ac lot 44- BR, 2 ramlly areas, 2 
fplc. sep dan, DR. LR, much 
more. Over 3600 sq. it In this new 
consmictlon, you can ctwosa the 
decor, $320,000, (218) 834^116 
(owner/bidr). ■"'■'_ 



MASSACHUSETTS 
CAMPING AREA 

INVESTMENT OPPOfnUNfTY 
Top Rated bv Woodall & TraOer Ule. 
Beaut wooded ares In cenual N.E. 
Vhjaty Bfl amsriSes a fadlidet. Svong 
six tgura ROi, Ejpansloo po """ 
HJO&ifiOO. Meridan Marketfn 



six tgura ROi, Expansion pouiUites. 
,oea,00O. Meridan Marketno 

(508) 836-4483 



MICHIGAN 

Lake Mlcliigan watedront cottaoa 4 
hrs. north of Chicago nr, Sdver 
Lake Sand Dunes & picturesque 
Psntwater. 3 BR newly rennodated 
around 100 (t. (rontage, 
exceptional view, owner anxious 
reduced to S172,9O0. Call Wielatra 
Realty, Inc. Shelby, Ml , 

(616)861-2103 



VIRGINIA-FARMVILLE 
(Central Va.) 

Investmenl/Hotlromenl proper- 
ly. 70 complsloly eocluded 
acs. w/40 ac. lake, oil o( 1 1/2 
ml, major hwy., 4 rental hous- 
es w/powsr plan! $32SK, with 
owner financing. 

804-392-4995 



RHODE ISLAND 
JAMESTOWN 

Comp(o1e pv^ In feito«ed Country 
Estate on almost 6 acs 
Wpanoramtc views. Stone walls 4 
pralosslonal landscaping. OulbWgs 
mcl. a 2 car (jar., vwfkahop i horse 
bam. Adcf I acreage avail Qustave 
J.S. White Real Estate Co. 
(401 ) S49-3000 



- IDAHO 

EXTRAORDINARY ESTATE 

7 tnt Inm a id SKI Rasofl wtfWorkrs 
LonoasI Gondola. Custom home 
11969) 4000 + B.L. 5 bf, 3 blh, 26 ac 
yfind aaek, tarn wS horse stalls, htd. 
workshop, Nd. boa bidg. covwDd RV 
parking, b. equ|p. Eiorago btdg., olfice 
Bida.,gpartdnglot$M7K. 

1^00-759-3460 



ARK. N.W.Beaver Lake 

7+ acs. genlle to water. $70K. 
125 acs. beaut. nDlling meadows, 
grsal vus, $1850 p/ac. Diversilied 
oppty's. Univ. & Vetarans 
Hckspitat close by, Excell. place lo 
relire. Dnaam Valley H.E, 1-800- 
682-6909 or wrile: P.O. Box 62, 
Hogers. AR 72757. 



MICHIGAN 

Torch Lake Area 

133 ac. reaeational property 
(open & wooded) 5 yr old 
tiousa, 3 br, 3 bth, pool, spa, 
30'x48' pole barn, trails for 
hiking. Beautiful area, $340K, 

616-264-8375 



MICH.-900 s.f. custom built tog 
home. 10 or 25 acs on Lake 
Michigan, $1.9 million. Norton 
ShoiBS, 2 1/2-3 hrs to Chicago. 3 
level home; 2-5tory indoor watsr- 
lalls, very pvt. One of a kind. Call 
Steve Masiella. CLYDE HEf^- 
DRICK REALTORS, 616-733 
2134 or 616-755-3355 



IDAHO 

Investment Opportunity 
Near Booming Boise 

Beautllul Timbered, Historic 
Idaho Mountain Ranch only 40 
miles Irom Boiso on all woalhor 
highway. Surroundod by 
National Forest: prime hunting. 
Ilshlnq, recreational area. 
Parllally dovolopad; 60 lots 
sold, 55 ac. 36 lot subdivision 
platted, llled & ready to sell, 
260 additional ac. ol limber & 
meadow avail, lor deveiopmenl 
or wilderness retreat. $9D0K 
asking price includes construc- 
tion equip, community water 
system, shop, ouibidgs, etc. 
Terms negottabts, all reason- 
able olleit considered. By own- 
ers with lull courtesy to brokers. 

P.O. Box 190 
Idaho City, ID 83631 

(208) 392-4496 




,i;^ Real Estate Misc, 



NQrnCE_JVIUST SELLI 6STEEL 
BulkJirtgs 25x34. 40x50, 30x40, 
42x60, 50x100. Go FACTORY 
DIRECT. SAVE UP TO 42%. 
Ideal lor Muhl-uses. Summor- 
Fall dottvoty. 1/800-366-2784. 



RECREATIONAL 



tm^^im^p^^immmmft^iiKmimimmiimmm'^r^sfsmwmmm'm^wpfi^ 




Boats/ 
Motors/Etc. 




Recreational 
VeHdes 



FOR YOUR RV or CAMPER 
AD TO Appear m OUR Monltily 
Siimnier RECreallon GUIDE, 
CALL Ariene at (708)223-8161 
8id.140.TM3 eooWat Is dsbtxiled 
throughout Lake County at hlgti 
trafltcanes (l«9 Marhas, Resoits) 
for only $14.50. (25/wd.mln) 
D«adlln« for August iMU«: 
July 16. 

1976 22Fr. ARGOSY Camper 
(made by Alrstream), can be 
lowad with 6-cylMercar. Roeso 
hRch and sway tiaia Included. A- 
1 Condition. $4,300, (70B) 
395-6041. 

1960 NOMAD TFIA1LB1- steeps 

6, ful t»lh wlh shower, (700)395- 
6574. 

RADIO CONTROLLED AIR 

PLANE. 5-1/2ft. wing span. .60 
ongha. Sctiwinn BMX Blea. (706) 
395-2215. 




SnowmoNes/ 
ATVs 



1986 YAMAHA TRI Z250 3 
wtieeler. Best offer. (706)395- 
4737 Batweon 9am and 2pm. 

19S8 WET BIKE TOMCAT, 
$1 ,700 or best offer. (706) 
497-3796 attsr 7pm. 




■ Boats/ 
Motors/Be. 



OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAia 

CERTIFIED Mecanlcat Mobile 
Shop NEED HELPr? Cal (708) 
567-90B0. 

SAILBOAT- HOBIE-CAT 
HOLDER 14. (706) 367-5350. 

FOR YOUR BOAT AD TO 

Appear h OUR Mo r«My Sumner 
FECroalJon GUIDE, CALL Ariene 
at (708)223-8161 ext.140.Thls 
Bo<Met Is dstrtiutod throughout 
Lake County at high traffk; areas 
(flke MartnasI) foronty S14.50. 
C2S/wdmli) Deadline tor August 
Issue; July 16. 

12FT. BUTTERFLY SAILBOAT, 
excellertt condltton, $1 ,250 with 
trailer, S975/wtihout. Includes 
fleet neajt)y. (708) 945-5492. 
12FT. KOLIBRI SAILBOAT 2- 
sails and trailer. $995. (708) 
.848-3446 evenings. 

1968 SEA SPRITE CABIN 
Cmteer. 4-cy1lndor Mercury, I/O 
$6.000(706)667-9122. 

1991 MONTERY 206 CUDDY 
wtth Iraller, 260hp,V-5, stereo, 
radio, low hours, ski toys 
Included ,$17,500 or best offer, 
(706)590-0650. 

1992 SKEETER BASS Boat, 
ir6', IISMetc, New, $14,900 
(708)567-4591, : 

2-JET SMS WITH TRAILER, 
1988 550, 1986 300, well kept, 
excellent condlttan, $5,5O0A>est 
Oder. Wl not separate. Kevhjeves 
or weekends. (414) 877-4265. 

21Fi. SAILBOAT, 3«AtLS, 
trailer, dinghy, molor. $2,250. 
f708) 866-831 3. 

1978 2aFT. DEEP-V Sea Ray, 
228hp, E-Z Loader iraller. 
$3.fi00A)est or TRADE (708)567- 
7707. 

19e2SEA RAY, 19n. 228 hOTCG, 
I/O, Excellent condition. Only 
GOtTOura. $6ffX) (708) 382-2896. 
1963 18' AMERICAN 
WELLCRAFT bowrklor, VQ, with 
traler, mooring covers, oowertbte 
covers & extras, $5,500. (708)395- 
3554. 

1986 BAYLINER CAPRI 2in. 
Open bow, Volvo I/O. Mint 
condlkxi, 1 -owner. Many extras. 
Musi soil $12,000A)ost (706)S66- 
2377,(706)244-1655. 

1986 MASTERCRAFT SKI- 
BOAT, power slot, 300 hours, 
good shape, $14,900. Bob (414) 
877-9002 or (706)724-3131 . 

1986 VtP 19FT,Open BowV-6, 
175hp like now, 1-owT>er. many 
extras, $7,995 Days (708)832- 
6700 or Eve3-(708) 381-5866. 

TRY IT BEFORE YOU BUY m 
17ft. Glaslron with tialer, 140hp- 
Merc. O/B, Many extras. $3,000 
(706) 395-7319 leave message. 

BASS BOAT- HYDRO Spoil, 
17-1/2 n. I20tp Johnson, toadod, 
$6.500 (414) 862-6989. 

BAYLINER SARATOGA, 1979, 
needs to be adopted! 25ft. with 
trailer; stand-up cabin sleeps- 
4; oteciric hook-up; dinette; 
rnlcrowave; standup enclosed 
head; massko sloreo (anVfm. 
CD-ptayer with 400watt amp); 
electronics (VHF/CB/ Haller/ 
Dopthsoundor); twin Votvo ISO's 
wllh Volvo Penta outdrives; new 
camper canvas; many exiras; 
wet msHakibd Roady lo Laundi 
Asking $10,000- but let's talkl 

(708) 358-8953. 




Boats/ 
Motors/Etc, 



BOAT AND TRAILER- 18fl. 
ribergtass Deep-V Runabout, 
140hp Evfnrude SIrtgfe Axle DfOy 
trailer, Many Extras. $3,900 
Contact Ga/y. (708) 669-4789. 

BOATi ir BOWRIDER- VO. full 
cuitalns'raSer, ski equipment, 
mint corvOton, $6,350. (706)362- 
5765. -__ 

BOAT- 1968 FABUGLAS. 85tp, 
outboard motor, live wal, open 
bow, Spaiten baler, only In water 
Shre. (706) 263-1240. 

BO AT- 1 968 BAYLINER, 65hp, 
Force ktotor and tialer, (4l4) 
694-2676. 2708 -85th St. 

CENTURY 4000-1981 2111 W«h 
st^to-shore radk>, full camper 
canvas, porta-potty, mooring 
cover, amtm cassoBe, &Z Loader 
trafier. $8,500/best offer (706) 
362-4151. . 

JET SKi-1992 YAMAHA JS660, 
mint condition, low hours, 
accessories Included, custom 
graphics package. $3,400 flrni. 
Andrew. 1-800-225-5638315- 
675-2712. 

JETSKL199tWaveninneril,fasl ^ 
and fun, souped up, mint 
condition, locks and cover 
Muded. Used l-sumter, Bou^ 
new In 1992. (706) 452-5640. 
LIKE NEW 1990 tishlng boat, 
motor and trailer, one owner. 
14' Staraaft, 25 hp Mariner, 
electric start, Mercury trolBng 
motor, bottomllne fish fir>der. 3 
swivel seats, live- well and 
Shorelander Iraler. asking $4 jOOO. 
Cal efvertigs eAer Spm. (706)336- 
0857. 



SEA RAY 21 FT. Cuddy cabin. 
Tandem trailer, 210 englrio, . 
Inlerfase Loran Locator and 
ma/tne radto. AD new ISOhours. 
$7,500/or. trade. A must Seel 
(708)362-4626 ext241. (708) 
735-^319 

SPEED BOAT- FOUR Winns, 
Horizon 190, E-Z Loader trailer, 
(414) 87ft^500 ask for Mike. 

TAYLOR, 1987 SKI/SPEED 
boat, 21lt. 7.4 liter; 454 
MerCrulsor, Bravo I, lA!), with 
easy roll iraOer, $13,000 (708) 
526-7848. 

IKIMJNKZRIVIERA, ig7521fL 
Trt-hull, walk-thru wlndshlek)^ 
Irfcoarl 225tp MeiQiiser engine, 
power tn and tifrn, good oondbon, 
$2.45ate8loller(7O6)34a-O0S2. 

1973 25' CRUISERS, INC. 
Seafarer wthtraier, MorCmlser. 
I/O, sleeps 6, bathroom and 
galley, good oontfitoa $4,500 or 
best offer. (615)455-9298. 




Camping 



20FT. CAMPER T1VULER, 1976 
GoUen Nuggal, ful seV cortalned, 
air condlttonlnig. Very Clean, 
$2,200. Call (708) 223-1497. 




Sports 
Equipment 



8FT. POOL TABLE, not slate, 
$275/ best offer. (708) 356-10)9 
leave message. _^ 

GOLF CLUBS- MENS set and 

bag, $96. Lades set and bagt $90; 
Go! Bala. $3tiz. (708) 295-1387. 

SOLOFLEX WITH LEG 
extent Ion, IDce new. New prk» 
$1 ,200, win sell for $800. (708) 
380-0720. 



TRANSPORTATION 



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Cars For Sale 




Cars For Sale 



C H e A P I 1982 HONDA 
ACCORO Hatchback, 5-spoed. 
Moving Must Sefll Best Offer. 
(708) &49-a434. 

CAMARO. 1960 SUNROOF, 

sporty spoiler, new paint, runs 
ffleati $2,200 (708) 587-3496. 

CHEVROLET- 1990 LUMINA 
EURO, shaip rod, 4door. $8,500 
or best. (414)662-6452. 

1986 CHEVY CELEBRITY 

Eurosport, rww motor, asking 
$3,800 Call Randy (708) 
662^155. 

4WD CHEVY SUBURBAN, 

lodgauts, am^ veiy good shape, 
30,000/mlIes on new motor. 
$3,250 (708) 566-5737 or 
(708)54 &-&400 Ask tor Steve, 

1988 FORD MUSTANG LX, 2 

ck>or,4 cylinder, 5 speed, am/fm 
stereo cassette, rear defroster, 
. new mag wheels and tires, low 
miles, always garage kept, 
Immacuiale inekie and out, perfect 
graduation gilt. (706)808-7432. 

1988 HONDA PRELUDE 2.0St, 
4-whe6l steering, 5-speed. 
absojuteV baded. 60K, excelent 
condition, Must Seell (708) 
816-6369. __. 

1988 PWSTANG GT, Corwertbte, 
red wtth while top, kiw-kjw miles. 
(708)587-1210. 

1988 TOYOTA CELICA ST. 5- 

speed, red, air, Thule blke/skl 
rack, orighal Calfomla car, great 
shape. $5;g00. (708) 949-1693. 

1989 CUTLASS CALAIS- 2 
door, power. AAD, auto, cruise, 
quad 4, anVfm cassette, exoeDerl 
condition, $4,695 or best. 
(me)5S&W66 Of (708)9490737. 

1969 HYUNDAI EXCEL, 4 door, 
sunroof, air, new dutch/brakes, 
excelleni concltkxi, $2,500. (706) 
548-1663. 

1989 NISSAN SENTTtA 2-door. 
4-speod, low mileage, good 
condltktn, asking $4,000 (708) 
680-7664. . 

1990 CHEVY CORSICA LT2- 
4 door, excellent condition, 
automatic, air, oulse, 48,000 
miles, warranty, many extras, 
$7.000. (414)689-4014, 

1990 HONDA CIVIC- 2 door, 
air, automatk:,cmese, red wtth 
black windows, very clean, 
$6.500. (414)534-6090. 

1990 LUMINA EURO 3.1L, V-6, 
k>aded, 60K, extended warranty, 
excellent condltkin. $6.g00A)est 
(615) 363-6376. alter 5pm, 

1990 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE, 
46,000/mlles, automatic, air, 
survroof. ciulse, $7.000tibest offer 
(414) 656-1263. 



1990 REATT/V, RED wtth tan 
leattier, oxcalleri inskje arxJ out, 
cellular phone, super dean. 40K 
miles. $4&,(X}0/best. Cal Brian 
(312) 461-0513 (Chicago). 

1991 GEO STORM 5-speed, 
$6,800 Call Don Mon-Fri 7am- 
3:30pm (708)668-2460 or 414) 
862-6954 ,afler 5pm. 

BUICK 1984 LE SABRE 305 
engina. 49.00(Write. Extra dean. 
$3,500 (414)633-4936, (414) 
634-1251. 

1986 Ct/TLASS SUPREME. 3.8 
liter, new fuel punp. stmts, cam, 
rebuRI heads, no rust. Loaded. 
$25.0Q0A)est. (708) 497-3160. 

1986 DELTA 88 ROYALE 
Brougham. 1 -owner, fun power, 
wtth everything and battier seals 
too! StBI a great car. Come see, 
$3.800 (708) 395-6993. 

1936 PONTIAC 6000LE, 
automatic, good oondUon. $3,200 
or best offer. (706) 336-5085. 

1987 BMW 325, Loaded SuTDOl, 

perfect condHkinl $10,000 (706) 
680-1571. 

1987 CUTLASS SUPREME 

Original owner. V-6. air, cruise, 
tilt, rear defrost, am/lm, gas 
shocks, new extaust, white with 
burgandy Interior, excelleni 
condition. $6,000 Days (JOB) 
662-7878 or eves (708)244- 
6429. 

1987 RENAULT ALLIANCE. 4- 
Door, automatic. 1.7 engine, tilt 
wheel, air, very clean, Low 
mileage. MUST SELLl 
$1.70abe5t offer (815) 363-0009. 

1988 DODGE ARIES, White 
With malhcing hub caps, 
automatic. 4-door, power steoftng 
and power brakes. Excellent 
condition. $3,000. (708)263- 
1646. or leave message, 

OLDSMOaiLE- 1990 ROYALE 
88, Clean wllh42.0OOAnlles, air, 
crul^. 4-door, V-6. Maintained 
by dsaier. $8,900 (708)263-1110. 

PLYMOimt, 1984 VOYAGER, 
standard transmission, 150K 
nios, newer engine, Claaa (414) 
652-0561. 

PONTIAC, 1 967 LEM ANS, red 
hardtop, runs good, extra parts, 
Asking $2,500A]est oiler (708) 
459r4029. 

PONTIAC- 1989 GRAND PRIX 
l£, $fl.600/best otter. 49,000 
miles. Excellent condition, Musi 
selll Call Chris or Jell (414) 
694-7195. 

STOCK CAR 1962 Olds Cutlass 
set up, rolling chassis $400. 
Must See! Call Ye Olde Hotel 
(414) 763-2701. 



, .X 



Lakeland Newspapers 49 






.July 2. 1993 



M 



it,-. 
■ » - 1 



i" I 



1 . 



I- 



<» 






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TRANSPORTATION 



^gtrj*s??igjaB*^^!^!^s?t>sjiJ^y<g?wnaaj^^ . 




Cars For Sflla 



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CafB For Sale 




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Care For Said 




Semco & Paris 




TrudcB/TraSefB, 



Cars For Sale 




I 



Cars For Sale 



1982 FORD EXP, sunroof, 
hatdibacic, 4-sp6ed, red, good 
condition, Seoo/ofler. (708) 
265-0895. . 

1083 8UICK RIVtERA. loaded, 
no rusi, rww paint, tires, 75,000 
miles origlnal/hfghway. 
$a;aOQbest otter, Wot1<(7oe}68a- 
6833 leave messago. After 
,4:30PM (708) 360-0286. 

19B5 PLYMOUTH DUSTER, 
slick- shut, needs some work, 
$500 llrm. (708) 546-4802, 
(708)949-4029. r- - 

1985 RENAULT ALLtAI^CE 

107.000 mites, body and Irrlertor 
great condition. Runs great. 
Asking $1.700A)e3t oiler. (708) 
473^1747. 

1971 AMC JAVEUN SST, 304, 
air, automatic. Must see to 
appreciate. (414) 551-0478 alter 
4pm, " 

1971 TOYOTA CELtCA Runs 
good, $300; 1976 Lincoln 
Continental, exceltent condUon, 
No rust, mns great, $900, (708) 
740-2539. _„^_ 

DODGE, 1 963 SHADOW, 1 1 ,000 

mites, air, power steerifigfcrakBS, 
5<speed, cassette, extended 
warranty, rustprooling, $8,700 
(414) 553-9097. 



AFour Star Treatments 

Good Credit? Bad Credit? 

BUY HERE 

PAY HERE 

■86 Sunblfd ..$1995 

79 Ral Convortble. ,.»2995 

'85 Saab 900S „ .43995 

'84 Pont. Flera 534B5 

85 ThundotbW Cpe„.„,-.:$2995 
'BS Mercury Marquis „,..,„..$3995 

'B4 V.W. QTI. ..W495 

'85 V.W. ConvortibJa ..$4995 

'83 Cadillac Sod DoV)llo „..$2495 

'&6 Olds Fifonza, $2995 

■83 Ford Conversion Van -$3995 
•86 Ftoro V^_ ..$4995 

86 Ciera EES.„.. _..$499S 

'84 AMC ASIianco. ...$1995 

•85 Dodge Cotl -..$1995 

■82 Toy«a CeJca 41995 

'87 Olds 98 Rogoncy 45495 

lyiARQUARDT 
OLDS, HYUNDAI, VW 

I0nm.4lBt 
Washlnston St., East exit 
iGumee,IL(70e)249<1300^ 



1 072 BUICK SKYLAflK, ^<loor, 
3S0V<8, automatic, powar 
windows, mns and drives welt. 
Asking $800. Alter 4pm (708) 
223-6403. 

1973 VOLKSWAQON CUSTOM, 

wa( btack, fber^ass whale tal and 
fenders, moon roof, excellent 
oondlon, nrs gsat, mary extras, 
extra engine. $2,900. (708) 
65&-11S9. ^__ 

1976 BLAZER, BODY In 

excelent oorxWon, molof rebuilt, 
transmission rebuilt, 4-wtieet 
drive, works greal, great mnrter. 
$1 ,700/besl otter. Ask for Wally 
(708) 587-6189 alter 6PM. 

1975 OLDS CONVERTIBLE, 
Florida car, new lop, tires and 
brakes, very clean In/oul 
$4ffXMX)sl otter. (706) 838-6620. 

1976 CADILLAC COUPE DE 

VtLLE, excetlenl condUon, 40,000 
original miles, asking $5,000. 
(708)336-6031. 

CHRV^LER 1992 LEBARON 
Convertible, loaded: Leather, 
power, very dean, ort/ 14(MTiles. 
Best offer. Must see toappradatel 
Bt Owner (414) 652-0847. 

CHRYSLER LEBARON 
CONVERTIBLE, 1964, rebuilt 
engine, newer muffler, newer 
top, Soriy stereo cassette, Mo rust, 
low miles. Ready for summer 
FunI $3,300/or best offer. Bob 
(708)587-5370. ' 

1976 CORVETTE STINGRAY, 
Must selll ExiremeV dean, mint 
condltten, garage kept. Asking 
S7.200 (708) 746-5078 or 
(70B>886-4090-pager. 



1870 BUICKSKYLABK- 350 V- 
8, 94,000 mfles. new palnl, mns 
and tooks good, $1 .500 or best 
offer. (414)537-4430. 

1970 CHEVELLE 2-DOOH 

hardtop, 307 V-8, 64K original 
n«es, ioo%or1^natandln9'eat 
condlilon tor restorallon. Best 
offer (7 08)436-7468. 

1964 BLACK NISSAN 300ZX, 
good condUon. power eveiyihing; 
93fiOaibesi oner. (708) 5S7-G44Z 



1984 OLDS CUTLASS, 
AUTOMATIC, FULLY 

EQUIPPED, EXCELLENT 
CONDITIONI SUPER 

DEPENDABLE^ RUNS GREATI 
$2,000 (70B) 395~j»924. 

1984 PONTIACSUNBIRO, fresh 
engine, $1,550 or best. (708) 
395-2633. ' 

1984 SAAB 9005, sun roof, 
automallc,4HiQor, runs great, 
no rust, good condlilon, $2,500 
or best offer (414) 248-6594. 

19B5 DODGE DAYTON A Tuibo, 
black, no rust, 83,ooo/hilte3, new 
clutch and turbo, $3,800 1993 
KAVI^ASKI Nlnla 600R 
Mototcyde, MUST SELL! $3,800. 
(708)473-1209. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
BODIES. Factory new, 
guaranteed Irom $1 ,300. Doors 
from $89.00; Fenders from 
$50.00; Beds from $600; Bed- 
liners $169. BUMPERS, 
GRILLS. REPAIR PANELS, 
PAINTS, ABBRASIVES, 
WINDSHIELDS. RADIATORS. 
DelKrery. MARK'S 217-824-6184. 

FORD LARIAT XLT 1991, all 
olkxs, eooceltent sftape (414)85&- 
2193 atter 5 pm. 



- ig77BM320l,2tdoor,auiom3flc, 

gobd coodBon, fur« good. $1 ;400 
or best otter (414) 248-6594. 

1977 FIAT HARDTOP, 

ConvertWo, black, 4-speod, No 
rustl Good condition, $1,200 
(708)336-1031. 

1977 UNCOLN MARK V, 56,700 
mfles, marry new pails. $3,000 
or best (708)436-5075. 

1978 PONTIAC TRANS AM, 

black with black Interior, $2,900 
(708) 356-2807 alter 6pm. 

1980 CADDY COUPE doVHIe, 
$1,000 or bOSt. 1979 CHEVY, 
BodyiTtans special, medtankaOy 
all new, $3,SO0/be3t. Let^ Talkl 
call Mel (708) 836-2243. 

1980 CHEVY 1/2-TON ptekup, 
automatic, long bed, mns good 
looks fair. $1195/negotlable. 
(708) 223-8746. 

19B0 FIREBIRD, RED, T-top, 
V-6. automatic, $1 ,600 flna (708) 
526-0066. 

1980 PORSCHE 924 Turbo, 
rebuilt engine, new tires, new 
paint, asking $4,200 (414) 
539-3676. 



19B1 CHEVY MALIBU- now 
tires, new exhaust, rebull 305, 
v-8, $600. 
(708)336-4280. 

19B1 FIAT X19, Mid-engine 
corvertbte. Sspeed, Adul tWven. 
low mileage, never driven In 
vAtor, Exoeient oondtkxv $3;250. 
(708)587-^51 ■ 

1961 MUSTANG, $250 CALL 
HENRY (414) 889-4328, after 
5pm. 

FORD- 1989 PROBE; dark Uue, 
automatic, air, cruise, tIR, great 
condlten, must seel $6,200A}est 
(414)63^-3329. 

MUST SELLl 1985 Toyota MR2. 
1986 Motor, $2.500*est. 1977 
TRANS AM, $2,500*e3t. 1983 
YAMAHA Maxlmun 550 Ike new, 
$1.40abest (706) 244-0710. 

DODGE CHARGER, 1963, 

80.000 mites, air, very reilabte. 
$80at»st ofler. (708) 546-5855. 



(4)1969 BRAND NEVIf Turbo 
Porsche wheels, $600 (708) 
356-6131. 

FOUR MOPAH MAGNUM 500, 
14 inch &spoka wheels. Odgfna] 
late 60*8 with cap and trim rbigs. 
Excettent condition with minor 
bumps and bmises on mourt. 3- 
Cooper Cobra OO-serles tires in 
great low r/Jte condnion. $350 
or best takes aA. Call After 6pm 
(708)587-8670. 

T-TOPS FOR 1978 CORVETTE. 
BEST OFFER. (815) 653-2307. 




Vans 




Classic 
Aniique Cars 




ft4 LEBARON CQNVT. 

Rebuilt engine, newer muffler, brakes, lop. Sony 
sicreo/caiscllc. No rust, low railci. Red and ready for 
summer. $3,300 or best offer. Call Bob 

(708) 587-5370 



Good News 

' ft 



Bad Credit! 



•Divorced? 

'No Credit History? 

•Bankrupt? 

We can help! 

By calling today, 

you could be 
driving tomonow! 

Call 
708-360-5000 

AskrfnrMr.Stewert 



1959 CM)ILLAC, 4-D06r, flat 
top, enG^ and trans ovethauled, 
bod/ good, needs inteilor work, 
$3,995 or best oiler (708) 
526-6770 days or (708)526- 
2837 eves. .' '''-.. 

igC7 DODGE CHARGER. 383 
CID, automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, sllvor with black 
interior. Asking $2,500. Must 
Sen! (708)587-1964. Please calt 
alter 5:30pm or leave message. 

PONTIAC- 1969 RREBIRD, no 
rust, good oondlton, 80K odgkial 
miles. MUST SEE! $2,500/be3t 
offer. WHI conskler trade. (414) 
552-2747. 



1985 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER, 

57.000/mtles, fully loaded with 
everything. Excellent condition. 
$4.500Jbesl. (708) 655-0199. 

1987 CHEVY CONVERSION 
van, 45,000/miloa,. Excellent 
lamlly vehlcte. (706) 356-8265. 

1990 DODGE CARAVAN, auto, 
air, am/lm stereo, S-passengor, 
$7ff»t)esl otier. (7PB) 740-8331 . 

CHEVY, 1989 CONVERSION- 
VAN, fuBy loaded. Iront and rear 
heat and air, captains chairs, 
TV/VCR hookup, luggage rack. 
Vacation roadyl $9,400. (708) 
623-2681. ^ 

VANS FOR SALE- 2,1^1 Ford 
Club wagon Chateau an 1978 
same mode!. Both need work. 
$795 lor both. (414)279-6777 
or alter 6pm (708) 587-7444. 



'76 CMC 2-1A2-TQN DUMP 

TRUCK, automatic transmfesJon 
400-ga8 engine, good working 
truck, $4,000/ba8t (708)' 
546-3720. - 

*•* MOVINQI *r MUST BELLI 
Brand new QMC StI. Pickup 
beds, with burrfters, $550/eachl 
ONLY 2-LEFTI Old 
CommotTweailh Edison truck 
wHh 42(1. Polaeat, Boom and 
crana, $3,500. Call Mika, pager 
i(70B}612-9SS7 leave your 
numbar for return call or call 
•vanlnoa (708)213^770. 

1976 STRAIGHT AXLE 

INTERNATIONAL truck, rebuilt 
gas enghie, 22ft. encktsed Claik 
cargo box, $2,500 takss U (414) 
877-2276. 

1984 FORD HEAVY Duty 1-ton 
dual wheel with 1011. flat rack, 
sppiQX. 78,500 mlas, good ahepe, 
$4,295 (414) 857-7971 days, 
(414)857-7114. AFTER 6pm. 

1986 CHEVY PICKUP S-10 4- 
speed, very low mfles, Ike new. 
White and red. Asking $3,000 
(708)666-0317. 

1986 TOYOTA LONG bed wHh 
cap, good body, newer box, no 
rust, seized engine, 199,000 
mllos. $1,000 (708) 356-3631. 




Motorcydee 




Trdcksn"railGr3 



I 



Saturn 
o/Waukegan 

500 S. GrccD Bay Road 
Waukegin 




Saivico & Paits 



CLASSIC QUARTER PANEL 
SALE. Mustang. Camaro, Nova, 
Chevelle, Cutlass, Mopars, 
Pontlac. Chovroiet, morel Taink 
pans, lioorpans, doors, fecKlefs, 
bumpers. New and Caittomla 
rusl (rae. MARK'S PLATING 
AND SUPPLY, 217-824-6184. 

(4)"GR0UND HAWQ" TIRES 
on rims. Size 18.5/44-16.5LT, 
Mint condition. Asking $1,000. 
(700) 662-51 1 3 leave message. 

1980 CUTLASS SUPREME 
FRONT CUP. Very Clean $250. 
(708) 567-8772. 



1989 FORD F-150 XLT, Larial, 
black, red inlertor, V-8, 62K, 4x4, 
new rtms. Mint condHlor), $9300 
(708) 356-1600 aam-7pm. 

4WD CHEVY SUBURBAN. 
Lockouts, am/fm, very good 
shape, 30,000/mlles on new 
engine. $3,250 (708) 566-5737, 
(708)549-6400. ask tor Steve. 

DAUNTLESS JEEP V-6, 400 

trans and transfer case, cylkkjca 
rusty, $100 (708) 587-7669. 

GMC 1BFT. STRAIGHT TRUCK. 
1987 excellent runner, good 
body, clean, $6,300 (708) 
662-2044. 

REINFORCED BLACK 
FIBERGLASS cap for full size 
Chevy pkdcup tnick, $350. (708) 
- 395-9995. 



19S2 HONDA 750 Nighthawk, 
blue, good corKHkm, only 1 7,000 
mBes, $1 ,200 or best offer Cal 
Mike. (708) 587-7278. 

1982 YAMAHA 650, 4 cyfrtder. 
shafl drive, wlndshiekl, newtkes, 
trunk, crash bars, 19,750 mHos, 
$1,075. (815)676-4429. 

1988 NINJA 600R, very fast, 
$1800 imn. (414)279-^01. 

YAMAHA- ROUIB 66 250, 1969, 
transferabk) wananty, very low 
mies, bought brand new in 1 992. 
Moving lo Alaska, must set aooa 
(414) 694-5797. 




Wanted To Buy 



LOOKING FOR REASONABLY 

priced 4-wheeler/dlr1 BIKE, thai 
you/1 would feel safe letting a 
8-10^.o!d rWe on Farm laJrwl, 
(backyard). Under $200. Call 
atter 5:30pm (70a)949-0415. 

WANTED TO BUY- CASH PAD 
FOR USED AUTO. (708)223- 
1873. 





Antioch 

Dr. Paul A. Cedar, 
president of the Evangelical 
Free Church of America will 
speak at the Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church, 
42429 N. Tiffany Rd., 
Antioch, on Sunday, July 4 . 
at 10 a.m. Dr. Cedar is an 
author, pastor, evangelist, 
and serves on the boards of 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School and Trinity College 
in Deerfield. He has leclui^ 
at a number of colleges, uni- 
versities, and theological 
seminaries both here and in the United States and in other 
parts of the world. Dr. Cedar is the aulhor of seven books 
including the recently released volume "Where Is HomcT' 
The public is cordially invited to join the Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church congregation. 

Mundelein 

The Faith Lutheran Church, 1966 Hawley St., 
Mundelein, will be holding then- annual Vacation Bible 
School from Monday, June 28 through Friday, July 2. The 
sessions will begin at 6:30 p.m. each evening and will 
close about 8:30 p.m. This year's program is once again 
open to all ages, including adults. If mterested in joining in 
a week of worship, music, crafts, bible study and recre- 
ation, call the church office at 566-8941. Regular Sunday 
services are 9 a.m., followed by Sunday School at 10:15. 



Gray slake 

The United Protestant Church (United Methodist- 
United Church of Christ), 54 S. Whitney St., Grayslake. 
Worship: 8:15 and 10:15 a.m., Sunday. Church School 
through sixth grade: 10:15 a.m„ Sunday. Registration is 
underway for Vacation Bible School to be held July 12 
through 16. Call for details at 223-8131. 



Wauconda 

Have recent events changed the status of Christian citi- 
zens? Are they now relegated to the far right and seen as a 
threat? Such questions as these will be handled by Con- 
gressman Phil Crane, State Representative Al Salvi and 
former Slate Representative Penny PuUen at the 4th of July 
forum at the Evangelical Free Church of Wauconda at 7 
p.m. Ample opportunity for audience questions. will be 
provided. Also, the panel will stay for the reception follow- 
ing for those who would like to meet them and speak with 
them directly. Each of these elected officials speak out on 
pro-family values and Penny Pullen presently heads the 
Illinois Family Institute. The public is invited to attend. 
The church is located oh Rte. 176 at Anderson Rd. in Wau- 
conda. For more information call the church at 526-8254. ■ 



Island Lake 

First Community Congregational Church, 217 W. 
State Rd., Island Lake announces its Summer Sunday Wor- 
ship Schedule. 8:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study. 9:30 a.m. 
Worship. Child care is provided throughout the morning. 
July 10, July Jamboree, music on the lawn in the after- 
noon; Wednesdays in August, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Young Par- 
ent's Lab; Tuesday, Aug. 10, Tots Tuesday Vacation Bible 
School, 9 a.m. to noon, three to five years old; Saturday, 
Aug. 21, Chicago bus trip with Dr. Bill Leslie; Sunday, 
Aug. 29, 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Rally; Sunday, Sept. 
12 Fall schedule resumes. 



SJ'^S^M^SM^MSSMSM^MSMSISJ^ISISM^SJSMSMSl^ 



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THE BIG ROCK OUT 



Saturday July 10, 1993 
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Come Rock With The Flock 

' VICTORY '93 

July 11-14 with Apostle F. Nolan Ball 

Sunday 10:00 a.ni. 

Monday - Wednesday 7:00 p.m. 



THE ROCK OF ROUND LAKE 

913 V\^. Rollins Rd. • Round Lake Beach, EL 
740-7625 (For Information) 



{S^MSEMSMS^MSISE^ISMSMSMSlSlBJSMSM^^Mm 



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ghaii^ofLakeg 

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH 

Sunday Worship 

The Bible: America and the Bible 
8:15 & 10:45 AM 

9:45 AM Christian Education 
Evening Service 6:00 PM 

Dr. Paul Cedar, President of the 

Evangelical Free Church of America and 

concert by THE CATHEDRAL BRASS 

Ice Creani Social afterwards 

(708) 838-0103 or 0104 
CHURCH LOCATED AT 23201 W. GRASS LAKE ROAD 



iryou would like to 
advertise your next 
Church activity here/ 
Please call (708) 223-8161 




50 Lakeland N0w«paper« 



Friday. July 2. 1993 





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Spotlight will shine on new complex in August 



by GREG MILLER 

Lakeland Newspapers 

It's coming soon. 

After 3 1/2 years in the making with a 
production budget of over $2 million and 
a huge supporting cast, the Liberty viUe 
township Soccer Complex (LTSC) will 
premiere in August. 

It'll be quite a show. The script calls 
for 15 fields, picnic areas and shelters, a 
playground, sand volleyball courts, jog- 
ging and biking paths, nature trails, am- 
ple parking! paved roadways, a mainte- 
nance building.^d a complex center — 
all on a 1 15-acre spread. 

Organizations from Green Oaks, Lib- 
ertyville, Metawa, Mundelein and Vernon 
Hills will use the complex,. in addition to 
the Carmel and Liberty ville high school • 
teams. 

It's estimated that over 3,000 players 
are ready to take to the fields. Two of the 
fields will have lights for this fall; ulti- 
mately, four fields will be lighted for 
nighttime play. ' 

The final seven fields and the complex 
center are to be completed this summer. 
The center will include a concession area, 
restrooms and office and meeting facili- 
ties. 

Such a large undertaking has, of 
course, taken a concerted effort 

"We've had a lot of volunteers," said 
Dick Stone, fund-raising chakman for the 
project "It's been a real community effort 
— everybody has pitched in and helped 
out." 

While elbow grease — like digging 
fence post holes, for example — has been 
supplied by many, the big bucks and 
donated services and materials have come 
from larger concerns. 

Some of the big contributors include 
the Libertyville Lions, the Libertyville 




The.boom In the popularity of soccer at all levels played a cer Complex, set to open Aug. 28-29 — Photo by Gene 
major role in the creation of the Libertyville Township Soc- Gabry 



Junior Women's Club, Mike Werchek, 
J.-R. Myers, Oiren Pickell, Herky's Truck- 
ing, Libertyville High School, Abbott 
Laboratories, the Village of Vemon Hills, 
Motorola, Coca-Cola, American Airlines, 
Peter Baker & Sons, Fella Windows and 
Doors, the Bank of Northern Illinois, 
McDonald's, the Lake County Bureau of 
Tourism, David McCallum Associates 
and Pearson, Brown and Associates. 

But even with all that help, the LTSC 
is still about $500,000 short of its fund- 



raising goal. Stone said the response of 
some major corporations in the area has 
been disappointing, but the group is un- 
daunted 

"Thii>gs went a little more slowly 
than we thought as far as fund raising," 
Stone said. "I think when people come 
and see what we have here more donations 
will come in." 

Stone said weekend tournaments fea- 
turing teams from far and wide will be. a 



boon to local restaurants, motels and 
.other businesses. 

The grand opening of the complex — 
bounded by Rte. 45 and Peterson and 
Winchester roads — is set for Aug. 28- 
19, - 

Lakeland Newspapers has. also joined 
the LTSC effort. For each subscription 
started with the Libertyville News, 
Mundelein News or Vernon Hills News 
through July 18, Lakeland Newspapers 
will donate $5 to the LTSC. 



Clay finds silver fining 
in national cycfing meet 



15 
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2,19 


93 



Libertyville grad Bill Clay took a 
silver medal at United States Cycling 
Federation (USCF) National Track 
Cycling Championships. Over 400 of 
the best cyclists in the country com- 
peted at the Major Taylor Velodrome 
, in Indianapolis last weekend. 

*'I thirik Bill should be extremely 
pleased with his accomplishments," 
said Mark Gorski," Olympic gold 
medalist and USCF team director. "He 
is only 19 years old and is the silver 
medalist. He has made tremendous 
progress, and we have high expecta- 
tions if he continues to work hard." 

Clay specializes in match sprint^ a 
three-lap, 1,000-meter Olympic-style 
race which matches two or three riders 
against each other. Only special bikes 
with fixed gears and no brakes are used 
on the steeply banked velodrome. The 
winner is the first to cross the finish 
line with only me final 200 meters 
timed. 

Riders arc seeded based on time tri- 
als. Each cyclist is given a lap to gain 
momentum, then timed for the final 
200 meters. Clay's 200-meter qualifi- 
cation time of 10.818 (41.6 average 
mph) was a personal best at the Major 
Taylor Velodrome and seeded him sec- 
ond after Marty Nothstein of Trexler- 
town, Pa. 

Clay won all of his matches, ad- 
vancing to me semifinal round by de- 
feating Jason Garner of Northbrook 
and James Carney of Flagstaff, Ariz. 



Clay was then matched with Los Al- 
tos, Calif, rider Jeff Solt, the No. 3 
seed, for the semifinal round. Solt had 
the lead going into the final turn when 
Clay passed underneath. In a contro- 
versial move, Solt moved down, forc- 
ing Clay down off the banking and 
narrowly avoiding a crash. Clay 
passed Solt, however, and crossed the 
line first. In the second ride, Clay 
turned on the afterburners to defeat 
Solt and advance to the gold medal 
round. 

Nothstein, 23, and Clay have been 
friends and training mates for some 
time, traveling to various parts of the 
world together as part of the U.S. Na- 
tional Cycling Team. It was fitting 
that these two top-ranked amateur 
sprinters face each other in the final 
match for the gold. 

The first sprint was very close 
with Clay passing on the outside on 
the fourth turn but not in time as 
Nothstein took both matches for the 
gold medal. 

Clay will return to Marian 
College in Indianapolis as a 
sophomore in August. Marian 
supports cycling, recognizing it as a 
varsity sport and by offering scholar- 
ships for talented riders. The school is 
located adjacent to the Major Taylor 
Velodrome and provides world-class 
coaching with Roger Young, USCF 
National Track director, serving as 
special cycling program advisor. 



Even Mother Nature bows 
to Bird's 10-strikeout show 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Even Mother Nature could not stop Joe 
Hird. 

As threatening weather sirens blared in 
the background, Gumee American Legion 
pitcher Hird induced Alex Ortigosa and 
Scott Muelleroann to fly out to Bob Ol- 
son m left field. This capped a 6-0 shutout 
in which Hird fanned 10 Round Lake bat- 
ters Saturday at Faulkner Field in Gumee. 

The win was the second of- the District 
10 campaign for Hird, who will likely at- 
tend the College of Lake County this fall. 
He downed Bairington earlier in the week. 

"My curveball was not working today, so 
I just wanted to throw gas by all of them. 
I was feeling tight early on, so I just stuck 
with my fastball," Hird said. 

He had high praise for catcher Ryan Tay- 
lor. '"' 

"Ryan does a great job back there. He 
helps me out a lot. He knows what is best 
for me," Hhd said. 

Hird helped his team win its fourth 
straight by getting out of a bases-loaded, 
no-oul predicament in the Round Lake 
fifth. Steve Taylor singled, Justin Koski 
walked and Pat Lejman singled. 

"I just really concentrated when the bases 
got loaded," Hird said. 

That worked as Scott Schupp popped 
out, Origosa became the seventh strikeout 
victim and Muellemann popped ouL 

Gumee had just gained a 6-0 lead with 
five runs in the fourth. Ryan Taylor sin- 
gled and scored on a double by Brian 
Karolewicz. Sean Eifert singled and walks 
to the next two hitters upped the lead to 3- 
0. Sacrifice flys by Curt Salata and Olson 



brought home two more runs before an 

RBI single by Erick Blaha completed the 

inning. 

, "We had some of our younger players in 

the lineup today and they contributed," 

Gumee coach Rick Hill said. 

Gumee (6-2) downed Mundelein 10-2 and 
Barrington 6-1. Olson was 4 for 4 with 
three runs scored against Mundelein. 

Blaha continued his hot hitting, with an- 
other three-hit attack against Round Lake. 

"We played OK, we just had one bad in- 
ning," Round Lake manager Ron Sapoc- 
hak said. 

Sapochak was just in bis second game as 
coach of Round Lake. Glenn Jewel was 
coaching both the Colts and Legion 
teams, but opted to stay with the Colts 
when Sapochak volunteered to coach. 

Round Lake clobbered Lake Zurich 17-0 
behind winning pitcher Schupp. 




Joe Hird 



Friday, July 2. 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 5 1 






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Hewlcu Paclurd 
N. III. Mechanical 
Rebels 

Oorriion's Sep(ic ' 
4-Coynci 
Euro-Tan 
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Chiefj 
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Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 



^ito^Softball City 



Midnight Blue 1 1 1 

Rodger lUbtiil ' 10 2 

Wicka 'N' Slickj S 4 

MSH Auiomoitve 6 6 

Quill Corpi. 5 7 

Carter Hofr.;Jokeri Wild S. 9 

Raidcn/Damase Inc. ,48 

Unity 4 ■ a 



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Montlay Night 
Men*! Compcllllve I 




Emil'iyRosendaht 

Downing Tovwn 

Coitello'f 

ProruflonSytlenu 

Yfidil-Scas^>uitawi 

Tribe 

Jack Frofl Iron Woriu 

TonyanTroeldng 

Milwaukee Road House 

Mtn'i D 

In- Law* 
Strange Brew 
Y-Ncx/MixowsU 
Y-No(/Knighton 
Kook'i Lumber " 
Hello Folka 
Rockie* 

OMAC Mortgage 
Whitney Street 

Mcd'i D 



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Teresa Kern of Just Oak Furniture eyes a fat pitch 
during a Friday Coed League game at Softball City. — 
Photo by Bill Carey 





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Neilion'i Enterprljei 


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Owry Electric 


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Sterling Fitiish 


3 


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Hometown VkJeo 


2 


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Ring'i Radialor 


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4 


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Yvonne'f Other Race 


3 


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Uhlmalf Dijtributing 


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Softball City Sand Volleyball 



Tuesiiay Coed 
6'f B 

Net Mova 
Rtfiux Center 
Nortxit Plating 
U-Looz 

The Enemy - 
.Rupbeiriea 
SaixlIaOurShwU 

6*1 Reel 

Antiwh Spotti Ceaicr 
Kelly'a Pub 
Fred'i Diner ' 
Saitd Blaiicn 
Royal Fabricatioa 
Musiangi 
New Team , 
Bingham 

6'a Rec-2 

SandSioriTKn 
Vanderwall ^ 
Brid'a Priming 
Nu-Way 
All 4 Fun/Annex 
3nl Degree 
McOean-Fogg 
Tom'i Aulo 
AJ'i Pub 



Qnadi 



BareFeetj 
Buoviky 
Beach Bump] 
Mkkcy Finni 
BulTalo Bar 
Jablonski 



Wednesday 

Abbott Coed 6'i 

A LcBgue 



Sand Turtles 
Paccsciicfs 
Sand Blasters 
Ball Movements 



B Ltcgue 



Blind Datet 
SandFleaa 



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Windjammer* 
Orccn Machine 
Sand Hogi 
tAisTris 
Net Fun 
IheDiflkj 



Wednesday 
Recreiillonal 6*1 



CYN 

CocoLocos 

Dowa&Diny 

Orion 3 . 

Chicago Title 

Maneo't Fendng 

NIawka 

Animal Emergency 

Btir Flies 

BeeBope 



Mcn'a 2'a 



Mofafle 
DuDvsky 
Vondermeer 
The While Boyi 
Ouulina 
-Koslrova 
DareFeeli 



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Thursday Coed 



A LcagDc 



TheUmokk 

Hook't Lumber 

Lakes Bowl 

UhHuh 

Killer B'a 

Apuhy 

Butt Headi 

Old Bui Still Ative 

SaodFleaj 



B League 



Tum& Bum 

JuitUi 

Spike Force 

Lut Chance 

O'Brien 

European Motor 

Sind Sharks 

Frank & Martha's Tile 



W 
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Recreational 

The Droppings 

Home Comfort Heating 

Indian Kill Beach Bunts 

Just Funnin' 

Really Big Fed 

Chuggen 

llwBums 

Friday 
Abboll Coed 6't 
A League . 

Sun Blockers 
Toilc Avengers 
Derra's Diggers 
Suid Bustcri 

B League 

Point Bitak 

The Alleniilcs 

SpikcThlil 

Sand BUiteit 

Disc iplej of Nietzsche 

Snnd Slcrmers 

Violatcn 

BustcdProbei 

Friday Coed 
A LcBgtie 

Bennett Chiropmcllc Group 

Brlgson 

What's the Matter Here? 

Zoiks/Butke 

Octagon Hair 



B League 

Sand Ellen 

Bump, Set. Chug 

Kelly's Pub 

Fun Bunch , 

Larson Excavating 

Dam, Sneil A Tavlern 

Strang Funeral Home 

Recreillona] 

RCCWa 
Uga-Bugas 
OhS-l 
Pin Lltards 

Flannigan's 

Obon Tramportaiion 

Hack Monsters 



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Calvary Temple . 

Living Waters 

Shepherd of ihc Lake 

Fos L^kc Baptist 

Ukeland Evangelical , 

Bethel LuiJieran 

Si, Andrews 

Holy Cross Lutheran 

Tuesday Night 
Men's Industrial 

Crliara &. Son 
Dueblin Co. 
Midwest Brick Paving 
Sonsoflliunder 
Cubs/Bake's Pub 
, Piper Plastics 
Y-Nol Sandbar 
Jardis Industries 
Baxter Kelltiisen 

Mm's CompttlUve 

Kn'itors 

Quiet Sicrm 

DaBoyz 

Midnight Bhie 

Moore Gteaiive 

Slugs 

Segerdahl Printing 

Remu 

IBEW Local 150 

Men's D 

O&R Really 

Baible Dowels 

Sur^ipath 

Tigen/Lakes Bowl 

Sportsrnan's of Ubettyvllle 

SofUuIIFiffy 

Randdl's 

Ron A Brian's Suzuki 

Roadkit) 

Mcn'a D 

Oatrt-Med t^fcaglng 
Hastings S.B. Gub 
Bulldogs 
CrisaraASon 
Pcfco/Centuty2l 
Rockies 

Downing Tavern 
Grant Heat Sink 
Spartans 
Mimi's Lingerie 

Men's D 

W 

Pro-Tool a 

Krisiofs«ulofO)ntrol 4 

Oiill Whippets 5 

■ Dynamite DJ/Knuckleheads 3 

C/CPub 3 

Bamum's All-Amer. Kotdogs 3 

CPI 4 

Lite Sticks/Floor to Ceiling 1 

Village Spirit Pub 1 

Jardls Industries 1 

Wednesday Night 

Woacn's CompctlllTe 



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Frtcisiofl 

Mundelein Animal HotpUal 
R-J-B/S-B-G 
Shanty 

Watklngion Collies 
Meline Oilto/Iwcma St. Farm 
Dizzy's 
-Kristofs 
Maki Constitidian 



W 

8 
8 
7 
6 
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4 
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Scoll'i Headquuters Saioii . 
Men's D 

SlelU's Resort 
New Blood 
Ollmer Road House 

Intrupa 
Bill's Pizza 
Baits Out - 
Shogfen Fence - 

Ulti male Distributing 
Strsnge Brew 



L 

2 
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Men's D 



Kmart Nlles 
I6-lnct)ets 
Silver Oout 
BJS Builden 
KHM Plastics 
Diehards 
AAMOO 
McKay IVtuda 
One-Hitlers 



Men's D 



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Peterson Plumbing 
Rinnelb Softball 
KHM Plastics . 
Coffeemaslers 
Naked Guns 
Jones lolereable 
Fosum Deconting 
Slsjiulus Concrete 
Merit Initilliiiotis 
. Coolcmpo Deiigtt 

Meo'iC Major 

W 
Y-Not Sandbar 9 

• KenCookTruckJog 6 

Worms " 3 

Dowrdflg Tavern 3 

Ball Broihcn 3 

Outlaws 3 

Diiz/J 3 

Dunamis 2 

Russell's Sports Cub 2 

Thursday Night 
Men's IndDstria) 

W 
The Fhikcs 3 

CF Industnes 3 

Y-Not Sandbar 3 

Hello Folks Ma Rufoduring 3 

Men With Wood 4 

Dueblin Co. 4 

Quill BandiU 2 

Wolohan Lumber 2 

Midwest Motor Coach 

Men's CompcUllte D 



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Pegasus Mcjiengcr Service 
Ernie's Wrecking 
Robinson's 
Lake c:auniy Elites 
Legends 

Segerdahl Printing 
Margol'l Rebels 
Hendrixton lostaliation 
Gone Flstiin' 

Men's D 

Y-No(Grubich 
Tiger/Lakes Bowl 
X-t}ogs 

MAMEsavailng 
Mickey Finn's 
Dizzy's 
Downing Tavern 



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bogla-BoogIa 

Slowboys 

— Men's D 

JTi Rosdhouse 

Midwest Hose 

Fall Guys 

Computers Alive 

Slammen 

H ighl a nd Green Nursery 

McLean Fogg 

Dicliards 

Colonial Tire . 

Midnight Blue 

Men's D 

No Bull 

Men With Wood 

Modern Homes 

Nix's 

USFP . 

Midwest Motor Coach 

Kammerheads/iniberg 

Stooges 

Y'Not Sandbor/Glenewicz 

Walgreen's 

Friday Night 
Coed 

VRAN 

Waste TetJiPyihoM 

JustOsk 

Lindenhurtt Sluggers 

B&H Moid 

OMC Dream Team 

QuiU Corporation 

Hubbell Electrical Products - 

Bass Brawlers 

Cumee Mills . ^ 

Coed 'Major 

Simmons Engineering 

The Coeds 

UMmaie 

Custom Autt/Keith's Topsail 

HnVs 24-Hour Towing 

Loogshols 

TCSquirrells 

ATie 

Citsic Chevrolet 

Men'* C 

N.m. Mechanical ■ 
Rock-NRoll 
NobenPisiJng 
Amioch Doiige 
Swirling Eddiu 
Cbors Light 
Edwardo's 
Barbarians 
Hello Folks 

Men'i D 

Dtkolas 

Untouchables 

Landscape Concepts 

B -C Conade/Siqi. Sealcoat 

QuictStomi 

Great Lakes Metal Fab. - 

Baiter 

BUckjadcs 

Crystal Transport 

Mrn'i D 

Lake County Medical Ou 

Alpha CoMXpU 

Bin^mSluggcn 

Blasters 

Nobert II 

Bsd Boys 

O-K Coctracloa 

Backstabbets 

Federated 

Longshois 



Wilmot Speedway 



2 


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Wllmot Speedway/Star Trac 
Point Standings ' 
(Through June 26) 
Sprints 
1. Mike Frost, Zion, 335; 2. Dick 
Colburn, Muskego. Wis,, 258; J. 
Dennis Spitz, Kenosha, 253; 4. Dave 
Moulis, Johnsburg, 24S; 5. Kim Mock, 
Kenosha, 237; S. Dave Bliss, Harvard, 
237; 7. Joe Roc, Kenosha, 222; 8. Gary 
Zobcl, Salem. Wis., 212; 9. John Tier- 
ney. Lake Villa. 186; 10. Danell 
Dodd, Beach Park. 177. 

MUlcr Genuine Draft Dash 
t. Mike Frost, 28; 2. Dave Moulis, 
24; 3. Kim Mock, 17; 4. John Tiemey, 
16; 5. Dennis Spilz, 14; 6. Gary Zobel, 
13; 7. Dick Colburn, 1 1; 8. Dave Bliss; 
9; 9. Joe Roe, 8; 10. Todd Daun, 
Kenosha,?; 10. Dale Peterson, Drook- 
ficld, Wis., 7; 10. At Schmidt, Racine, 
7. 



Modincdf 
1. Lenny Ostrowski, Jr., North 
Cape, Wis.. 304; 2. Leioy Oslrowski, 
Milwaukee, 264; 3. Jtmmy Uuech. Jr., 
Kenosha, 245; 4. Dennis Spitz, 
Kenosha, 237; 5. Gary Dye, Genesee, 
Wis., 230; 6. Chris Mooney. Milwau- 
kee, 219; 7. Tim Ammon, Kenosha- 
Milwaukee, 215; 10. Troy HepFner, 
Sussex, Wis., 211. 

Sportsman 
I. Ed Devall, Waukcgan, 286; 2, 
Larry Surlcta. Round Lake, 282; 3. 
Scolt Kuxhouse, Round Lake, 264; 4. 
John Pochler. Libeityville, 260; 5. Jim 
Surleu, Round Lake, 256; 6. Dave 
Holden, Zion, 230; 7. Bobby John 
Hensley, Round Lake, 221; 8. Jay 
Crich ion. Lake Villa, 220; 9. Jukka 
Myllymaki, Beach Park, 213; 10. Jim 
Bennett, Round Lake, 180, 

Old Style Mini-Sprints 



1. Scott Sippel, Elkhart Lake, 
Wis.. 233; 2. Romy Baus, Rubicon, 
Wis., 231; 3. Joe Follow, Cascade, 
Wis., 222; 4. Glenn Isaacson, Wild- 
wood. 196; 5. Craig Schueffner, She- 
boygan, Wis.; 6. Dennis Frea, Sluigcon 
Bay, Wis., 172; 7. Dave Deicher, Ply- 
mouth, Wis., 170; 8. Kai McNulty, 
Racine. 164; 9. Todd Lehr, Antloch, 
161: 10. Sieve Moulis. Fox Lake, 157. 

Mlni-Modineds 
1. Dr. Ken Jolinson, Paddock 
Lake, Wis., 182; 2. Tommy Sexton, 
Antioch, 180; 3, Olen ycmczze. Salem. 
Wis., 162; 4. Roy Morrison, Amioch, 
160; 5. Jerry Hey wood, Richmond, 
150; 6. Tom Sexton, Crystal Lake, 130; 
7. Tim Anderson, Salem, Wis,, 128; 8. 
Lorri Bochal, Salem, Wis., 122; 9. Jim 
Morrison, Antioch, 112; 10. Craig 
Rosemann, Antiocb. 96. 



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Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 





Hero worship 

Bears quarterback Jim Harbaugh tries to eat and get a word in edge-wise witli 
14-year-old Kenny Stolman at Brae Loc Country Club. Stolman is tlie son of 
David Stolman, a member of the Lake County Board and the Lake County 
Forest Preserve. — Photo by Gene Gabry 



Indians look to bounce back 



Gumee Kaiser Indians 
manager Chris Stranowicz 
saw some solid effort but 
the execution was not there 
for the Indians, who. started 
the week in the Shoreline 
League hunt. 

The Indians dropped three 
straight, losing to Lake 
Forest 8-2 at home and then 
10-7 and 6-5 to Arlington 

Hts: 

"We are not playing well, 
but the attitude is still 
pretty good," Chris Stra- 
nowicz said. 

He suffered the mound 
loss in the 6-5 decision to 
the new Arlington Hts. 
squad. His brother Bill hit a 
two-run homer for a 5-3 
lead before Arlington Hts. 
scored three runs in the sev- 
enth inning. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: All 
Around The House 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED 
IN THIS COUNTY; 36388 N. 
Tamarack, Inglaside, IL 
60041. 

NAME(S) AND POST OF- 
FICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
DRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SON(S) OWNING. CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Thomas P. 
O'Laughlin, 36388 N. 
Tamarack, Ingleside, IL 
60041. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(&) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(&) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Thomas P. O'Laughlin 
June 8, 1993 

The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before' me by the per- 
8on{s) Intending to con- 
duct the business this 
June 8, 1993. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Harold L Freedberg 

Notary Public 

Received: June 22, 1 993 

Linda lanuzl Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0793A-816-FL 

Julys, 1993 

July 9, 1993 

July 16, 1993 



Randy Splitt, who singled 
ahead of Bill Stranowicz's 
homer, was 2 for 3; Joe 
Keller and Glenn Chesser 
had two hits each. 

Darin Douval suffered the 
loss in the 10-7 decision to 
Arlington Heights. Arling- 
ton. Heights scored five runs 
in the second inning for an 
8-3 lead. ' 

Splitt was 2 for 2 with a 



pair of runs scored and John 
Bartels was2for3. 

Dave Farrow suffered the 
loss against Lake Forest. 
The thu-d and the fifth in- 
nings were particularly 
troublesome for the Indians, 
as Lake Forest scored four 
runs in each innings. 

Gumee battled Waukegan 
before taking the July 4 
weekend off. 




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Antioch's Crystal Cox was a mem- 
ber of the MacMurray College softball 
squad that finished second m the St. Louis 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. The 
Lady Highlander were 16-22 overall and 
8-7 in the SLIAC. A freshman' this ' 
spring, Cox is the daughter of John and 
Chris Cox. 

Join the many alunmi. parents and 
friends of Carmel for the school's Invi- 
tational Golf Scramble at the Mari- 
ott Lincolnshire Friday, July 23. The to- 



tal package — golf, refreshments and 
awards dinner — is $85. Call 566-3000, 
exL 342 to register. The deadline is July 
7. 

Oakwood Racquet and Health Club in 
Waukegan. will present its Firecracker 
tournaments July 10. The tourneys in- 
clude a three-point basketball shoot- 
out, a double-elimination coed 6's volley- - 
ball tourney and a mixed-doubles tennis 
tourney. For more details, call Kathy at 
336-7444 or visit the club at 351 Oak- 
wood Ave. 




Rivera honored 



Colin McRae, president of Lake County Forest Preserve, and former Bear 
Ron Rivera discuss the advantages surrounding the Youth Consen/atioh 
Corp. Rivera who was recognized for his efforts In supporting the YCC golf 
outing. 



Il*s that lime of year to gearup fora giant, spectacular 




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Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 




Keep those elbows at shoulder height — 
hold the position for two' seconds, Sam 
Riggelman told baseball campers at War- 
ren High Schoolthis week. 

Some 200 youngsters converged in 
Gurnee to learn the basics from Riggel- 




man» head baseball coach at Southern Illi- 
nois University. 

Riggelman and assistant Ken Hender- 
son, along with two other college 
coaches, worked the basics from pitching 
to catching and fielding ground balls and 
flyballs and hitting to the campers during 
the week-long session. 

"We have a lot of players who come 
back year in and year out," said Ron Shel- 
ton, camp director. 

Brian Baker, baseball coach at Olivet- 
Nazerine College, and Bill Bair from Indi- 
ana Wesleyan are college coaches giving 
pointers. 

The SIU camp is in its fourth year at 



Warren. "We started it four years ago 
when Sam was an assistant at SIU and we 
got a fair response. It has been growing 
every year," Shelton said. 

Shelton, longtime head coach at Warren 
before retiring this season, reported some 
50 campers in the 7 to 10-year-old range. 
The camp is sponsored by Grand Sporting 
Goods in Gumee. 

"It is alot of fun getting to spend time 
with various coaches," Henderson said. 

Henderson said the pitching places the 
emphasis on mechanics, not when one 
should pick up individual pitches. 

"In hitting, we don't get specific, but 
give them fundamentals," Henderson said. 

As for the Carbondale program, the 
Salukis are trying to get back to the 1990 
level which earned them the Missouri 
Valley Conference title. 

The team hit the skids the last couple of 
weeks, finishing 22-29 and fourth in the 
league. 

Warren grads Dave Farrow and Craig 
Shelton are doing well, Riggelman said, 

Shelton played shortstop the last several 
games, conunitting just one error in 25 
chances. 



"He will have every opportunity to start 
next year," Riggelman said. 

Shelton hit in the .400 neighborhood. 

Farrow and Libertyvilie grad Zach 
Adams were freshmen who saw pitching 
time as front-liners went down to injury. 

"Dave has worked on his straight change 
and his breaking ball has gotten a lot bet- 



ter. Zach has been working on his straight 
change,'' Riggelman said. 

Derek Shelton update: the only 
Warren grad to make it to the minors is 
playing backup catcher for the Yankees* 
Class A. team in Greensboro, N.C. The 
team won the first half title of the South 
Atlantic League with a 45-25 record. 



Vikings schedule tryouts 



It's time to dig out those shoulder pads, 
hit that blocking sled and lime that 40- 
yard dash. 

That is if football players wish to 
become members of the" Lake County 
Vikings. The semi-pro team will hold a 
practice at 6:30 p.m. July 6 at Round 
Lake High. 

"All positions arc still open," co-owner 
Rick Starosta said. 

The Vikings are under the direction of 



first-year head coach Julian Tucker.- 
Tucker played nine years in, the NFL in 
Dallas and Denver. 

Exhbition games begin July 24 with an 
away game at Chicago Bulldogs. The 
Chicago Chargers come to Liberty ville's 
Butler Lake Park Aug. 1. Chicago 
Thunder closes out the exhibition game 
Aug. 7 at 6 p.m..at Round Lake High. 

The Vikings, in their fifth year, were 6- 
7 overall last year. 




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Ron Shelton gives Brad Dunla^of Lindenhurst a pitching pointer during the 
Salul<i Baseball Camp at Warren. SIU head coach Sam Riggelman and the War- 
ren staff are directing some 200 campers. 




MARKET PLACE LTD. 



MUNDELEIN, IL 



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ROUND LAKE 

Se Habia EspanoL 

Ask For 

Ray Lopez 

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Give tlie reader all 
the specifics. 



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reading the classifieds. 
What would you like to 
know about the item, ser- 
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details such as: 

• color • size • condition 

• brand name • age 

• features • and benefits 

Be accurate! Don't embell- 
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information. Stick to the 
facts. 



Include the price. 



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offer, the people who 
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those who are genuinely 
interested. Surveys show 
that readers are more inter- 
ested in those items and 
services they know are 
within their price raiige. 



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number & hours, ■consecutive \veeks. 



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hours you indicate you 
will be available. Don't 
risk missing a sale! 



Your ad will not get 
results if people don't 
see it! Therefore, it is 
important to set up a 
consistent and consecu- 
tive ad schedule with 
your sales representa- 
tive. Run your ad for at 
least two weeks. 



The Lakeland Newspapers fiiendly classified advertising representatives are happy 
to assist you with your ad over the phone. They even assist you with writing your 
ad. Just call (708) 223-8161 to place your classified ad. Representatives will help 
you with your ad by phone Monday thru Thursday, 8 am to 8 pm and Saturdays 
8:30 am to 12 pm. You can also place your ad in person at: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St 

Grayslake, IL 




Deadline For Ads: 

Wednesday 10 am before publication 




W<}KCfCard 




Phone (708) 223-8161 
Fax (708) 223-8810 



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54 Lakeland Newspafsers 



Friday, July 2. 1993 



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, Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 




The Health Systems Tae Kwon Do Club in Antioch 
has sent 1 1 of its members to the U.S. Junior 



Olympic Championships In Dayton, Ohio this week- 
end. — Photo by Greg Miller 



Antioch Little League 



AAA 

W L 

Dairy Queen 10 

Antioch Tire 6 3 

Hansen Custom Cabinets 6. 4 

First Chicago 5 5 

Burger King 4 6 

PIP Printing 3 7 

BJ's Sports . 3 7 

Raymond Chevrolet 2 7 

June 22-26 
Hansen Cabinet} 8, Burger King 7 
Dairy Quetn 21, Raymond Clievy S 
First Cliicago 16. Bfs Sports 10 
BJ's Sports 10, Raymond Chevy 4 
Antiocii Tire S.lHansen Cabtnets 
PIP Printing i3. Burger King 6 
Burger King 1 1, First Chicago 5 

Dairy Queen 4, 
First Chicago 3 

Defensive: Dan Church, Dan Ma- 

har, Jim Spencc. 

Offensive: Robbie McWhcrtcr, 

Andy Pries, 

Offensive; Brett CuHcn, home 

run; Luke Larson, two-run double 

to win the game. 

Hansen Cabinet 17, 
PIP Printing 5 
Defensive: Kevin Podstawa, Ja- 
son Kraeszig, Pat Minter. 
Offensive: Matt Amundsen, Ken 
Krull, Lucas Johnson. 
Highlight: PIP'S Ken Krull tagged 
Mike Lynn at home, for third out. 
Antioch Tire 17, 
PIP Printing 7 
Defensive: Matt Amundsen, 
Charley Miller, Kris Camphouse. 



Offensive: AJ. Baslcr, Jason 
Kraeszig, Kevin Podstawa. 
Defensive; Brandon O'Donnol, 
Chad Hanncnbcrg. 
Offensive: Matt Nelson, Derrick 
Witt and O'Donnol had two hits 
each: "- . 



Majors 



w L 



Baskin-Robbins 
SCate Bank 
Senior Center 
Hxlad 
Lyons-Ryan 
Bemhardt's 
First National 
The Vault 



9 
7 
7 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 



1 
1 

2 
6 
6 
6 
7 
8 



T 

I 
2 
1 
1 





1 



state Bank 15, 
Lyons-Ryan 3 

Defensive: Brad Amundsen. 

Offensive: Jeff Gicmoih, Ken Ci- 

chon. 

Defensive; Brandon Franckc. 

Highlight: Cichon pitched com- 
plete ganie. 

State Bank 13, 
First National 1 

Defensive: Corey Fauscr. 

Defensive: Bryant Popp. 

Offensive: Luke Haley, Brad 

Amundson. 

Highlight: Gavin Burke pitched 

complete game.. 



Seniors 



Fox Lake (No. 7) 



W 

7 



T 





Ben Franklin 7. 3 1 

Fox Lake (No, 5) 5 3 

Advertiser 5 6 

Antioch Blues 4 7 

Fox Lake (No. 6) 4 7 

Antioch Reds 3 7 1 

Advertiser 21, 
. Ben Franklin 14 

Defensive: Chris DeBoard, Jeff 
Neubiser. --^ 

Offensive: Chris DcBoard, dou- 
ble; Adam Sass, double; Dennis 
Heimbrodt, double. - 
Offensive: Russ Todd, 3 for 3, 
four RBIs; Jesse Hall, 2 for 2. 
Highlights: Scott Neubiser, two- 
run homer, Eric Francke hit 
bases-toadcd triple and Eric Stcf- 
fcnberg pitched complete game 
for win. 

Fox Lake (No. 7) 11, 
Advertiser 4 

Defensive: Dennis Heimbrodtn 

(first base), Michael DeBocr 

(shortstop), Jeff . Neubiser 

(catcher). 

Offensive: Scott Neubiser, Jesse 

UKsch. 

Defensive: Pitcher Jason Mason. 

Offensive: Alfie Vasquez. 

Highlight: Advertiser's- Jesse 

Ultsch allowed just one hit in 

four innings pitched. 

Antioch Reds 18, 

Fox Lake (No. 6) 

Defensive: Gordy Pcrsha and 



Joseph Perminas. Persha pitched 
one-hit .shutout. On only hit, 
center fielder Scott De Young 
threw out runner trying to take 
second. 



Lake Villa 
Little League 



Bronco 





W 


L 


White Sox 


17 


1 


Rockies 


14 


4 


Marlins 


13 


5 


Cubs 


11 


6 


AUiIetica 


U 


7 


Blue Jays 


10 


8 


Orioles 


6 


11 


Angels 


5 


11 


Cardinals 


3 


14 


Braves 


3 


14 


Brewers 


2 


16 


June 21-26 






Rockies 6, Blue Jays 1 






Marlins 12, Angels 5 






Cubs 16, Orioles 4 






Rockies 6, Cardinals 2 






Athletics 15, Cardinals 5 






WhrlcSoxll,CubilO 






Athletics 11, Braves 9 






Cardinals 15, Brewers 14 






Athletics 1 0,'Angels 2 






While Sox 13, Braves 5 






Cubs 28, Brewers 14 






Rockies 11, Marlins 5 






Braves 19. Brewers 13 






Cubs 12, Cardinals 9 






Orioles 14, Cardinals 10 






Marlins 10. White Sox 9 






Rockies 12, Brewers 7 







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KarsUaJdd^ IJ.S. meet 

Eleven members of the Health Systems Tae Kwon Do 
Club in Antioch are competing this weekend in the 13th 
U.S. Junior Olympic Championships at Wright State Uni- 
versity in Dayton, Ohio; 

Thegroup earned the trip to the nationals by placing in 
the top three in regional competition. One member of the 
contingent is 12-year-old Timothy Walker, who placed sec- 
ond in the national meet in Oriando, Fla. last year. 

At the national meet are Walker, Matt Elliott, Michelle 
Elliott, Greg Hilgenberg, Joe Phelps, Nicholas Galich, 
Garrett Schultz, Jarrett Edwards, Dan Kautak, John Seiber 
II and Hector Gonzalez, The event will be on ESPN. 

Members of the Health Systems Tae Kwon Do Club are 
instructed by Grand Master Koang Woong Kim, Robert 
Ludwig' and John Seiber. 

Zitkus paces golf league 

The leaders in the Tuesday Women's Golf League al 
Spring Valley Country Club are Nancy Zitktis (A Flight), 
Irene Teresi (B Flight), Fran Priory (C Flight) and Doris 
Mittelheuser ((D Flight). 

The league has slated an outing at Rivermoor Country 
Club in Waterford, Wis. for July 22. The $35 fee wiU in- 
clude 18 holes, a cart, lunch and prizes^ The first tee time 
will be 10:30 a.m. 

The league — sponsored by the State Bank of Antioch 
— welcomes substitute players for its weekly early morn- 
ing" play. Call Alvera Morgan, league president, at 395- 
3598. 




Leaders in the Tuesday. Women's Golf Leajgue at 
Spring Valley include, from left to right, Doris Mittel- 
heuser, Fran. Priory and Nancy Zitkus. Not pictured is 
Irene Teresi. 



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Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 



«»■•*■ 






■}'•• 




Antioch stru s sles, learns 

Waueoiida in festive mood 
thanks to blast from Opsal 






I ■ ■ 

I 



Jeff Giernoth is safe at second as T J. Dawson takes the throw in Antioch Little 
League play. — Photo by Bill Carey 

Cards set 
sign-ups 

The Lakeland Cardinals, 
will conduct registration for 
the 1993 season Saturday 
and Sunday, July 10-11 at 
the Grant High School 
football concession stand. 
Both sessions wUl run from 
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. 

The Cardinals, members 
of the Northern Illinois Ju- 
nior Football League, wel- 
come boys from Fox Lake, 
Ingleside, Lake Villa and 
Spring Grove who will en- 
ter the fifth through eighth 
grades this fall. 

The Cardinals offer ju- 
nior and senior traveling 
teams as well as in-house 
teams. The first practice Is 
slated for Aug. 15, while 
the first game will be in 
early September. The fee is 
$50 per player. 

Rich Becmer is the pres- 
ident of the organization. 

Call head coach Dan Ca- 
role at 587-9261 for more 
information. 




Jeff Rohrer gets dusted by a pitch during a Lake Villa 
Township Little League game. — Photo by Mary 
Phillips 













> ■ < 

r ■ 



WE COVER YOUR TOWIV 

At Lakeland Newspapers, we take the time to get the whole 
local news story. We print accurate and entertaining local 
news. Now is the time to take advantage of home delivery. 
Receive 52 weekly issues for only $16.50 

Here's what you can expect every week: 

•Pron^HomeDdivEiy •LocalNcws •Monthly^pedalFealures 

•CompteteClasBifieds •Enlatainment -SdioolNews 

•LocalSporis •Thxlnfionnation •ProfesaonalAdvettismg 

For more inf ormaHon, call (708) 223-8161 




NAM^ 



Yes, I'd like to lake advantage of a one year subscription 
to the papen I will receive 52 issues for only $16.50 

Q UndeflhurM N«wt 



ADDRESS. 



CITY/ZIP. 



PH0N5_ 



VISArt^C*. 



EXP.DAT^ 



. I. 

.1 






SIGNATURE. 



' Q MuntMoln N«wi ■ 

Q NofihCtilcaoo Tribunal 
'Q Round Lake Nmn I 
.D VainonHilltNmn ' 
' Q Wanwi-Ncwpod PrHi| 
.Q Wuiconda LsAdttr a 
Q Antioch Naw«-Rtpo(tarl 
• Q Fox Uka Preu I 

"^ GrayslaheTlfiwi ' 



i Mail with your check to: Circulation Dept 

I Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 Q tokt zurid 

I Local Dalivary Only. ' Q Uborryviiie 



Q Gurnee Preu 

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Q Uka Zurich EntarprlM I 

Nowi I 



There was a definite mood of festiveness 
in Wauconda this Friday night. 

Just across the street, residents and visi- 
tors were celebrating summer at Wau- 
condafest 

At Wauconda High School, the Legion 
baseball team was also celebrating the 
season with a 7-2 win over Antioch. 

Jason bpsal provided the key hit, a 
three-run homer in the second inning for a 
7-0 Wauconda lead; Antioch reliever Dave 
Jones held Wauconda scoreless after Uiat 

"The first time I faced him, he threw me 
a fastball down the middle," Opsal said of 
Antioch starter Matt Formica. 

Opsal, like the Wauconda team in gen- 
eral, has been coming along of late hit- 
ting-wise. "I feel confident eyery time 1 . 
go to the plate because of the help I had 
in the high school season," he said. 

"Opsal has been doing a good job. Hit- 
ting started out slowly this season, but 
we have come around of late," Wauconda 
manager Byron Johnson Sr. said. 

Wauconda was indeed the aggressive 
team at the plate in the first two innings 
against Antioch. Foiir runs scored in the 
first as Kevin Gajda and Jason Moreley 
walked, Opsal sacrificed and Jim Schmuck 
had an RBI single. Paul Krucek then fol- 
lowed with the same. 

Reaching base in front of Opsal's boom- 
ing homer to left field were Cajda with 



his second walk and Daye Musser, who 
singled. 

Wauconda improved to: 2-3 with the win, • 
coniing after a 17-5 pasting of Barrington. 

Antioch scored its runs in the fifth and 
seventh innings. Antioch had baserunners 
in five of the seven frames. Jones' show- 
ing was an encouraging sign for the first- 
year club. . . „,, 

"He was a stopper, for the high school 
team^He ha§ to contrpl his emotions," 
Antioch manager Paul Petty said. 

Antioch (1-7) has found a rough go of if 
in its fu:st District 10 season, but Petty is 
glad the team can get some experience. 

"At least they are playing baseball. Oth- 
erwise, they would be working at Jewel 
and waiting nine months to play again," 
Petty said. , ' ■ 

Matt Demartini, who singled in the sev- 
enth inning, and Casey O'Coiinell have 
been hitting well. of late, Petty said. 
"Casey is a tremendous shortstop," Petty 
offered. . 

Antioch has put a scare into some league 
contenders. Antioch trailed just 3-2 into 
the fifth inning against Waukegan before 
losing 6-2. They lost to Mundelein by the 
same score. 

Antioch hosts Mundelein Friday, July 2 
at 6 "p.m., while Wauconda hosts Round 
Lake. 




The action around the plate is fast and furious during a Lake Villa Township Little 
League game pitting the Angels and the Rockies. — Photo by Mary Phillips 

Sidekicks tough in tourneys 



by MELINDA KENNEY 

Students of the Sidekicks Martial Arts 
Studio in Lindenhurst have placed in sev- 
eral national tournaments this spring and 
summer. 

Tournament participants competed in 
the areas of form, fighting and sparing. 
Peter Cole paced the club, taking four 
fu:st-place honors, two from niajor tourna- 
ments in the sparring competition. 

Sidekicks students participated in the 
Joe Gangis Kung Fu Tournament in 
Chicago in May. Sidekicks results in- . 
eluded Peter Cole, first in sparing and 
second in form; Brian EIrod, second in 
sparing; Jeremy Lawn, third in sparring; 
and Adam Cole, third in form. 

Results from the American Karate 
Association Grand Nationals in Lombard 
in May included instructor Paul Haroian, 
third in sparring; Valerie Stevens, second 
in sparring; Peter Cole, first in form and 
first in sparring; Adam Cole, second in 
sparring; Randy. Stevens, sixth in form; 



Darren Jackson, third in form and a final- 
ist in sparring; Felicia Morrow, first in 
sparring and sixth in form; Frankie Nel- 
son, third- in sparring; and Nikko Jeffer- 
son, fourth in sparring. . 

Over 2,100 competitors were at the 
Kentucky Blue Grass Nationals in 
Louisville, Ky., June 19. Sidekicks results 
included Terry Appel, second in fighting; 
Shea Castle, fourth in form and fourth in 
fighting; Colin Bechtle, sixth in form and 
a finalist in fighting; Ryan Leng, fifth in 
form; Randy Stevens, third in form; Kira 
Cole, finalist in fighting; Josh Henderson, 
finalist in fighting; Angela Dungjen, sixth 
in form; Sean Cole, seventh in form; Peter 
Cole, first in fighting and third in form; 
Adam Cole, finalist in fighting; Ray Am- 
brose, first in fighting; Valerie Stevens, 
third in fighting; and Haroian, finalist in 
fighting. 

For more information about the 
school, tournaments or martial arts, call 
356-1424. 



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at the 
als in 
results 
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in form; 
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Buy and Sell 
TheAmencan 

Dream 




Have A 
Happy & Safe V^ 
4th of July! ' — 



MIKE CULAT 

Lifetime Resident of Lake County 
ys-yegr Resident of Antioph 




[CaffFdr^^^ 





^Adi^iitage Realty 

532 Lake Street, Antioch, IL 



Call Mike Culat 

At838-MIKE! 

(6453) 



lif antiGCh episcopal 

wQuld like to say 

■ . ■ * 

Than/c you 

q^ie Participants, communUy bus 
and families who helped make 
(^ikP-cA-lhon '98 a huge success. 




WeThankyou Very Much ^or your Support! 




P 



Lakeland Newspapers 57 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



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Lakeland Newspapeii 63 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



Police Beat 

Persons chorqed wllh q crime ore Innocent until proven guilty In a court of law 



Scoiiff r j ect gets approval 



ANTIOCH 
DWLS 

Antioch Police rcponed 
on June 24 a Chicago woman 
was arrested and charged with 
driving while her license was 
suspended. 

Elizabeth M Soluri, 28, 
of 3201 S. Wells, was 
stopped for speeding after 
allegedly traveling 40 
m.p.h. in a 20 m.p.h speed 
zone. 
DWLR 

Antioch Police reported 
on June 25 a Wisconsin man 
was anested and charged with 
seven offenses after pulling 
out of his driveway. 

George Andrew Fuller, 
30, of 7707 Lily, Lake, 
Burlington, allegedly pulled 
out of his driveway at 2:30 
a.m. without his headlights 
on and turned onto Drom Ct. 
without signaling. When 
police signaled to question 
Fuller, he had already exited 
his car and began running 
through an adjacent field. 
Fuller was charged with 
driving without headlights 
when required, driving on a 
revoked license, failure to 
signal, illegal transportation 
of alcohol, no valid 
registration, operation of an 
uninsured vehicle, and 
unlawful display of license 
plate. 
DWLR 

Anlioch Police reported 
on June 28 an Antioch man 
was anested and charged with 



driving on a revoked license 
after being slopped for a 
routine traffic offense. 

Todd A. Baker, 38, of 
287 Oak Ridge Ct., was 
given a traffic warning for 
the original offense and was 
released after posting bond. 
Warrant arrest 

Antioch Police reported 
on June 26 a Round Lake 
Beach man was anested and 
charged with driving .on a 
suspended license and a 
forgery wanant issued by the 
Lake County Sheriffs Police. 

Michael D. Eastwood, 
21, of 1609 N. Cedar Lake 
Rd., was transferred to die 
Sheriffs Police after being 
booked on the DWLS charge 
in Antioch. 
Warrant arrest 

Antioch Police reported 
on June 22 an Antioch was 
arrested and charged with 
speeding and a battery 
warrant issued by the Lake 
County Sherifrs Police. 

Daniel R. Misicka, 31, of 
42175 Lotus, was stopped 
for allegedly traveling 71 
m.p.h in a 55 m.p.h. speed 
zone. ' 

LINDENHURST 
DUI 

Alien Staker, 37, 611 North 
Aye., was going 54 mph in a 
40 mph zone. His motorcycle 
was weaving out of his lane. 
The officer made a traffic stop 
and noticed he had a strong 
odor of alcohol and blood- 
shot eyes. The officer asked 



for the drivers license and he 
pulled out a pack of cigarettes 
and said 'oh' this isn't my 
drivers license.' He was 
charged with speeding and 
driving under the influence of 
alcohol. He had a blood alco- 
hol level of .18. He is in Lake 
County Jail. He is scheduled 
to appear in court on July 20 
in Waukegan. 
Revoked license 

Robert Tipler, 34776 
Gerberding, Ingleside on June 
25 was charged with driving 
with a revoked license. He is 
scheduled to appear in court 
on Aug. 4 in Grayslake. He 
posted a $100 cash bond. 

Shelby Garrett, 2108 
Rolling Ridge, Lindenhurst 
on June 26 was charged with 
driving with a revoked li- 
cense. She is scheduled to ap- 
pear in court in Grayslake on 
Aug. 4. She posted a $1,000 
bond. 

LAKE VILLA 

Battery 

Anthony Chin, 23, 258 
Lakewood Dr., on June 22 al- 
legedly approached Patrick 
Stampaneto at the Shell sta- 
tion on Rte 83 and Grand. He 
grabbed Stampaneto in the 
neck and was choking him 
until Stampaneto broke free. 
Chin turned himself into Lake 
Villa police on June 24. He 
was charged with battery and 
was released on $1,000 bond. 
He is scheduled to appear in 
court in Waukegan on July 
14. 



by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers . 

Locar Boy Scouts, students, teachers, 
and parents received permission by the 
Antioch District 34 Board of Education to 
begin the Sequoit Creek erosion control 
project. This conservation project 
presents a unique opportunity to try novel 
erosion control techniques as well as 
beautify and benefit the surrounding area. 

The project site is located south of 
Hlghvicw Drive where the road crosses 
the Sequoit Creek. Apparently there-has 
been a great deal of erosion there. At 
least eight feet of the original bank has 
disappeared 

TTic work will be completed under the 
guidance of John Lueck and Rodney 
DuPont as part of their requirements for 
Eagle Scouts. These Scouts would be in 
charge of organizing and overseeing the 
project with the help of adult supervisors. 
Student workers will be recruited from 
local Scout troops and schools. 

Several methods of streambank 
stabilization have been proposed by the 



Lake County Soil and Water 
Conservation Department. A-jacks, 
which are precast concrete six pointed 
cubes, have been suggested. They are 
placed at the toe of an eroding.slope in an 
excavated trench. Two to three rows are 
nested together and a material called 
"Fibredam" is wedged between the A- 
jacks. 

Another method proposed is the 
installation of lunkers. Lunkers are 
wooden or plastic structures placed end io 
end in the bed of streams along the banks. 

Willow posts, which are native willow 
cuttings will be planted along the 
su-eambank. The willow root network 
binds the soil together and the foliage 
slows floodwaters near the eroding bank. 

The streambed stabilization project is 
part of a larger nonpoint source pollution 
study grant for the Sequoit Creek 
watershed. The streambed project will 
serve not only to reduce erosion but to 
visually demonstrate stream stabilization 
methods' for public viewing. 



Letters to the Editor 



LCAVC names top students 



The following ACHS 
students have been named 
"Student of the Year" at 
LCAVC in their respective 
program areas: Nicole 
Fisher, administrative office 
technology; Matt Parmley, 
commercial food service; 
and Mike Vavrina, small 
engine and RV repair. 
Nicole Fisher and Mike 



Vavrina were also finalist in 
"LCAVC Top Student" 
competition, and Nicole 
Fisher was named the win- 
ner. 

At the LCAVC Award 
Banquet on May 13, several 
ACHS students were hon- 
ored as . follows: Nicole 
Fisher, $500 scholarship, 
Nicole Garwood, $300 



scholarship, Kristin Gen- 
tleman, $1,500 Rotary 
Scholarship, Matt Parmley 
$1,050 in Culinary Arts 
Scholarships, Chris Gen- 
tleman, $250 Culinary 
Scholarship, and Robb 
Raukohl, $50 scholarship 
and the opportunity for an 
apprenticeship with Local 
250. 



New Arrivals 



Be defensive 

Hditoc 

At the June 7 Antioch 
Village Board Meeting, 
Trustee Cunningham re- 
quested installation of a 
cross-walk and signage from 
Anita St to North Ave. 

Due to school now be- 
ing out and this busy inter- 
section's location to Cen- 
tentiial Park, he felt a 
crosswalk would help cau- 
tion motorists to slow 
down. Trustee Cunningham 
stated he recently saw a mo- 
torist stop quickly to avoid 
hitting a young person on a 
bike. 

Defensive driving falls 
not only to motorists, but 
to bicyclists as well, kids 
and adults. 

Many of our youth use 
safe bicycling habits, but 
many do not, which, unfor- 
tunately, is also true of 
many motorists. As a mo- 



torist, I have had to stop 
quickly many times to 
avoid hitting kids on bikes 
who dart out m traffic and 
try to play "beat the car." 
This has happened to me, 
my husband and may others 
I know throughout our vil- 
lage during the day and after 
dark. 

Trustee Larsen stated 
that if one life is saved by 
installing a crosswalk, we're 
ahead, I also agree with 
this. However, the larger 
picture is both bicyclists 
and motorists have a re- 
sponsibility to use safe, de- 
fensive driving habits when 
operating their respective 
vehicles. 

Perhaps then, not only 
will one life be saved this 
summer, but many lives 
will be saved, which is re- 
ally most important. 

Kaihy Allen 
Antioch 



Patty praise 

Editor: 

An open letter to the 
Village of Lake Villa: 

Please realize what an 
asset you have in your for- 
mer town clerk and current 
employee Patty Dewar. We 
all know she is competent 
in her position, but most 
importandy, she is compas- 
sionate. She really cares 
about people. We think 
most of us choose to live in 
small towns specifically for 
that reason. We want to 
know and care about our 
neighbors. ■ 

Patty exemplifies that 
feeling in her professional 
and personal life, and we 
think it's time she is recog- 
nized. 

Patty Prosis Schumm 
Portage, Mich. 



Taylor Lunnae Conwell 

A daughter, Taylor Lunnae, wajs bora April 16 at Condell Medical 
Center to Milo and Kimbcrly Conwell of AnUoch. She hu two brothew, 
Derek, 3 and Matthew, 10 and a sister, Vanessa, 9. Grandparents are Bill 
and Lynn Eves of Antioch, Don and Alice Conwell of Antioch. Great 
grandparent is Mickey Klauda of Round Lake. 

Alex Richard Babik 

A son, Alex Richard, was born April 26 at Victory Memorial 
Hospital to David and Deborah Babik of Antioch. He has a sister, 
Sabrina, 16 mos. Grandparents are Richard and Barbara Babik of 
Hinsdale, Cornelius and Phyllis Meyer of Evansville, Ind. Great 
grandparents are John and Blanche Babik of Trevor, Wis,, Mary Carrico 
of Evansville, Ind. 

■. * 
Tauri Lee Feldmann 

A daughter, Tauri Lee, was born April 30 at Lake Forest Hospital to 
Valerie and Eric Feldmann of Antioch. Grandparents are Linda and Fred 
Kadcr of Antioch, Lucille and Harry Feldmann of Lake Villa. Great 
grandparents are Wilma and Mike Anderson of Englewood, Fla. 

Tyler Jacob Miltimore 

A son, Tyler Jacob, was born May 23 at Northern Hlinoii Medical 
Center to Steven and Tracy Miltimore of Antioch, He has a brother, 
Kyle, 4. Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Reed of McHcnry and Mr., and 
^u's. Miltimore of Richmond. 

Trey Michael Kellogg 

A son. Trey Michael, was bora May 19 at Condell Medical Center to 
Chad and Jamie Kellogg of Antioch. Grandparents arc Cindy and Brad 
Bonato of Spring Grove, George and Chris Kellogg of Antioch. Great 
grandparents are Janice and Richard Ostry. 

Samantha Elizabeth Lundin 

A daughter, Samantha Elizabeth, was born May 19 at Condell 



Medical Center to Stefan and Valerie Lundin of Antioch. She has a 
brother Steven, 3. Grandparents are Carl and Darlene Sapicga of Lake 
Villa. 



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PUBUC NOTICE 

State Bank of Antioch, as Trustee under a Trust 
Agreement dated November 21, 1968, and known as 
Trust Number 88-144; Rrst Nationwide Bank; State Bank 
of Antioch; Sotiais T. Tontis and Michele J. Tontis; Linda 
Hess, Lake County Clerk; Occupants or Persons in 
Possession, Unknown Owners or Interested Parties 
TAX DEED NO. 90 TX 4 

TAKE NOTICE 
COUNTY OF LAKE. STATE OF ILLINOIS 
Date Premises Sold; December 10. 1990 
Permanent index No. 02-08-1 12-019 
Sold for General Taxes of 1989 
Sold for Spedal Assessment of N/A 
And Special Assessment No. N/A 
Warrant No. N/A Inst No. N/A 

THIS PROPERTY H AS BEEN SOLD FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 
Propert/ located at 768 N. Main SL, Antioch. IL 60002 
Legal Description or Permanent Index No. 02-08-1 12-019 

This notlcG is to advise you that the above property 
has been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of 
redemption from the sale will expire on November 16, 
1993. 

This official notice, is also to advise you that a Petition 
has been filed for a tax deed which will transfer title and 
the right to possession of this property if redemption Is 
not made on or before November 18, 1993. 

This matter Is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of 
this County in Waukegan, Illinois, on November 23, 
1993. 

You may be present at this heanng but your right to 
redeem will already have expired at that time. 

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY TO 
PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY 

Redemption can be made at any time on or before 
November 18, 1993, by applying to the County Clerk of 
Lake County, Illinois, at the County Courthouse in 
Waukegan, Illinois. 

For further information contact the County Cleri<, 

Sarah P. Lessman, Attorney for 

Purchaser, Goldman or Piersma, Agent 

■^ 0693D-783-AR 

June 25, 1993 
July 2, 1993 
July 9, 1993 



58 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



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GET'lT"OFF 

YOUR CHEST 

1708)223^8073 




IT'S THE T^k OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 21) 

not aware of the number of deaths that occuiircd at those 
crossings before the gates were installed. I say, trains 
blow your horns all you want. What is more 
important? 

Time well spent? 

This is to the person froni Round Lake Beaeh timing 
the amount of time the police spend at the White Hen. 
Don't you have anything better to do with your time? 
Get a life. 

Will take the police 

This to all you guys complaining about police. As 
far as I am concerned, all of the police can move to 
Round Lake. The speeders can stay in Haines ville, 
Antioch, and Vernon Hills. There are children riding 
bikes, elderly people walking, and families out^and 
about I am happy to drive the speed limit to protect 
these people, so the poUce can come here and keep you 
speeders out ' 

Wants new road 

It appears ^m the last Lake Villa board meeting that 
a number of citizens are upset with Jim Semmerling. 
He had sent a letter to the Lake County Public Works 
department canceling the black top work scheduled for 
the Fox Lake Hills area, due to the unfortunate 
circumstances in the township; What is gomg on here? 
Our roads have been torn up in Fox Lake Hills. Is there 
no money? Orchard Gardens and Fox Lake H'Us deserve 
to have their roads paved. 

Likes idea 

I am calling from North Ciiicago about the person 
complaining about child support I am not having 
trouble getting my child support, but am getting 
nowhere havmg my child's medical bills paid. Your 
petition sounds good. 

Parking protester 

Mr. Thelen, you can take your parking ban and pari: it 
you know where. Until you start paying my taxes on 
my house, you cannot tell rae where to park. 
Especially in my„own yard. If you want to clean up all 
the junk, start with the junk cars across from the 
Ingleside station. Keep your shipid mouth shut you 
contractor wanna-be. 

Elderly supporter 

Thank you Mr. Semmerling for trying to help the • 
elderly people. We only hope you can come back again 
next year. 

No brake problem 

Before you sound off, check your facts and the five 
buses from the Lake Villa after-school program. These 
buses do not have air brakes and have never had thenL 
Our drivCTS have many years of accident free experience 
and care very much for the children. 

Clearing the air 

,The FCC no longer responds to home entertainment 
equipment interference complaints by performing on 
site visits or investigations. This is due to reductions 
in federal spending. The FCC is working with 
equipment manufacturers to attack interference problems 
at their roots with possible future regulatory action. 
Visit a Radio Shack store to purchase a high pass filter 
for your TV sets. I live in Grayslake. 

Damn the ham 

I believe the obscene ham radio operator from Lake 
Villa should lose his license. He should also be 
investigated since he does use police codes. Good 
riddance, Buckwheat 

Teach your parents well 

Kids with disabilities deserve a chance! I am growing 
up in Lake Villa schools and we arc being taught that , 
differences do not matter. Why are our parents saying 
something else? I am a kid from Lindenhurst 



Big numbers? 



Mr. Lead Foot of Vemon Hills, you obviously have 
enlarged numbers on your telephone in order to dial 
phone numbers. Maybe Vemon Hills' can provide a 
service just for you, enlarged numbers on their speed 
limit signs. Your big problem is your "I'm better than 
thou" syndrome. Hopefully, you don't teach your 
children that only the people "beneath" you need to be 
disciplined. 



Happy park goer 

I think that the Wauconda Park District is doing a 
wonderful job. They have brought many great things to 
our town, especially since the beach and theater have 
closed. Our, children do not have that many places to 
go, and I believe the alternatives to drugs and gang 
activity is good clean fun. 

Uncabled 

I don't know why everyone was complaining that 
they could not watch the Bulls gaine on cable. I do not 
have' cable and was able to watch the game on chaimel 
5. It came in very clearly. 

Great idea! 

I am from Antioch and I am calling for the folks 
who were not able to watch TV when the cable went 
out When I had cable installed, I remarked to the 
installer that I was concerned about losing reception in a 
storm. For the'cost of $10, he installed a switch which 
allows me to switch from cable to my TV aerial. When 
cable comes back on, you simply just switch back. It 
is very simple and reasonable. 

Salary questions 

This is for the President of College of Lake County 
in regards to his Scdary of $121,000 not including the 
perks. He commented that he feels that he EARNS this 
salary and perks. I would like to see.a comparison 
between bis work and the duties of the new 
superintendent ofschools in Chicago. Her salary is 
$175,000. If his $121,000 is warranted, she should be 
making $750,000. Or, maybe he should take her job 
since he has done such a great job here. 

Wild riders 

Why are there are two squad cars at Route 45 
watching for speeders, while blocks away, drivers zoom 
on Pleasure and Shady Lanes at high rates of speed. 
Why not put speed bumps on the roads to discourage 
the wild ones. These residents pay taxes too. lam 
from Mundelein. 

Distracted by zappers 

The owners of bug zappers need to remember your 
neighbors. Your zapper may be near neighbors 
bedroom windows or TV rooms. It is unpleasant to 
have to listen to them while frying to sleep or watch 
TV. Turn them off when you don't need them. It is 
, annoying as heck. 

The thought that counts? 

, I realize that we need some programs for the 
handicapped and elderly. However, it is illegal for Mr. 
Semmerling to use township funds and equipment to 
trespass on private property to plow driveways and other 
things. The taxpayers are paying for this. Not to 
mention he has no insurance if damage to property 
occurs. 




Hates signs 



Lakelal^ 

XcA-spapers - 




I am from Lake Villa and would like everyone to 
drive around to look at the stupid street signs 
Semmerling put up. It looks like a landing strip for 
airplanes. 

Safe fun 

Would you rather have police sirens coming into your 
neighborhood than.the sound of a bouncing basketball? 
Maybe you would rather see fighdng and gun shots. I 
know where my kids are and what they are doing. I can 
keep an eye on them and they can have some good fun. 

Reformed voter 

Trustee Wolf, of Lake Villa, I did not vote for you 
this last election. But, I will in the next! Thank you 
for standing up and telling the truth. 

Wants a retirement 

Wake up sheriffs department. The sheriff should 
retire so we can get a sheriff who wants to do a job and 
not just collect a paycheck. The sheriffs department is 
crashing and burning. 

Must be a democrat 

The cable monopoly will condnue as long as some 
Republican politician gets his or her kickback. That 
way, the cable company does not have to hire anyone to 
man the phones on the weekend. Or, maybe the 
weekend wages are the kickback. Are you a Republican? 
From the Fox of Antioch. 



oesii't want to share 



ITie right to the road is a figment of your 
imagination: The truth is that you and all the other 
idiots in Wauconda who insist on riding in the road are 
merely tol^ated by us good Samaritans. We, by the 
way, pay road taxes, gas taxes, insurance, and 
registration fees. My opinion is that none of you 
should be on the road. Why not ride on the tollway?. 



Holey roads 



Spring Grovels fiiU of pot-holes. When is 
something going to be.done about it? . 

Fund corrections 

The correct amount of money in the Lake Villa 
general assistance fund is over $55,000. There is a paid 
administrator who gets paid $14,000 a year. Only 
$4,000 was given away last year. That does not seem 
to be very much. There is a lot' that can and should be 
done by Sue Hanson. ■ 

Rebuttal 

I am Sue Hanson, Lake Villa Township Supervisor. 
I'm calling in response to "Loosen the purse". No 
single parent with three children has come into the 
office and applied for general assistance. Understate 
law, they would not qualify or be eligible for general 
assistance. They would, however, be referred tp.public 
aid. The Townslup's general assistance program is also 
a welfare program. If you have any questions or need 
further information, please feel fre« to call me at my 
office at 356-2116. 

Police supporter 

I hope you print this. Police officers put theu" lives 
in jeopardy every time they stop someone for a traffic 
violation. They are spit on, harassed, and abused and 
have to keep smiling. Yet, you feel they don't deserve a 
coffee break? I take my hat off to the Lake Zurich 
police. By the way, they cannot stop cars for going 
only 5 miles over the speed limit. It has to be 12 to 15 
miles over. What would you jackasses do without the 
police force? How many lives have you saved today? 

Stop the whining 

I am calling from Wauconda. I agree with the caller 
who wants to get the jet-skis off Bangs Lake. The 
annoying whine makes the lake much less attractive. 
The skiers don't seem to understand safety rules and 
even run into each other. 

Why are we paying? 

I am from Libertyville Township. Why are we 
paying for health coverage for trustees and part-time 
employees? Aren't they covered by their spouses and 
other employers? Are other townships doing this? 

Highway department wife? 

For the first time, someone has said something good 
about Mr. Senunerling. Tell him to thank the men 
who woric for him. And I am glad our government is 
finally shaping up and we get rid of hint 

Pay first 

I totally disagree with the teenager from Wauconda 
who thinks bicyclists have a right to the road I think 
that only until a bicyclist pays insurance, taxes, and 
license fees should they be endtled to a right to the 
road. 

Quit picking on kids 

I am the mother of a 18-year-old who has never been 
in trouble with the law or a gang. This message is for 
the Round Lake police. Stop harassing him when he 
drives down the street. Remember you have to have 
probable cause before to pull someone over and age is 
not probable cause. Not all teenagers are bad. 

Mystery tickets 

I am also getting parking tickets from the City of 
Chicago. I have not been there in 10 years. The 
license plate number of the ticket is not even inine. 
Still, they insist I must go down there to court and 
straighten it out. I am from Round Lake Park. 

Costly communication 

Mr. Semmerling just sent two certified letters to Sue 
Hanson. One was to tell her he needed a copy of the 
budget and the other to tell her never to verb^ly speak 
to highway personnel. Each letter cost $2.80, which is 
misspent taxpayer money. Can't he walk next door? 



Friday, July 2. 1993 



Lakoland Nowspapors 59 



Lakoland Newspapori 63 







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Lyme disease vaccine proven safe, effective 



The United States 
Department of 
Agriculture (USDA) has 
granted the first ftdl 
federal license for a 
canine Lyme disease 
vaccine. The Inoculation 
that protects dogs has 
been approved as safe 
and effective. 

According to the USDA 
analysis, field perfor- 
mance evaluations of the 
product in Lyme disease 
endemic areas over the 
last 20 months have 
shown that Fort Dodge 
Laboratories' 
LymeVaxTM vaccine is 
safe and that vaccinated . 
dogs are eight times less 
likely to exhibit clinical 
symptoms of Lyme 
disease than 
non-vaccinated dogs. 
These findings are part of 
a presentation to be given 
at an upcoming confer- 
ence on tick-bome dis- 
eases in September in St 
Paul, Minn. 

"While the world waits 
for a human vaccine, dog 
owners can now have 
their pet vaccinated 
against this debilitating 
disease," says Dr. Steven 
A. Levy, one of the veteri- 
narians who conducted 
the field tests on the ca- 
nine vaccine. "Dogs are 
six to ten times more 
likely to catch Lyme dis- 




ease than are humans be- 
cause they are much more 
likely to be exposed to tick 
bites." - more- 

The five-year devel- 
opment of the canine vacr 
cine is detailed in two ar- 
ticles scheduled to be 

published in the August 
' 1992 issue of The Journal 



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One of the articles de- 
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clinical signs of Lyme dis- 
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ting. This breakthrough 



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was pivotal to the devel- 
opment and testing of an 
effective vaccine. 

Subsequendy, this 
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'Hie second article de- 
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bacterium that causes 
Lyme disease. The Fort '. 
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antigens^ which have 
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ture to stimulate the most 
protective Inmiunlty 
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In addition, the article 
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Dodge vaccine protects 
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throughout the country. 
This was shown in re- 
search used to challenge 
the vaccine v^dilch used 



Lyme disease organisms 
from a'dlffcrent 
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the United States than the 
organism used to niake 
the vaccine. The vaccine 
proved effective hi these 
tests. 



According to the au- 
thors, this indicates the 
vaccine is capable of 
stimulating a 
cross-protective 
immunity in vaccinated 
dogs against different 
strains of Lyme disease. 




Ammi 
JHwm 



Grayslake Animal Hospital 

Practice limited to small animals 
Dr. Kenneth Poole 
Dr. Mark Lotspelch 
Dr. David Jackson 
Dr. Susan Sallee 
Dr. Lorl Blackwell 
Dr. Julie Hail 

(700)223-8612 



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PUPPIES FOR SALE 

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60 Lakeland Nawiipapert 



Friday, July 2, 1993 



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A Recap of Our Services ' 

All our classes are limiteid in size for greater 
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No need to take notes - we supply a handout 
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Stop in and watch a class at any time, ^ even if 
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A FREE PHOTO SITTING -WORTH $25.00 
A FREE DAY CARE SESSION - WORTH $10.00 

When: Sunday, July 11, 1993 




Where 




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872 Tower Rd. 
Mundelein, IL 6006Q 
566-1960 



Time: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm 



*Puppy Obedience/Socialization Class 

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10 weeks; Ages 6 month and older 

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I *FlybaIl 

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*Grooming - Dog & Cat 

Large or small we take them all. Walk in or by appointment 

^Photography - "Pet Personalities'* 

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'IM 



I Friday, July 2, 19W 



Lakaland Nowspopors 61 



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Lakoland Nowspapert 63 



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Lakelanp N ewspapebs Is Your 



TOPLA^GE 
YOUR AD 

CALL \^^ 

708^223^8161 







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To These Fine U^CELftWD Abea BusiNESS_&_SironGES 



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DOWTTHROIVAWAV 
THAT OLD LAiWP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMPDOCTORS^ 
FORRBPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC, 

33261 N. Highway 45 

Wildwood, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8691 





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Is Shopping 
A Chore For You? 

We offer a variety oftenicea 
.GROCERY SHOPPING 

•Girr SHOPPING ^; 

•ERRAND RUNNING ^' 

IT S AFFORDABLE! 
(708) 949-3170 






HEATING & 
COOLING 

LENNOX ' 

.QUALITY HIGH EFFICIENT 
AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE . 

.10 POINT SUMMER EFFICIENCY 
CHECK 

•AIR CLEANERS-WATER HEATERS 

•HUMIDIFIERS 

(708) 526-6286 
(815)459-2300 

. . Serving Your Communily 

i a^' SALES-SERVICE 

V * An I rideponldent Lennox Dealer 
j;;^^, . For 25 Years. 

"^ Locally over 40 years. 



HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Bates 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)587-9729 



GREEKIHOrSE 

.Vegetable & Flower Plants of 

all kinds - »5«^ and up 
.perennial & Vegetable Plants 

3" Peat Pots - 95* each 
•Geranium & Potted Plants 

of all kinds 
8 Miles north onjoogGnwe 

V2 mile nodh ofKout£ aa 
onOldMcifauyRoad 




LAWNS FOR LESS 

Is MoMiiif^/IVi'V''''*'*'""^"?"'*-'""*^ 

$ Compdcto lam md^fai'i^ 
I Cull ilui Experts 

s.CJ'SUMDSCAPEMAIHTEMAHCE. 

I (708) 43i5-:^667 



pf-y:»;*.-#--gB 



t LAWNWORKS t 

A • Trees • Maintenance • Shrubs * 

Jk •Flagstone Steppers • Sod • Boulder walls * 

1 -Spring Cleanup J^^BL •Reasonable Rates A 
j^ .Retainer Walls fflS^^BI CaU -Dennis Adams * 



Flninclng 
Avtilcbte 



I Avtilc! 



24 Hour 
Setvlce 




5decksavers+? 






Pressure Washing 
Preserving 'Staining 

•Decks •Siding 

•Fences •Docks 

Pressure Treated Wood is 

NotWeatherproofi 

INSURED JOHN 




CENTURY 
OAKS CABlNETSl 

Rte. 45 & state Line 

Hours: M-f'. 930-5; Closed Wod: Sal 930-2 

Bench Kitchen Cabinets 

Fine cabinetry in Oak, 
Birch. Cherry &Hicl<ory 

liBertch 

1(708) 395-3418 or (BOO) 870-9619 





t NO J6B too SMALL! (708) 546-3231 2 

Custom Decks, Patios, & Walks 

By Outdoor Living Specialties 

CONSULTATION & DESIGN ^ , 

Free Estimates! Also Available: 

Full Line of Maintenance for Decks 

I • Water Seal • Restoration • Staining 

INSURED _^i REFERENCES 

I^TIOCH lA ■ / (708) 838-0093 1 



^eiher It's a &^c^4&^0^ 
far \aar Business Gpff^'^v** A- •^•i'^liti^^^v^i 




ll BUILD DECKS| 

land paint houses. 

For reUable, quality work 
caU ■ 

Ibmshomehrowmto 

(708) 816-8190 

iuNCAN 



Interiors/Exteriors 
FREE ESTIMATES 

Insured QuallwWGrK. 

References - Top Line Matenals 

WE DO OUR OWN WORK 

Call Preston 
(708)566-1002 



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Serving yovr painting 
and decorating needs. 

Ccmplete InioioryEiierior 
Alio Munli/Cuitom Woric 
Quiliiy WoA - NciUy Done 

FREE.EffriMATES 
Affordable Prices 

"Have tice k)b done wcm"!" 
Can (708) 223-2656 
• 24 Hr, Message 



The Village Astrologer 

> An Invitationto Meet^ 

'** The New Reader ^aclj^l 




•Vi. 



Discover 
Renting 

You can do it yourself 
(708) 740-8800 

Round Lake Park 



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RENTAl, itic, 






.mkdnBusinessServices 
Resumes 

Personally designed 

and written for your 

individual needs 

FKEE CONSULTATION 

For appt.calL 

(708) 5a6>0046 



J 



A g^ted psychic known for being accurate and honest, a 
friend and advisor on everyday life. All readings arepn- 
vote and cor^ruial.Availablefor parties and gatherings, 

4330 Golf Rd.. Skokie 675 Central. Highland PaiK 

(708) 32 9-0151 (706)926-9196 

WINDOW PAINES I 

winHnTv7|r Glass ScrvJce 

ScrapinglGIass cutting 
Painting Minors 
Pu tty jligM Carpentry 

_^FREE ESTIMIATBS /r 
Sx\(708) 336-7038(^^ 

'^J TTD Availabls 



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(' - 
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EATIN 

LIN 



$10.00 OFF Air CondiUomrigi 
tune-Up During May! 



24 Hour Sen/ice 
(708)872-5353 

Sales & Service Since 1959 



SMITH 

Spray-Brush & Roll 



WATERSEAL 
PAINT - STAIN 



siding, lilm. wood, dfvwall block, 

stucco, concfele, 

We have Ihc cxpeflervce and Ihe equipment 

to do the Job right; 

Ffee Estimates Reasonable Rates 

(708)244-2202 ASK FOR MEL 



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I Dccoradbig U 

d •Wallpaper Hanging ■ 
d •Bit/Ext PalntiMg • 
d FKEE ESTIMATES g 

m All work Insured & • 
d guaranteed 9 

{_ (815) 344-8612 J 



GINO'S 

Light Carpentry 

Call Now 

Free Estimates 

Affordable Rates 

Fully Insured 

Quality Work with Written 

Guarantee 

C70«f> SXfcglOX 




Duradean 

Rated best by 
independent tests. 

Carpet & 
Furniture 
cleaning 

CALL 
TODAYl 

V (708) 

^^=^^587-2356 



Fine 
Homes 




mBmrsetxaeegimrinxmrimemBtasmeBtiiimm 

OPTIMUM 

FAINTING €f DECORATING 

Expertise In all wall coverings. 

Fine Decorative Painting 'Muhl-ailofod spray 

•Staining 

• Dry wall Repair 

"you; ScrtU/oclion is My Business* 

708/263-1504 




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Duradean 

SPECIALISTS 

Duracleati... the standard of 
excellence for over 50 years 



. Jllli millitiilllllJ ^ 
by 

PaulZasadil 

»Ncw Homes , •Renovations 
•Additions -Caipcntry 

(708)566-4724 



Free estlmatoi'lnsured-Gfaduata ol 
U .S.School ol Prda sslona! Papaitianspng 



E&AHOME 
*ROVEME] 

Kitchens • Baths • Decks 
Room Additions 

\ NO JOB TOO SMALL 

[ free estimatesi 

(708)526-3976 



Friday, Jiily 2, 1993 



62 Lakeland Newspapers 



■w-wf'r 'W II "" I ' ' ' T " 





T&CMETALCO. 

We recycle aluminum cansi 



We also buy 
•Copper • Brass 
•Aluminum Siding 
•Auto Rodiolori 



Buyers of non-ferrous metals. 
Industrial accourils welcome. 



•Insulated wire 
•Lead • Stainless 
•Balleries • 2anc 
•Catalytic Converters 

378 Prairie St. 
Crystal Lake, tl 



The Original #1 Name m 
Fence for Over 30 Years 

100 Ceda r Stk'lcs • Chai n Unli • Wiwlghitroti . PVC • « uminum 



.-*1lM- .,|......M»'" 



815-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8-5; Sat. 8-1 



1 Blocks, of Hwy- 176 
Behind J & L Gas Station 






Visit Our Showroom & Factory 
Meier's Fence 

FrDD In Home ^^A^, 

EstlmalOS ■ 726-7665 587-7711 

B00-824-1B57 lakezuhich fox lake 



BASEBALL GAPSI 



Polyester, Mesh Back 

Light or Dark Fronts 

$2.49 each I 

144 or more with imprint. 



Call ITEMS and IDEAS (708) 438-7488 



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MORS IJ WAL K ON, inc. 

^^^^^^^^^^■■'■*"'^™^"^^^^""^"~ 

CarpcU • n«rdwood • Cenunlc • Vinyl 
Kitchen & Balhroom Rcmodollng 

RetUUniial & Commenitd IiutaUadan 

^LWOBK ClIARANTEED 

Free Estimates 
(708)356-2500 
(708)310-5220 



1 





A AAA **>******* 

* CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC. A 

A UWDSCAPE DESIGNERS ICOHTRACTOftS A 

M Semii0LalipCmmti}SiJwl96O * 

* .Computer Design -368(1109 ^^ 

* •Flagslone Ratios 'Sodding ji. 
A. Stone Walls •Planting A 
A .Texture Gardens .Grading * 

i (708)746-8953 A 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



BOR5IC ik SON 

LAN DSG APING 

Landscape Contractors 
and Maintenance 
Silt Seeding ' 
Complete Renovation 

•Seeding •Sodding 
•Trees •Shrubs 
•Topsoll •Woodchlps 
Free Estimates 
(708)662-3134 



RAM ConstriiCtion 

Specializing in Carpentry 

• New 

Construction 

• Remodeling 

Free Estimates - 

Insured 

ROY 
708-7401447 



JACK'S 

REMODEUNG 

Siding •Soffit •Windows 
Decks • Bathrooms • Basements 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 
CALL JACK AT 

(708)546-3759 



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'•Ceiilrig Fans ■.Remodelmg 
.Fixtures tRewiring 

•TV & Teleplione .Service 
Jacks Installed Upgrades 
LICENSED -INSURED 
C70B) 740-4132 
1-800-540-9451 






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HANIilHG 

MS-^'/Roll 

•Suede •Ctoth 
•Foil •Canvas 

•Sizing &Wal Prep Ind. 

20 yrs. experience. 

Endless References 

* A Craftsman! . 

(708) 838^1669 



I'S 
MAINKNIUICE 

1^0 Job Too Small, ni Do It AIL 
URemodeling 

Kitchens, Bathrooms & Rec Rooms 

fainting And Wallpapering 
'Flooring 

•Siding And Roofing 

•Carpentry 

decks & Additions 

ill Work Very Well Oone 

ran ESTIMATES, CAU 
(414)53M439_ 



ALUMINUM 8 
VINYL SIDING 

Soffit & Fascia 
Window Trim • Vinyl 

Replacement V^indows 
-^ " * Work Guaranteed 

Insured -Free Estimates 
'**' 25 yrs. Experience 

i EAGLE SIDING CO. 
(708) 526-7222 




CONTRACTORS 



COMPLETE REMODELING 
SERVICES 

ALUMINUM SIDING, GUrrEPS. 

DECKS. GARAGES. ADDmONS. 

KTTCHENS and BATHROOMS 

j*.orr.o«* 708-973-2120 



Anywhere In Lake Co. 
2yards*55"5yard3*70** 
4yards»65"6yards*75" 

Sand - Grave! - Etc. 
Delivered - Call Anytime 

Ikeuy servicesI 

(708) 587-7500, 






FINANCIAL PtANNING 



Robert RnzwoLLER, CPA 

• Tax Deferred Investments 

• Life/Disability Insurance 

• Tax Preparation 

Free FmNCiAi Analysis 

Gall for details 

(708) 587-4552 



[DECKS PLUS! 

CONSTRUCTION 
I GENERAL CARPENTRY 

. Custom Decks • Porches 
• Room Additions .BasBmGrt Remodeling 
•"BalJirooms - Kitchens • Custom Caipenlfy 
* I mprovements & Repairs I 

INSURED & BONDED 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889-8442 

Please Call Gary Kolkau 





^(j^ WILLS 

1^^ From $29 




NO ATTORNEYS, mi SIMPIE. HO millHG C^ 

BUSINESS PLANS -RESUMES AND MORE | 

CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 
WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 
(708) 548-1300 




PECKS 

Cleaned AND 
Sealed 

Quality W<::>^^ 
Fair Fees 

Tom 

(708) 941-1274 



Piano Tuning 
& Repair 

Call John 
(708) 548-1403 



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ramodellnfl 



FOUR PAWS 

TRAINING CENTER 



1993 



4- 



KITCHENS, BATHS. S 

DOOR & WINDOW M 

. REPLACEMENTS, ^ 

8 SKYLIGHTS. DECKS f 

5 SMALL JOBS A g 

2 SPECIALTY - 2 

8 Free Estimates J 

5 (708)4^|90^^ 

Friday, July 2, 1993 



"Positive -n-aining With Positive Results" 

Ing. For more Momialton ploaM ghro us a cal. „„„ „c I 

20970 White Road • Antlooh. IL 60002 • (708) 83M523| 




RICKTHE 
HANDY GUY 

•ftw QiMtf HToricnMnth/p' 
We wia do ths smal )(As no one 

wanis, and the big jobs 
everytjody does, VTO lust do II. 

10% OFF WITH THIS ad! 
FREE (708) »M)-I8»0 

E^flMAXES (815) »*»-57e8 

. PtumWng • Kltchan & B«th* • Dflcki 
• aeclricd • Carpwtry * Painting ' BaitmwU 



— — —COUPON————— 

[ BUYING \ 

Aluminum Cans 

♦COPPER *BRASS 
* AUTO RADIATORS 
*LEAD 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(708) 587-0788 

HOURS: 

Mon. - Frl. 

9 a.ni. - 5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

closQd 12-12:30 for lunch 



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Receive 2t MORE per pound 
over pur current prices on 
^ aluminum cans . ^^ 

I ^^■""- — TTtT 

j Expires 7-X8-93 



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Lakeland Nowtpapon 63 









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AU-U-CAN EAl i-tii^™^*; ■ i 

jundaysJI^T^^ 




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COUPON 



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AVAILABLE AT 
FARTICIPATING 



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Rte. 173 & 83 



Rte. 83 & Genter St. 



Sheridan Rd, & 
WadswprthRd. 




Filday.JulyS, 



M lakeland New»papot«